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Aikidoka2000
01-02-2001, 05:51 PM
Are you Japan Crazy?
The Warning signs:
1. You begin beating the living daylights out of all those who dare to walk across
your threshold with their shoes on, with a foam rubber bokken.
2.You lounge around the house in a yukata in the summer,sipping Mugicha, and a
Hanten in the winter drinking various and all kinds of Cha.
3. You find nothing at all wrong with bathing three times a day, scrubbing your
skin until you look like a giant cooked Ebi.
4. You secretly look at your friends who don't shower three times a day as
Kitanai hito.
5. You use Ohashi for everything including yard work and cooking.
6. You scoff at American made products and revel in European and Japanese
made ones.
7. You cannot stomach any of the "swill" that Americans call food.
8.You obsess about how lazy, fat, and stupid your co-workers are.
9.To you Rice and Shiro Miso and Nori are life, and you never want fries with
that.
10. You sleep with one eye open, for fear of Godzilla/Ninja/Jishin attacks.
11. You think the Ice cream man bell sound is really the
Ramen/jagaimo/TakoYaki/Oden seller
12. You feel dishonored and want to commit Seppuku when you promise
something you cannot deliver no matter how trivial.
13. You laugh at Americans obsession with "Pokemon": because you know that it
is at least ten years past its popularity in Japan.
14. You Bob you head and say "Un!" when asked a question by anyone.
15. You own no couch, or else no furniture about the height of your stomach. but
rather a big pile of Zabuton in piled up in the corner.
16. If you frequently fall asleep in the kotatsu.
17. If the only beer you'll drink in Asahi, followed by a pickled Squid Intestines,
and a Sake Chaser.
18. If you never get mad, then suddenly explode from your patience ended,
throwing everything around the house.
19. If the expression "Shoganai!" Is common lament.
20.If you friends suddenly look at you all funny because you just finished the last
half of the meeting in Japanese.
21.If you pay $65.00 for a haircut engineered by a Sun Solaris computer that
takes three people 3.5 hours to complete, with the layering details done down to
the DNA strands
22.If you have the urge to confine yourself in a small, dark box, and sing songs to
a T.V. screen while getting blitzed.
23.If you look at the tree in your from yard during Autumn and get misty eyed as
the leaves fall down.
24. If you have the preponderance to study with great care every life form
residing in your house, paying special attention not to kill any spiders.
25. You section off your rooms with Shoji screens.
-If you or a loved one is suffering from any of the above symptoms, do not
attempt to intervene alone. Call our 24 support center at 1-800-HenaGaijin today
to receive your free kit on how to bring your loved one into our facilities to be
reprogrammed. Kit also comes with 10 emergency Taco-Bell coupons, A
Western set of Cowboy Boots, and video tapes of "Gilligan's Island" and the
"Brady Bunch"
Also comes with a "Dukes of Hazard" Poster.
Don't let this disease take your Fried-Chicken eating, two shower a week T.V.
Loving Beer Drinking Red Blooded Good old boy you know and love.
Call now, before it's too late.
-Sushi A.K.A Tomu :D

[Edited by Aikidoka2000 on January 2, 2001 at 04:55pm]

akiy
01-02-2001, 06:17 PM
Thread moved to "Chit Chat" section.

-- Jun

PS: Tom, you don't need to hit "Enter" when the line reaches the right-hand side of the text entry box. Doing so adds hard returns which break up the lines in odd places for some people.

Nick
01-02-2001, 10:48 PM
uh oh, someone found me out... I'd come shut you down, but my computer's on the fritz-- stupid American made product...

heh heh.

Nick

Simone
01-03-2001, 03:16 AM
Hi!

I think, you just forget two things:
1. If you say "moshi, moshi" if you get calls by phone
2. If you bow while telephoning

But beside the jokes, I find the Japanese culture (including language and scripture) very fascinating. Since I spent my last holiday in Japan I miss a hot bath every single evening for over a year now!

Thanks for the nice entertainement,

Simone

bones
01-03-2001, 01:21 PM
Guilty.

There seems to be a large population of Japan-o-philes world wide. Probably way more than could fit in the country itself. I often ask myself how it is I became so infatuated with a culture from a place I've (sadly) never even been.

1. A local karate instructor actually came to my high school to teach a few weeks of phys ed. class. At the end he had a little 'kata contest' with the winner receiving a few months free lessons. I won quite handily.. he made my parents vouch that I had never practiced before. I guess I took right to it...

2. I read a lot of Gary Snyder when I was young and became interested in Zen Buddhism. I practiced at a Soto Zen temple in New Orleans for a while, which was a traditional Japanese form of the practice.

3. When reading a popular physics book (A. Zee's 'Fearful Symmetry') in high school it made a metaphor between 'good science' and some mysterious game called 'go'. Many years later, in college, i recalled this to a friend... who i then found out played while growing up in Austria. He taught me, and i've been an addict ever since...

I think these three experiences working with a general curiosity for 'different' things (this admittedly probably derives from an egotistic self-image as a sort of cultured weirdo) doomed me to Japan-o-philia. I've since studied the language and (obv) taken up Aikido as well.

I think ultimately I found that the very distinctive 'Japanese way' happens to fit my personality. I could go on about why I think Japan in particular seems to draw in people like this... but this post is long enough, I'll give a chance for someone else to perhaps comment on the subject...

-e preston

bones
01-03-2001, 01:32 PM
I should also mention how strange it is to me that the japanese are so obsessed with western culture! Why on earth would you prefer shallow market driven pop culture fads that last a few weeks over thousands of years of one of the most unique cultures on the planet, linked with the mountains and the sea where you live??? Perhaps indicative that the japanese have mastered marketing mind-control even better then us?

-e preston

leefr
01-04-2001, 12:52 AM
Perhaps the fact that they've been living in an oppressive and inbred culture for thousands of years might account for their searching for a little refreshment(in the form of Coca-Cola).

Kyung Yul Lee

Chris Li
01-04-2001, 05:44 AM
bones wrote:
I should also mention how strange it is to me that the japanese are so obsessed with western culture! Why on earth would you prefer shallow market driven pop culture fads that last a few weeks over thousands of years of one of the most unique cultures on the planet, linked with the mountains and the sea where you live??? Perhaps indicative that the japanese have mastered marketing mind-control even better then us?

-e preston

The Japanese have always absorbed foreign cultures. Even the writing system and language have been heavily contorted to accomodate first Chinese and then other foreign languages.

Is it really so odd that the Japanese are enraptured with the culture that really dominated the globe throughout the 20th century? Not only did the US catalyze the final opening of Japan to the outside world and the changeover from the shogunate, but it beat back their aims of an international empire, rebuilt the country afterward and all but dictated word for word the structure of their present constitution.

I'd think it a little bit odd if they were _less_ interested in that culture then they were.

Best,

Chris

Young-In Park
01-04-2001, 04:13 PM
Last year, I found it ironic that I, an Asian-American, was telling a self-professed Japan-o-phille Caucasian instructor that he was American and lived in America.

While others should be "more Japanese," its OK for him to behave like the stereotypical ugly American around visiting Japanese shihans.

Bruce Lee said in an interview, something to this effect, "Ultimately, martial arts is about honestly expressing yourself."

Young-In Park

tedehara
01-04-2001, 06:52 PM
Young-In Park wrote:
Last year, I found it ironic that I, an Asian-American, was telling a self-professed Japan-o-phille Caucasian instructor that he was American and lived in America.

While others should be "more Japanese," its OK for him to behave like the stereotypical ugly American around visiting Japanese shihans.

Bruce Lee said in an interview, something to this effect, "Ultimately, martial arts is about honestly expressing yourself."

Young-In Park

I recall reading that the US and Japanese societies are at opposite extremes of each other. For an American, the Japanese life and culture is an exotic, out-of-the-ordinary way of living and the same could hold true for a Japanese about America.

By having an interest in something outside our daily lives, it seems to create a fresh perspective that we can use to enrichen our own lives. I recall being in Europe and realizing that a Ford could be considered desirable there because it was an imported car.

Perhaps you were upset with this ..."self-professed Japan-o-phille Caucasian instructor... because he was acting in a way you didn't expect. But isn't part of being an American acting in some crazy way? ;)

I could just as easily tell Mick Jagger and Keith Richards to forget about Rhythm & Blues because they're a couple of English chaps instead of Black bluesmen. However, what the Stones bring to Rhythm & Blues is their enthusiasm and respect. Both the music and the people are better for it.

This could happen in the martial arts also, but that's up to you. :cool:

Erik
01-04-2001, 09:15 PM
Young-In Park wrote:
Last year, I found it ironic that I, an Asian-American, was telling a self-professed Japan-o-phille Caucasian instructor that he was American and lived in America.

While others should be "more Japanese," its OK for him to behave like the stereotypical ugly American around visiting Japanese shihans.

Bruce Lee said in an interview, something to this effect, "Ultimately, martial arts is about honestly expressing yourself."

Young-In Park

You remind me of something I saw after a seminar. The Japanese shihan was getting in a car and there were people adjusting his seat, buckling his seat belt, closing the door and for all I know someone held his wang when he went to the john. The thing that struck me about it was the look on his face, which to my eyes said, "Well look at this, it's a Japanese car, I bet I could somehow manage this all by myself."

I thought of yelling, "he bends wrists for a living, enough already." I'm probably better off for not having said that.

[Edited by Erik on January 5, 2001 at 12:34am]

Nick
01-04-2001, 09:20 PM
during my journeys, it seems to me that people only want what they don't have. A homeless man may desire money for a house and car, but the millionaire who walks past him probably places little to no importance on his money. The budoka, when beginning his journey, wants to master the waza, the physical technique. However, to someone with a solid base and understanding of technique, the waza doesn't seem as important, he looks for something else during his practice. Perhaps it's that same idea when looking at Japan and America. Americans, for the most part, live a pretty hectic life, and they see in the budo perhaps a stillness, a step back from their way of life into something different, something refreshing. Having never lived in Japan and not being Japanese, I cannot comment on their thoughts or feelings, but perhaps they seek the same thing.

Nick

Young-In Park
01-05-2001, 12:23 AM
Perhaps you were upset with this ..."self-professed Japan-o-phille Caucasian instructor... because he was acting in a way you didn't expect. But isn't part of being an American acting in some crazy way? ;)

I could just as easily tell Mick Jagger and Keith Richards to forget about Rhythm & Blues because they're a couple of English chaps instead of Black bluesmen. However, what the Stones bring to Rhythm & Blues is their enthusiasm and respect. Both the music and the people are better for it.

This could happen in the martial arts also, but that's up to you. :cool: [/B][/QUOTE]

There's a major difference between the Rolling Stones and the instructor in question - The Rolling Stones are good musicians whereas the instructor doesn't even act Japanese.

My main bone of contention with the instructor is that he tells everyone they should be "more Japanese" even though he doesn't. It is the hypocrisy that really irks me (maybe he's Asian afterall...).

I thought being American is doing your own thing and not hoisting your beliefs upon other people...

wouldn't tell the Rolling Stones how to play,
Young-In Park

REK
01-05-2001, 08:40 AM
Young-In Park wrote:
I thought being American is doing your own thing and not hoisting your beliefs upon other people...


Uh, actually, it appears that the American way is to do your own thing and be angry that not everyone appreciates it when you hoist your beliefs upon other people...

Which is why we shrinks have jobs.


Rob

Young-In Park
01-05-2001, 11:56 AM
Uh, actually, it appears that the American way is to do your own thing and be angry that not everyone appreciates it when you hoist your beliefs upon other people...

Which is why we shrinks have jobs.

I need to make an appointment with you... =)

Young-In Park

Gene McGloin
01-05-2001, 09:42 PM
Hi,

My wife is a bit concerned as she believes that I demonstrate at least 12 of the listed symptoms! The first thing that tipped her off was that her family in Japan in branded me "cho hen na gaijin" last year when we visited. Seems that my taste for shiokara minus the sake was too much for them to accept coming from a gaijin! Even chased down a yaki imo truck, too. She's not crazy about the cowboy boots, though!

Yeah, I miss o-furo too!

Akemashita omedetou!

Gene

PRapoza
01-06-2001, 03:21 PM
The crazy thing about this whole topic is that pretending to be someone or something that we are not is contradictory to the principles of aikido. I have in the past wished I were Japanese. Friends and family used to tell me I should have been born 100 yrs. ago etc... I'm sure many of you can relate. Facing the truth of my life was very difficult. The truth being that I am not Japanese and I was born exactly at the right time and place. I enjoy my life now. As for aikido, it is not Japanese. Aikido is to me the exploration and discovery of who I am. Not who I think I am or who I want to be or anything else. It is very simple and very difficult. It is a striping away of power, vanity, expectations (ego), an unveiling of what remains. Being able to see ourselves can be painful, exciting, joyous, sad, enraging but ultimately freeing and peaceful. And so the way continues. Practice, practice, practice.
_______________
Paul