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Jay Jiunon
01-09-2001, 09:00 PM
I'll try to keep this letter short and simple as this is my very first time posting. (By the way, kudos on an exellent site with great surfability.) I am in some aspects very new to Aikido, but i have read and admired it from afar for it seems years now. The feeling i grea from watching others partake in this beautiful art brings a feeling into me i can only describe as beauty itself manifested inside. I tell you these things only because i want you to understand fully were im coming from. I'm 20 years old now and now i belive its time for me to begin my formal training in which i belive is something i will dedicate a great deal of my life to. They say its never to late so i ask you those of you who have already started on there journeys how i should go about this...It maybe rather simple, like walking to the nearest dojo, but i turn to this community which holds a wealth of information. Anything will do right about now in what i belive is a critical momment in my progression. Thank you for this bit of space in the Web. God bless.


Chad

DiNalt
01-09-2001, 09:33 PM
Jay Jiunon wrote:
It maybe rather simple, like walking to the nearest dojo, but i turn to this community which holds a wealth of information. Anything will do right about now in what i belive is a critical momment in my progression. Thank you for this bit of space in the Web. God bless.
Chad

Well, first of all you have to find a dojo as far away from your house as possible.

Second, try to come in the middle of the class. Who needs those warm-ups anyway ?

Third, immediately step on the mat, assume "the eagle stance" as seen in Karate Kid, and then challenge Sensei for a duel.

This should give you a good start.
Hehehe.

DiNalt
01-09-2001, 09:35 PM
That was a joke, Jay.

Just making sure.

DiNalt
01-09-2001, 09:35 PM
I mean Chad.

giriasis
01-09-2001, 10:13 PM
Welcome to AikiWeb.

Yeah, you already suggested the best advice. Step in a dojo.

But...

Don't just step into one. Shop around and try out a class or two in each dojo to get a feel for the instructor and the school atmosphere. Pay attention to how you are treated by the instructor and the fellow students.

Each dojo is different depending on its "style." (even from within the same organizations). The difference really are teaching approaches. The answer is what is the best for you and what you want to get out of your training.

Also if you have questions about different styles, you can always ask here. As you know there are plenty of people who have studied for years and are instructors themselves. So there will be a well of advice for you.

Anne Marie

Erik
01-09-2001, 11:11 PM
DiNalt wrote:
Well, first of all you have to find a dojo as far away from your house as possible.

Second, try to come in the middle of the class. Who needs those warm-ups anyway ?

Third, immediately step on the mat, assume "the eagle stance" as seen in Karate Kid, and then challenge Sensei for a duel.

This should give you a good start.
Hehehe.

More suggestions:

1. We like chewing tobacco. The bigger the wad the better. In fact many dojos keep a spitoon right in the front of the class on that altar thing for guests to use. If there isn't one, look to baseball for role models.

2. Be an individualist. Just because everyone else left their shoes by the door doesn't mean you have to. Feel free to just walk right on the mat. During class is best.

3. Be sure to ask why men are wearing dresses?

DiNalt
01-09-2001, 11:39 PM
Erik wrote:
[B
More suggestions:

1. We like chewing tobacco. The bigger the wad the better. In fact many dojos keep a spitoon right in the front of the class on that altar thing for guests to use. If there isn't one, look to baseball for role models.

2. Be an individualist. Just because everyone else left their shoes by the door doesn't mean you have to. Feel free to just walk right on the mat. During class is best.

3. Be sure to ask why men are wearing dresses? [/B]

Hehehe :)

4. When someone makes a mistake, point and laugh - the louder the better.
Thus you will clearly demonstrate your superior knowledge of the technique.

5. Bring some donuts and start giving them out during class. People often tend to get hungry during technique, and so doing this will help you gain many new friends !

6. Drink a bottle of vodka before coming in. It will help you stay more relaxed.

7. If your instructor suggests a size 3 uniform, make sure to get one which is at least 2 sizes bigger.
Also, avoid laundry at all costs.
This will help you intimidate your opponents.

8. Remember,tying the belt is easy - it's just like tying your shoes.
Anyone who does it otherwise, is probably a weirdo and you should try and avoid pairing up with them.

Simone
01-10-2001, 03:44 AM
Hi!

Just take some advices of my previous speakers not too serious!

Honestly, I did not hear of Aikido before nor did I watch classes before. I just started with a beginnes class at the University. That was the best I could do. I don't think I had started Aikido if I had had more informations before. So why not ask for the next beginners class (it's a little bit easier, I think, than starting in a regular class) and just go? Don't waste too much time on thoughts now, this will come with practice, at least for me.

A very good advice which you already got is, if there is more than one dojo, check them all. What Aikido is for you can strongly depend on the teacher and the fellow Aikido students. The group and the teacher I started with are really excellent, so I was very lucky. Just look what fits you best.

Don't hesitate to ask someone in the dojo about their etiquette and everything you want to know. You also can check the information on this website.

Just my opinion, needn't be right.

Simone

PRapoza
01-10-2001, 07:39 AM
I agree with Erik and DiNalt. Don't take yourself or Aikido to seriously. Make sure you find a dojo and instructor that both challenge you and welcome you. Enjoy yourself. You will find a dojo that suits you if you look around enough. A dojo is more than a place to train. It is a community and can resemble a family. Pick a good one.
__________
Paul
http://www.aikidokenkyukai.org/usa/ma/ma.index.html

JJF
02-09-2001, 04:12 AM
Hi!

There have been some great advice above and I just want to add this: when you look for a dojo don't mistake rank for quality. If you can choose between a 5th. dan or a 4th. dan sensei then don't asume the 5th. dan is better for you. Try to get an understanding of the spirit in the dojo and the senesei's perception of Aikido, Then choose with your heart. I was lucky to walk into a dojo where I felt right at home from the start. We have a very competent instructor who is not just very knowing in Aikido but also a great person with a very nice blend of humor and seriousness. (can you say that ?).

Best of luck