PDA

View Full Version : Pictures from Tomiki Championships


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


PeterR
09-17-2003, 07:06 PM
I didn't go but someone pointed me to a site full of picis from the Aikido World Championships (Tomiki) in Leeds last summer.

http://www.wakefield-aikido.co.uk/gallery.htm

The pictures, quite naturally, are weighted towards members of their club so I only recognize a few people but check out the bald guy.

PeterR
09-17-2003, 07:41 PM
My favourite.

Hanna B
09-17-2003, 08:52 PM
Hey, I thought you guys never wore a hakama?

paw
09-17-2003, 08:56 PM
Sweet!

Chuck Clark
09-17-2003, 11:57 PM
My favourite.
Hi Peter,

As you know, I'm "picky". I don't care for kata where the uke puts his hand on the tori's back and vaults over the tori in an athletic manuever that is more suited to a gymnastics routine instead of real ukemi from a real technique.

I downloaded the video and put it in half speed and then watched it frame by frame because it looked too "theatrical" to me.

I'm "ducking for cover."

PeterR
09-18-2003, 02:02 AM
For randori and general practice we don't. It's unusual but you sometimes see it for enbu demonstrations - personal choice.

I think those in hakama are not pure Shodokan but they are definately Tomiki. Not everyone who considers themselves Tomiki follow the Shodokan path but of course that doesn't stop everyone from getting togeather.

Interestingly Nariyama Shihan has been quoted as saying if you wear the hakama you better be good as it implies a level of formality. From the picis these guys had no problem.

The Shodokan Honbu people (including Shihan) did not wear hakama during Enbu.
Hey, I thought you guys never wore a hakama?

batemanb
09-18-2003, 02:04 AM
Hi Peter,

I don't know who the bald chappie is, but the gentleman in the red T-shirt standing behind him is Bob Jones, 6th Dan, and current Chairman of the British Aikido Association.

http://www.wakefield-aikido.co.uk/gallery/Fgallery3-8.jpg

He was the tutor for my coaching course, and had the pleasure of doing a Tomiki "workshop" with him after. His son, Simon on the left below) is also a long time practicioner having started at age 7 (if I remember correctly), now in mid twenties.

http://www.wakefield-aikido.co.uk/gallery/Fgallery8-8.jpg

Some dynamic looking pics there, my fav, just for the facial expression is:

http://www.wakefield-aikido.co.uk/gallery/Fgallery6-8.jpg

As for the hakama, I'm sure they told me they only wear them for the kata competitions.

Regards

Bryan

PeterR
09-18-2003, 02:09 AM
Hi Chuck;

Favourite of the pictures - no comment on the waza. Like Bryan I love the facial expression.

Yann Golanski
09-18-2003, 04:57 AM
talking about Hakama and Tomiki... does anyone know why Tomiki decided not to use a hakama?

PeterR
09-18-2003, 05:01 AM
It really is a question about safety in randori.

asiawide
09-18-2003, 10:20 AM
One of the man who wore hakama looks like David Fielding. I heard that he was the national team coach of UK. I saw him once but his techniques were very dynamic and accurate. His demo made me like Tomiki aikido. :)

Jaemin

Martin L
09-18-2003, 01:26 PM
Simon & Marks kata was very nice to watch, but you're right about it almost entering the realms of acrobatics in places. They keep winning the open kata event, so its about time that someone gave them a proper challenge there. 2 years to work on it I suppose.;)

Pretty much all of the people in the photos are BAA members (yes, it was only them that wore Hakama for their kata), which is why you don't really see anything of the Japanese teams or us Shodokan GB lot.

I should hopefully have some photos of us other competitors soon.

deepsoup
09-18-2003, 01:40 PM
I don't know who the bald chappie is, but the gentleman in the red T-shirt standing behind him is Bob Jones, 6th Dan, and current Chairman of the British Aikido Association.
The 'bald chappie' is Mark Watson, one of the club instructors over in Wakefield. The referee in the background was indeed Bob Jones, and given that his son was one of the competitors theres no way he should have been refereeing at that moment in time. I'm not suggesting he was anything other than scrupulously impartial (especially not on a public forum), but seriously - would you find someone sitting on the judging panel at, say, an international ice-skating competition awarding points to their son or daughter? Not a chance.
As you know, I'm "picky". I don't care for kata where the uke puts his hand on the tori's back and vaults over the tori in an athletic manuever that is more suited to a gymnastics routine instead of real ukemi from a real technique.

I downloaded the video and put it in half speed and then watched it frame by frame because it looked too "theatrical" to me.

I'm "ducking for cover."
May I join you under that cover, Mr Clark?

I agree entirely. I don't want to take anything away from Mr Watson and Mr Jones' performance, its undeniably very impressive, but I had trouble identifying the aikido technique being performed in places. (I don't have the bandwidth for the video, so I'm just going on having been there on the day and seen it 'in the flesh' as it were.)

For my money, there were other jiyu enbu performed on the day that I much preferred. In my opinion, I think it should be possible to replace the uke in an enbu with someone who has good ukemi but no knowledge of the technique about to be performed, have them provide a sincere attack, and the outcome should look about the same.
I think those in hakama are not pure Shodokan but they are definately Tomiki. Not everyone who considers themselves Tomiki follow the Shodokan path but of course that doesn't stop everyone from getting togeather.
Over here in the UK we Shodokan 'purists' (ie: look to honbu and Nariyama Shihan for technical guidance, use the JAA grading syllabus, emphasise the kihon kozo in our training etc.) are actually quite a small minority of the "Tomiki style" aikidoists, although we're all affiliated to the same organisation. (Mostly we're part of a sub-division of the BAA, the "Shodokan Division".)

There's also a separate division for people who're practicing "Aikikai" aikido - the "Traditional Division" - it has something to do with the historical links between the BAA and the Kai Shin Kai - but I digress.

For some reason, all the "Tomiki style" brits posting on Aikiweb lately (Martin, Sam, Yann, myself) are members of the relatively 'purist' Shodokan Division, so if you were to judge just by reading Aikiweb you'd probably think there are more of us than there actually are.
One of the man who wore hakama looks like David Fielding. I heard that he was the national team coach of UK.
You're quite right, David Fielding was there, and he did wear a hakama for some events. There are two coaches for the main BAA national team, David Fielding is one, and his partner, Vanda Fairchild, is the other. I'm glad you enjoyed his visit to Korea.

Sean

x

batemanb
09-19-2003, 02:03 AM
The referee in the background was indeed Bob Jones, and given that his son was one of the competitors theres no way he should have been refereeing at that moment in time. I'm not suggesting he was anything other than scrupulously impartial (especially not on a public forum), but seriously - would you find someone sitting on the judging panel at, say, an international ice-skating competition awarding points to their son or daughter? Not a chance.
Hi Sean,

I've only met Bob and Simon the once, when Bob took a weekend coaching course that I was on, and Simon also attended. When I fist viewed the pictures, I only recognized Simon in the later ones, I didn't realize that he was the "flying" uke until I just looked closer. Both Bob and Simon were incredibly nice chaps, whilst the thought that there may be anything improper going on never actually occurred to me (I'm responding to your post now, not making any accusations or suppositions), I guess that there is always that risk. I would have to agree that it might have been more wise, or even appropriate to have had an independant judge if that was part of the competition.

Regards

Bryan

PeterR
09-19-2003, 02:40 AM
More appropriate is the correct word but to be fair there really is a limited pool of judges.

If not the father than someone else who probably knows one of two pairs much better than the other.

I know there was some grumbling about the judges but if I recall it wasn't the experienced ones but a number that were shanghied to build up the numbers. It was after all a large event.

In Japan there is a concerted effort to build up a cadre of trained judges basically after a similar incident many years ago where the judging seems to have been coloured by old boy affiliations.

Sean - please don't compare us to figure skating. Talk about corrupt.