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Luke Derham
09-23-2003, 10:11 AM
Hello everyone!

Next year i am travelling abroad from my jhome in australia to study aikido further. I was hoping to train at San Diego dojo with Chiba Sensei and was wondering if anyone knew if you can live there at the dojo? i was hoping to train there for a quite a while, possibly 6 months. if anyone has trained there i would be grateful for the feedback, and if anyone has information on living at the dojo and the training schedule that would be absolutely awesome!
Also, if you have any knowledge of dojos that have training sessions throughout the day, that would be most appreciated

thank you for your time,
luke.

akiy
09-23-2003, 11:09 AM
I believe that in order to live at the dojo, you have to be a kenshusei at the dojo. From what I saw when I was there, that meant you had to train at every single class, do work around the dojo, and basically do anything else that had to be done there.

In any case, you should probably contact the folks there to see if there are any prerequisites and such that have to be filled before enrolling in their program. It looks like you can find contact information here:

http://www.usafwr.org/sandiego/

-- Jun

Roy Dean
09-29-2003, 01:19 PM
Luke,

I live in San Diego, and actually live fairly close to Chiba Sensei's dojo. I've watched a few classes and made a number of observations that might aid your decision making process.

1. The dojo itself is beautiful with traditional Japanese architecture.

2. They do have uchideshi. When I witnessed classes, there were 2 or 3 that had come in from Poland. A friend of mine trained there for a few years and noted that it was a very international dojo.

3. After watching a basic Saturday morning class taught by a female instructor, I was interested in signing up for the occasional Aikido class (I've studied Aikido at length before, but am currently focusing on Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu). However, after witnessing an open mat time, the abuse heaped by one of the senior instructors on multiple training partners was too much for me to handle. I left disgusted and never looked back.

This was a great disappointment to me, as I had looked forward to visiting his dojo years before moving to San Diego. I'm a big fan of dynamic, hard-style Aikido, and Chiba's reputation for this kind of Aikido is well known. The sadistic instructor I saw (not Chiba Sensei, he was in Europe doing a seminar) was highly skilled, but his skill seemed to come at the expense of his training partner's bodies. This is not the kind of environment that's most beneficial for gaining an applicable skill, in my opinion, and definitely not the preferred environment for an uchideshi.

I served 15 months as an uchideshi for Julio Toribio (5th Dan, Aikikai, et al) and it was a fantastic experience. The life of an uchideshi is rigorous enough under the "every class, every day" training demands, so finding the proper growth oriented, injury free training program is the most important decision you can make. Sensei Toribio's uchideshi program has a waiting list, but it is worthy of investigation.

Sunset Cliffs Aikido is another San Diego alternative. It's certainly the largest dojo I have ever been in, and it has an uchideshi program, with some uchideshi staying as long as 5 years! Excellent facilities plus the Sensei, Bernice Tom, really knows her stuff. Every time I've watched her, I've been impressed.

There are plenty of uchideshi programs offered by notable instructors, including Gaku Homma, Pat Hendricks, and more. Take your time and explore all of your options.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me directly at uchideshi@hotmail.com. I've included some addresses that might interest you.

Good training to you,

Roy Dean

http://www.sunsetcliffsaikido.com/

http://www.nippon-kan.org/

http://www.aikido-sanleandro.com/

http://www.seibukanjujutsu.com/

BC
09-30-2003, 01:23 PM
I have never trained under Chiba Sensei, but, just to be fair to Chiba Sensei and his students, I have attended classes taught by a number of his senior students, and was never subject to any abuse by the instructors or their students. I have heard that Chiba Sensei can be "vigorous" when practicing techniques on his senior students. But only when he is confident they can take the proper ukemi. My own sensei was known to do this, as are many other experienced aikido instructors. IMHO.

rachmass
09-30-2003, 01:32 PM
I have to agree with BC on this one. Chiba Sensei has always been kind and gracious with me. He has thrown me a little harder than I expected (the times that he comes around during a seminar and tosses different people-not ukemi in front of the class), but never outside of my abilities. I really think he dishes out what he feels his students need at each given part of their training. My main teacher was a student of Chiba Sensei, and he was never abusive physically to any of his students.

James Kelly
10-01-2003, 04:17 PM
Not trying to fuel the fire but... When I was a 5th kyu I met a guy rollerblading who said he was an aikido sensei. In payment for some skating pointers, he invited me to his new dojo. I had no idea who he was, or even what style he did and was happy to attend. I wore a white belt, no hakama and was as humble as I could possibly be. I have never been so badly treated on the mat as I was that night. If I had known better, I would have bowed to him and sat through the class.

He was a high ranking Chiba student. I have no knowledge of Chiba himself, or his dojo, but training under this man would be detrimental to one’s health and I could not recommend it. I should say that I enjoy training hard and love to get thrown around and my initial teacher was a Chiba student who always acted kindly, but there is a difference between hard training and dangerous training and he crossed the line with a rank beginner.

Just something to keep in mind if you decide to train there.

Kujo
10-01-2003, 05:37 PM
Hi all,

San Diego is a very dynamic place to train in aikido, with many choices of dojo and senseis. Here in no order of preference are various places in addition to those already mentioned (where I could find the web pages with contact information):

North County Aikikai, Coryl Crane

http://www.usafwr.org/northcounty/

Ryushinkan, Martin Katz

http://fun2do.com/ryushinkan/

Seishin Aikido, Walter Muryasz

http://www.seishindo.com/

Aikido of Mission Valley, Dave Goldberg

http://www.aikido-missionvalley.com

plus lots more associated with YMCAs, colleges, and community centers. I would recommend that one come watch a class before participating if one is new to the art and see if you "groove to the moves". If you don't see how you could blend, move on -- there's another sensei who'd be happy to have you. If anyone else wants to add to this list, please do, so our visitor from Aussieland can maximize his opportunity to train harmoniously while "up over". (bad joke, couldn't resist). And speaking from hard experience, it's never bad manners to bow to your partner and decline to train with them with thanks. You do not need to explain your reasons.

rachmass
10-01-2003, 07:33 PM
"Next year i am travelling abroad from my jhome in australia to study aikido further. I was hoping to train at San Diego dojo with Chiba Sensei and was wondering if anyone knew if you can live there at the dojo?"

This is how the thread was started; somehow we all got off topic of what the original writer intended.

Did you ever get the answer you were looking for? Contact the dojo?

best of luck, Rachel

Alan Lomax
10-02-2003, 12:16 AM
Hello everyone!

Next year i am travelling abroad from my jhome in australia to study aikido further. I was hoping to train at San Diego dojo with Chiba Sensei and was wondering if anyone knew if you can live there at the dojo?
Luke,

As mentioned in some of the responses above, do check out the websites that were listed. they will answer all of your questions.

http://www.usafwr.org/sandiego/ This one in particular is very useful because it is Chiba Sensei's Dojo web page.

I have trained at Chiba Sensei's Dojo. I was only fortunate enough to spend about a year and a half training there. While there I was very fortunate to get a good deal of hands on, direct training from Chiba Sensei. Yes, he is that good that it may frighten some poeple at first. As he leads you through the waza, he gives guidance. If you listen to his guidance he helps you through the whole experience. After and even before practice Chiba Sensei is very aproachable and has a warm diarming manner.

The instructors and students that are a part of this Dojo are a good reflection of the man who heads it. They do have strong effective application.

Alan Lomax
10-02-2003, 07:28 AM
After and even before practice Chiba Sensei is very aproachable and has a warm diarming manner.
My appologies, what I meant to type was "DISSARMING" manner, not diarming.

Gomen ne

dion
12-29-2003, 10:31 PM
I have trained at san diego aikikai for 8 years now and yes it can be hard at times but that's how we like it, realistic IMHO.

Roy, I'm sorry you feel what you saw was wrong. We only give what our partner can take (and wants most of the time) and never "try" to hurt anybody. I myself like most of our students want to train hard, for me, the harder the better but within reason on our bodies. We have this flow where we train very hard but still with love of our partner.

Every person trains at their own speed, sometimes I move very slow and smooth and other times I move very fast and hard, it all depends on who I'm training with.

I have studied other arts including BJJ and found it boring next to our training, not to diss other styles, please don't take it that way. But what I wanted out of MA I found at our Dojo.

Thalib
12-30-2003, 05:05 AM
I've trained with a student of Chiba Sensei of San Diego Dojo, and I don't see nor feel anything that was described as harmful or dangerous, we were not even training as aggresive as some has posted.

So maybe it is not good to generalize. As we know, it is the person not the martial art.

John Longford
12-30-2003, 09:05 AM
Hi Luke,

I can not speak for Sensei Chiba's Dojo but do check out Sunset Cliffs Aikido. The phone number is (619) 223 5085 and the address is 5019 Santa Monica Avenue, San Diego, CA 92107.

Not only is Sensei Bernice Tom a very good teacher but the enthusiasm from the whole club has to be experienced. The Dojo is large with good facilities and location (the beach is at the end of the block!).

I first visited in 1991, then was uchi-deshi for my holidays in 93,95,96,97 & 98.

I last trained there in June this year so I can definitely recommend it.

Anyway, whatever you decide, good luck,

Regards,

John

Cessna
01-06-2004, 12:20 PM
Not to de-rail this thread, but:

Years ago I visited a school in North County San Diego - Leucadia. I *think* it was called "Four Winds," but I could be wrong.

Has anyone heard of this school...?

Bronson
01-06-2004, 04:05 PM
Years ago I visited a school in North County San Diego - Leucadia. I *think* it was called "Four Winds," but I could be wrong.
I believe that may be the dojo (http://www.dojoofthefourwinds.com/index.html) where James Williams from Bugei Trading Co. teaches

Bronson

dion
01-07-2004, 09:26 PM
I believe that may be the dojo (http://www.dojoofthefourwinds.com/index.html) where James Williams from Bugei Trading Co. teaches

Bronson
I think you're correct. I used to work up in north county and he had a buisness in our complex.

I trained at the Four Winds Dojo for about a year.

Jeff Sodeman
01-08-2004, 01:34 AM
I'm the head instructor at Jiai Aikido in San Diego. We're an ASU dojo opened last July with Ikeda sensei's help. If you're interested in dropping in to check us out feel free to contact me.

We're in the process of expanding our dojo into a new location, but will continue having class in the meantime. We may also have live-in student positions available at our new location.

I have dropped in for classes at Sunset Cliffs, Aikido of Mission Valley, and San Diego Aikikai and have students that also train at those dojos. I can give you my thoughts on them if you want.

People come into aikido for many reasons and looking for different things. Finding a good dojo is about finding a place that matches well with what your personal interests and goals are.