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villrg0a
09-22-2003, 02:20 AM
Hi all,

Our sensei instructed us to prepare ourselves to execute series locking as part of our test. I would like to get some input if I am doing the right thing.

Right hand attack, uke delivers a jab/punch, i grab is punching arm (gliding outside) and lock him with a leading sankyo, then nikkyo, then shihonage, then he goes down - without releasing the shihonage hold, i convert it back to sankyo to force him to get up then I end it up with a koshi nage. I am I doing the right thing?

Many thanks in advance for those who will reply.

ian
09-22-2003, 05:14 AM
Never seen it taught this way but I'm sure it is quite useful - the pin techniques do lead into one another (I think the choice of which pin you use in a practical situation can depend on the way the hand happens to be at the time). I'd be interested in more info. on this 'series locking' stuff and if anyone else does it.

Ian

villrg0a
09-22-2003, 06:17 AM
All the while I thought this is practiced all over. The series locking helps us develop control, form, distance and positioning, proper locking, etc... I know in an actual fight you may not need to go into series, but this exercise could still be useful.

Anyone please?

aikidoc
09-22-2003, 07:21 AM
Sounds like you are practicing henka waza.

Bronson
09-22-2003, 11:10 AM
I would like to get some input if I am doing the right thing.

Ask your sensei. That's what they're there for.

Bronson

Abasan
09-29-2003, 12:49 AM
Do you actually force your uke unto does moves, or do you wait until uke offers considerable resistance in the first move before moving to the second?

Kensai
09-29-2003, 01:35 PM
I did a cool type kensetsu/nage waza kata recently.

Starts with Shomen, then Nage Ikkyo's, Nikkyo's and Sankyo's Uke, Uke escaping each one. Then from Sankyo into Yonkyo and Uke does a forward Ukemi and come back at Nage with Tsuki and Nage Shihonages him.

Then Uke comes again with Tsuki and Nage does tenchinage and kaiten nage, each time uke following and escaping the technique, then tsuki again and nage kokyunages him but Uke turn's IN to escape and delivers another tsuki where you Kote gaeshi to finish. Pretty cool.

Does this have a Japanese name?

paw
09-29-2003, 02:17 PM
Does this have a Japanese name?

I believe the name is kata.

:eek:

Regards,

Paul

villrg0a
09-30-2003, 01:13 AM
We try to keep the pressure light, if uke fights or resist the technique we go the other way around instead of forcing the technique.

But when we do counters, we wait for a while until the lock is near completion before we counter, and then he counters again (e.g. i sankyo uke, he counters with a sankyo)...

bluwing27
09-30-2003, 06:39 AM
I believe the name is kata.

:eek:
We do this kata/series locking whatever you want to call it occasionally too.

We have quite a famous one that seems to pop up occasioanlly on courses or just in classes:

From Yokomen attack -

1. Shiho nage keeping control of uke's wrist as he falls and rolls, then

2. Taisabaki around the outside of the controlled arm to lead your partner and perform kote gaeshi , keeping hold and control of partners wrist while roll is executed, then

3. Quick hand change to perform nikyo, then nikyo submission, then

4. Swap grasp to get sankyo which you then use to persuade ;) uke onto his/her feet, then

5. Step behind partner, leading them round and perform irimi nage!

And thats it in a skeletal form although there are infinite variations on this theme with the obvious ones using kaiten nage in place of irimi nage etc.etc.etc....the list is endless!

:D

Anyway thats a one we use a lot and its fun! Give it a go :)

We also train to be able to change from any one lock into any other as they all can flow into one another and it can come in useful when your training with an uke built like the hulk on which nikyo seems to be ineffective but they have a particularly sensitive yonko nerve! :D

At the end of the day these exercises are not to learn technique they are to teach you about control of your partner, how to achieve it and how to maintain it.

Chris

villrg0a
10-06-2003, 10:58 PM
we find this a good exercise too, helps as adapt to situations expecially when resistance is encountered.

Christopher,

do you guys ever put this on video, if you do you mind sharing it? Thanks.

L. Camejo
10-07-2003, 07:37 AM
As a basic part of Shodokan randorigeiko training we do a similar exercise called Toshu Hiki Tate Geiko, where there is no Tori or Uke, just 2 people attemtping to apply techniques and avoiding and countering in a fluid, constantly moving process. In this practice though we use both kansetsu (joint) and atemi (striking) waza.

This is a great exercise to help practiitoners to get a feel for the process a technique takes to the point of effectiveness, and how to skillfully avoid/negate a technique while placing oneself in position for a counter based on the other's movements. The development of combination responses to attack is another benefit of this. This exercise is also done with one person attacking with tanto as well.

Very interesting and cool stuff.

L.C.:ai::ki:

paw
10-07-2003, 08:54 AM
As a basic part of Shodokan randorigeiko training we do a similar exercise called Toshu Hiki Tate Geiko, where there is no Tori or Uke, just 2 people attemtping to apply techniques and avoiding and countering in a fluid, constantly moving process. In this practice though we use both kansetsu (joint) and atemi (striking) waza.

FWIW, I prefer this approach to a set, preplanned kata. In the type of dynamic training Larry describes, students are allowed to become very creative and learn to flow with what "is" rather than "what should be". Done properly, this type of dynamic training is a lot like playing.

Regards,

Paul

villrg0a
04-13-2004, 06:42 AM
Thank you for your replies - even though it's a bit late :)

thisisnotreal
04-13-2004, 06:59 AM
how did it go on your test, Romuel?

villrg0a
04-13-2004, 07:07 AM
hi josh - thanks for asking, i passed the 3rd kyu test. im working on towards the 2nd now this coming april 23, gosh it suddenly came to me that i spent 7 months on 3rd kyu, 3 X per week session - wish me luck. regards!