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Ari Bolden
09-18-2003, 06:36 PM
Is it humility or cockiness to go into a dojo and not tell the instructor your background?

Is this a way not to be treated any differently from other "beginners"? Do people do this in order to gauge the class?

This question is for those who have a lot of grappling in their classes (anyone can answer though ;-)

I had a new student come to my class. He told me he had some karate background.

I had him spar at the end of class with another beginner. He didn't look all that "seasoned" but he did manage to get my student into a rear choke.

Then (as I like to do), we sparred. I like to gauge different people as a part of my learning. We started and then I feel him throw on a triangle choke. I actually commented " there's more than meets the eye here."

I underestimated my uke (oppentent). My idleness got me into a nice armbar by him.

It was a lesson in humility for me.

He was playing possum and I found out a couple days later that he teaches grappling in another dojo.

Any ideas or comments?

Lesson learned...
Ari

BKimpel
09-18-2003, 06:46 PM
It isn’t cockiness, or he would have openly challenged you and then whooped your butt.

They are simply testing themselves and their abilities WITHOUT causing you any unnecessary embarrassment (or themselves for that matter if they got whooped). He wanted to put his money where his mouth was without making some spectacle event out of it (which always ends making people feel threatened, and people get nasty too quickly when threatened).

What’s the harm? You learned a little (not to underestimate uke), and he learned a little.

Now if it went any further than that (i.e. he suddenly proclaims that your dojo is wimpy cause he bested you guys…that’s another issue :)

Bruce

sanosuke
09-18-2003, 09:05 PM
"They are simply testing themselves and their abilities WITHOUT causing you any unnecessary embarrassment (or themselves for that matter if they got whooped). He wanted to put his money where his mouth was without making some spectacle event out of it (which always ends making people feel threatened, and people get nasty too quickly when threatened)."

that's the positive one, but some peole do this because they want to prove that their school is best among others, that he had beaten sensei 'A' of this art, arm-barred sensei 'B' of this art and so on. I'm not really against this because if you do with honest intention this will create stronger friendship among each martial art.
Now if it went any further than that (i.e. he suddenly proclaims that your dojo is wimpy cause he bested you guys…that’s another issue

that's the problem with these so called 'dojo buster', they are nice at the beginning but turned to be an asshole in the end. If it happen then it's not humility anymore but more to cockiness i guess, this 'testing' attitude is a double edged sword to me.

Uke4life
09-19-2003, 04:16 PM
I have switched to a couple of different dojos yet, I always tell them a little of what I have done, yet always request to be started from the beginning like a beginner. I have the mentality that everyone teaches different and for me to walk and act like I know what I am doing I think is cockiness. I hope it doesn't sound like I am trying to be arrogant, b/c in all truth I do it with all best intentions in mind. Train Safe!!!

Clayton Drescher
09-19-2003, 05:35 PM
I've been shopping dojos lately and I've always been *asked* by sensei or senior students if I've had any martial arts experience. So not telling really hasn't been an issue I've come across. And I mean *every* dojo, where I'm from and have I done aikido or anything else before.

Best,

Clayton

Ari Bolden
09-19-2003, 05:38 PM
Cheers! Great feedback....

respectfully,

Ari B.