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Phillip Armel
07-22-2003, 07:14 PM
What type of music do you listen to before, during, and after aikido practice? I always listen to music which is rock or something along those lines. In practice my sensi plays some japanese instrumental music(? I think ?). When I get home normally I listen to some rock music or put on some Opeth or Symphony X. What does everyone elese listen to?

Veers
07-22-2003, 09:38 PM
None during, unless our neighboring Tai Ji class has classical playing...

As for after...often none...sometimes Final Fantasy music...sometimes anime soundtracks...sometimes something else...and sometimes nothing.

NagaBaba
07-22-2003, 09:50 PM
What does everyone elese listen to?
hip hop

Sita Nanthavong
07-23-2003, 12:11 AM
the sounds of "oooff" and "aarrrggghhhh" and the occassional "whap whap" of someone tapping.

does that count?

Tim Griffiths
07-23-2003, 03:03 AM
Before: Whatever my wife left playing in the car.

During: Whatever's playing in the aerobics class next door.

After: Whatever's playing in the pub.

Tim

mj
07-23-2003, 06:43 AM
'My Heart Will Go On' by Celine Dion.

Really brings out the urge to kill someone.

happysod
07-23-2003, 06:49 AM
Mark, thanks, I've always avoided aikido & music - but this brings in a whole new perspective:D

Michael Willers
07-23-2003, 06:56 AM
Many years ago I studied aikido in college. We practiced in the mat room, right next door to a women's self defense class, separated from us by a very thin, sound-permeable "wall."

The self defense class played Tori Amos' "Crucify Myself" over and over again. It was punctuated with the sounds of "Eyes! Knees! Groin! Move back!"

As we tried to find some silence and peace during our aikido practice, it used to drive us bonkers.

So I guess I could say that I listen to "Crucify Myself" during aikido practice, however unwillingly.

bob_stra
07-23-2003, 07:17 AM
'My Heart Will Go On' by Celine Dion.

Really brings out the urge to kill someone.
Feeling it. ;-)

justinm
07-23-2003, 07:48 AM
Before - sometimes Officium (Jan Garbarek plays saxaphone with an English vocal quartet singing early choral music). An amazing blend that makes the spirit soar.

Warning - it may make you cry.

During - nothing, but thought about trying it

After - nothing as too busy thinking about what worked and what didn't work during the class.

Justin

C. Emerson
07-23-2003, 10:45 AM
I'm a traditionalist at heart I guess, I train with any music. I've got lots of friends who do. I've just never got into it. I think that for me that the training hall is a sanctuary for me. Not that you could not have music in a sanctuary, but I try to escape from life and focus on myself when I'm there. Maybe I'll try some mood music to help me relax and focus on my techniques.

-Chad

akiy
07-23-2003, 11:04 AM
We actually had two classes here where we had one of our members with experience in African drumming play his drums during the class. Some people liked it while others didn't.

Robert Nadeau sensei often teaches randori to drumming at what used to be the San Rafael Summer Retreat (now in Menlo Park).

I think I prefer the "usual" sounds of training over music myself. I wonder if listening to music while training will make the music manipulate one's internal "rhythm" that develops within the technique itself? One thing I've been looking for these days is to connect with and then "break" my partner's internal rhythm; I would think it would be difficult to do this if we were both operating in basically the same rhythm (ie to external music)...

-- Jun

Jim ashby
07-23-2003, 11:27 AM
Before training I think Chumbawumba's tubthumping is very appropriate. "I get knocked down, but I get up again, y'aint never gonna keep me down".

Says it all really.

Have fun.

Ramos
07-23-2003, 12:21 PM
Hello! I don't it take as an obligation to listen to music after or before practice and we certainly don't listen to music while practicing at the dojo. I'm constantly listening to psy-trance (Astral Projection, Infected Mushroom, SynSUN, Blue Planet Corp., etc), symphonic metal (The Gathering, Nightwish, Within Temptation) and Ambient music (Numina). Actually i would like to recommend the last one to the yoga/meditation practicioners; very smooth, dreamy music, good carrying wave for the mind, helps you reach those higher states of mind. If you're interested, here's one of my favourite songs:

http://uk.play.mp3.com/cgi-bin/play/play.cgi/AAIBQp70CgDABG5vcm1QBAAAAFLwiAEAUQEAAABDTcEaP3mxt9u5RR62kDu5JrKGKuU-/A_Distant_Gaze_then_Si.m3u

More info and tracks on:

http://uk.artists.mp3s.com/artists/100/numina.html

Cheers.

C. Emerson
07-23-2003, 12:25 PM
Jun, very good point.

Dennis Hooker
07-23-2003, 02:10 PM
I play and listen to Old Time Music (Appalachian mountain music, not Bluegrass) almost every chance I get. Sometimes I can't play before class but I always play after. An unscientific observation I have made over the years is that I find more creative and artistic individuals per capita in the Aikido community than in other communities I associate with. It seems Aikido people in general have a talent for expressing themselves and chose various creative mediums through which to do it.

DaveO
07-23-2003, 04:49 PM
During regular class; nothing. During personal practice at home; Sarah Brightman.

Her rendition of "Nessun Dorma" is IMO one of the finest pieces of recorded music; great to breathe to - very relaxing.

Qatana
07-23-2003, 05:04 PM
I don't listen to music at home. In the dojo we are subjected to ballet music from one side and tap dancing to Irish music on the other.

I would like very much to train to drums & hope to muster up the courage to get myself to CityAikido sometime before i die and take class with Nadeau Sensei...

jk
07-23-2003, 08:12 PM
We actually had two classes here where we had one of our members with experience in African drumming play his drums during the class. Some people liked it while others didn't.
Heck, bring in a band...have four musicians like in a Muay Thai bout. What's interesting is that the music can slow down or quicken depending on what's happening on the mat or just because they (the musicians) want to mess with your head.
I wonder if listening to music while training will make the music manipulate one's internal "rhythm" that develops within the technique itself? One thing I've been looking for these days is to connect with and then "break" my partner's internal rhythm; I would think it would be difficult to do this if we were both operating in basically the same rhythm (ie to external music)
That's a good question. All the more reason to find out.

taras
07-24-2003, 03:25 AM
I don't listen to anything before or during practice. If I remember correctly, OSensei said "don't be drawn into the rythm of your enemy". I think this has something to do with what Jun said. If it's a bad ideai to be drawn into rythm of your opponent, then I guess it's no good being drawn into any other external rythm.

After practice, during beer waza I listen to Deep Purple, System of the Down etc. After a couple of pints or if I don't bring anyone from dojo home (very rarely) I'll put on King Crimson or Miles Davies.

taras
07-24-2003, 03:31 AM
Once I was training in this place that had some kind of cafe kiosk or something. I couldn't tell, it had shutters over it. But inside there must have been some sort of coffee machine or something and it kept playing tunes like 'Cucaracha', it sounded like Jamaican drums. Someone asked sensei, what on earth is that? Her just said, it's the music of Aikido. I almost went into a roll laughing, it sounded so cheesy.

So, know ye when you hear 'Cucaracha' next time! :D

Kalle Koskinen
07-24-2003, 04:14 PM
Before training, I listen to music that is quite fast, aggressive and chaotic. The point is to get me very energetic and relaxed at the same time. As it may sound a bit funny, but I do really get in a good mood from music that most of people would hate.

For those who are curious, try to find bands like Revenge, Abominator, Bestial Warlust and Angel Corpse.

While the music I listen to is raw and brutal, it doesn't mess my Aikido. I'm very gentle and try to find the softness. It's usually just that I take a short nap before training and I need to wake up real fast. So what's better way than really ugly music...

Phillip Armel
07-25-2003, 12:17 AM
I think music makes a huge difference when it comes to setting the ambience. Just gets people into a common rythm I think. I find for me personally it can help raise my energy level, which is a good thing lol. Maybe you should see if your sensi wants to put on music during class, maybe some light instrumentals or something. Something not really distracting, but you know it's there(that made no sense did it? lol). Experiment a little, I don't think it'd hurt anyone :)

zachbiesanz
07-25-2003, 01:49 AM
Our practice room is close enough to the weights area that we can always hear Today's Hottest Rock or whatever. The amazing thing is that I never notice it during practice, but as soon as we're done, it hits me really hard and I wonder how I could have possibly ignored it.

I just chalk that up to mushin.

AikiTsuru
07-26-2003, 03:26 PM
Well, you can can me old fashion but to be honest I was always thought that during class there should be no distraction, no interuption, no speaking, and no goofing off. One's attention, eyes and ears should be always directed and focused on your Instructor (Sensei).

However before class i always like to get the adrenaline flowing by listening to anything that fits my mood.

But after class i dont listen to anything because i like to think and reflect on what i have learned.

:ai: :ki: :do:

shihonage
07-27-2003, 03:42 AM
During regular class; nothing. During personal practice at home; Sarah Brightman.

Her rendition of "Nessun Dorma" is IMO one of the finest pieces of recorded music; great to breathe to - very relaxing.
Not to mention "Hija de la luna".

Nacho_mx
07-27-2003, 04:22 PM
Before class, whatever is on the Pop music station (80's and 90īs). No distractions during class as talking (and shouting and laughing and groaning and crying...) is forbidden, luckily the dojo is in a quiet neighborhood and there are no outside distractions, we donīt share space with other activities. After class whatever is on the CD magazine, movie soundtracks, classical, Pop, Rock, New Age, etc. Iīm very eclectic, I hear what I like, and I donīt hear what I donīt like.