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Paula Lydon
03-06-2004, 07:58 AM
~~What does 'shin' in Japanese mean? I was told by someone that it refers to, say, the internal integrety or core of a thing, person, idea, etc. Is that correct? Thanks!:circle:

Jack Robertson
03-06-2004, 09:02 AM
I heard that it means attitude.

But I'm not 100% sure of that.

DarkShodan
03-06-2004, 10:19 AM
Again, it's my understanding, there are several kanji that are pronounced "Shin". I have a t-shirt that has "shin" on it that means balance or center. I have a tattoo of "Shin" that means God. Different kanji symbols.

Josh Bisker
03-06-2004, 05:10 PM
it's the part of the leg between your ankle and your knee, on the front. jeez guys, it's not like it's another language or anything

wendyrowe
03-06-2004, 06:07 PM
I was looking it up recently in my Tuttle Language Library Kanji & Kana handbook because our school is named Seishin.

The book lists more than a dozen different kanji pronounced SHIN. The two I've seen used most in my 2-year foray into the martial arts kanji world are the kanji for the Chinese-derived SHIN meaning "heart, mind; core" (Japanese "kokoro") and the Chinese-derived SHIN meaning "God" (Japanese "kami").

With any luck, your thread'll catch the eye of someone who actually speaks Japanese so s/he can tell us something truer than a dictionary could.

Peter Goldsbury
03-06-2004, 07:38 PM
``What does 'shin' in Japanese mean? I was told by someone that it refers to, say, the internal integrety or core of a thing, person, idea, etc. Is that correct? Thanks!:circle:
Hello Paula,

There are at least three ways of answering your question.

1. The Japanese-English dictionary that I have here at home (the latest edition of Kenkyusha's New Japanese-English Dictionary) lists 12 meanings, each with its own main Chinese character. The meanings, in order, are (1) heart/mind/spirit; (2) padding, wick, or lead for a pencil; (3) a subject, retainer, or vassal; (4) faith/sincerity (\this might perhaps be the meaning you were told): (5) deity; (6) Chin (Chinese ruler); (7) truth\ (or this one); (8) Qin (Chinese dynasty); (9) Qing (another Chinese dynasty); (10) bed/sleep; (11) novelty; (12) short for 'shingen' = proverb or aphorism.

2. The Japanese-English Kanji dictionary I have here (the revised Nelson) lists 79 different characters for shin, 12 of which are characters alluded to above. which suggests that the vast majority of the characters are not encountered singly, but always as part of a word. Notice that Wendy Rowe's answer ties the meaning of this character to that of another, about which you could ask the same question.

3. Asking a Japanese native speaker. Actually, I have found this way the least productive, since the native speaker will go through a similar process to the one I have just done above, but mentally and without knowing all the possibilities, and then ask about the context in which the word is used. It would be like asking me the meaning of 'bank', for example (verb?, noun?, side of a river?, building?). I am not entirely sure whether my answer would be "truer" than the dictionary definition.

Best regards,

Paula Lydon
03-08-2004, 09:49 PM
~~Wow, thanks all, especially Peter G. I think I'm in over my head. I never guessed it meant SO many different things depending upon the context. I will conduct more research

:)

batemanb
04-19-2004, 05:05 AM
My youngest son is named Shin 真, the kanji taken from and given by my Sensei in Kobe means True, honest or sincere.

Coincidentally Wendy, our dojo is also Seishin 誠心, in this instance, the kanji for shin 心 is the same as that for heart/ spirit/ mind (Seishin = true heart, honest heart, true spirit, honest spirit, true mind, honest mind).

Pretty much goes along with what Peter has already said.

Regards

Bryan

aikidocapecod
04-19-2004, 10:07 AM
And shoshin means beginners mind.....so....does that mean that sho mean beginner? I have looked in a couple old English/Japanese dictionaries and could not find it....

akiy
04-19-2004, 10:56 AM
Hi Larry,

The "sho" in "shoshin" is the same as used as the first character in "shodan":

http://www.aikiweb.com/language/graphics/dict_gif/s/shodan.gif

The character "sho" in this case basically means "first" or "beginning".

-- Jun

aikidocapecod
04-19-2004, 11:36 AM
Shoshin is a concept that helps me in many areas, not just Aikido. If one enters any/every situation with a mind that is looking to learn something new, life will always be one of learning.

Orihime
05-10-2004, 01:38 AM
The kun pronunciation for "shin" is "kokoro", isn't it (I've forgotten the kanji) ?

Peter Goldsbury
05-11-2004, 01:05 AM
My youngest son is named Shin 真, the kanji taken from and given by my Sensei in Kobe means True, honest or sincere.

Coincidentally Wendy, our dojo is also Seishin 誠心, in this instance, the kanji for shin 心 is the same as that for heart/ spirit/ mind (Seishin = true heart, honest heart, true spirit, honest spirit, true mind, honest mind).

Pretty much goes along with what Peter has already said.

Regards

Bryan

Hello Bryan,

A further coicidence is that both 誠 and 真 can ne read as makoto.

Best regards,

batemanb
05-11-2004, 02:48 AM
Hello Bryan,

A further coicidence is that both $B@?(B and $B??(B can ne read as makoto.

Best regards,


Yes, if we'd had a girl instead she was going to have the same kanji and be called Mako :) !

Rgds

Bryan

otto
05-11-2004, 02:59 AM
The kun pronunciation for "shin" is "kokoro", isn't it (I've forgotten the kanji) ?

This one perhaps?

aikidocapecod
05-11-2004, 05:23 AM
I think that can mean heart or mind depending on context

Mark Jewkes
05-12-2004, 01:39 AM
Hi everybody
At the bottom of this page (Nishio Sensei Homepage) is a calligraphy reading shin bu ka iku. Would someone try to translate this for me? I was told that it roughly translates as: "True Budo educates (people). What is your interpretation?
http://www2u.biglobe.ne.jp/~nisio/

regards

Mark Jewkes
05-12-2004, 01:42 AM
sorry, you need to click the top button in the menue, for an biography of Nishio Sensei, and that page has the shin bu ka iku calligraphy at the bottom.

Orihime
05-12-2004, 03:08 AM
This one perhaps?
Yes, that's it.

Devon Natario
08-09-2004, 04:56 PM
Im a practioner of Shin Shin Jujitsu which translated means: The are of gentleness through heart and soul. Now I have looked this up many times and seen it translated into heart, sould, God, and Center. Hope that helps.

saltlakeaiki
08-16-2004, 10:57 AM
Paula,
I'd hate to offer an authoritative answer to you and then be wrong, but I'm pretty confident on this one :) There is a word "shin" which essentially means the innermost core of something, where it can be literal or figurative, i.e. it can mean either the tough center of a cabbage, or the innermost heart of a person. It can be written with the kanji for "kokoro" (which you see earlier in this thread), or with the same kokoro with "kusaganmuri" on top (i.e. grass radical above). I'm not on a Japanese capable computer right now and anyway I don't know how to incorporate kanji images in these forums yet.

I'd guess that one is more likely to write the character with grass on top if the meaning is purely physical/literal, and just "kokoro" if the meaning is more figurative/spiritual. However in the latter case there is always the danger (from the writer's perspective) that readers will read it as "kokoro" rather than "shin", so I'm not sure how a native speaking writer would choose. Probably it depends :)

HTH.
Dave

(gee, I just noticed this is a really old thread. I wonder if Paula's even still reading :))

Paula Lydon
08-16-2004, 07:55 PM
~~Yes, Dave, still following along. Well, doing my best to anyway :) Thanks!

Tatiana
08-25-2004, 02:48 PM
it's the part of the leg between your ankle and your knee, on the front. jeez guys, it's not like it's another language or anything

You know... When I saw the title, I thought that too... I mean, but who would be posting about shins in an Aikido forum.. So I came in out of curiosity... LOL! Guess I'm learning some new stuff here!! ;)