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Charles Hill
06-22-2003, 09:53 PM
I'd like to ask what teachers you have found really interesting, and why?

Not teachers that you think are really good or teach well (although they could be that too) but teachers that you have found intriguing and different from the norm.

Charles

Conrad Gus
06-22-2003, 11:33 PM
Koichi Barrish Sensei at the Tsubaki Grand Shrine ([URL=http://www.tsubakishrine.org]) is totally fascinating to me. He is the only teacher I have met that integrates Shinto teachingg fully with Aikido. He also does ki waza without worrying about getting labelled by the Aikido community. Way outside the mainstream, but I think he has a great deal to teach.

justinm
06-23-2003, 04:45 AM
I found Robert Nadeau Shihan fascinating when I visited his dojo last week. Probably because he teaches in a totally different way to my usual teachers.

I thought him very inspirational.

batemanb
06-23-2003, 07:19 AM
Endo Sensei, I like the way he plays around, and I like the way that he spends most of his time teaching, actually practicing, giving any one who wants it the chance to uke.

DavidEllard
06-23-2003, 07:38 AM
I'd second what Bryan* said there. Endo Shihan is amazing in the way he "plays" with people.

Other than that Sensei Jorma Lyle from Sweden constently amazes me with what he can make happen, doing almost unreal things, like making you fall over before getting within a couple of feet of him. Very different to the "norm".

*BTW - Hi Bryan - we appear to live in the same town, sunny Milton Keynes! Hope to see you on the mat sometime - we can swop impressions of Endo Sense!

batemanb
06-23-2003, 08:41 AM
I'd second what Bryan* said there. Endo Shihan is amazing in the way he "plays" with people.

Other than that Sensei Jorma Lyle from Sweden constently amazes me with what he can make happen, doing almost unreal things, like making you fall over before getting within a couple of feet of him. Very different to the "norm".

*BTW - Hi Bryan - we appear to live in the same town, sunny Milton Keynes! Hope to see you on the mat sometime - we can swop impressions of Endo Sense!
Hi David,

Yes we do! You're more than welcome to come along to the Seishin dojo at Eaglestone sometime (Monday & Wednesday evenings).

DavidEllard
06-23-2003, 08:54 AM
I've been there a couple of times, and enjoyed myself, met Sensei Ray Munn(?) once. But it's a fourth night a week training and I can rarely make it.

The offer is open the other way, your welcome to join us in Dunstable or Dinton, outside Aylesbury. Both of the Sensei's (Antony Pinchbeck and Jeremy Osbourne) travel overseas a couple of times a year to train with Endo Sensei, and many more times to train with his students. (We were in Norway last week with three teachers from Norway, Sweden and Germany!)

So if you enjoy the style of Aikido Endo Sensei teaches please come and see us.

(Email me if you want further details or directions)

batemanb
06-23-2003, 09:12 AM
David,

I took Ray up to Birmingham when Endo Sensei was over in February. I met Tony there briefly, he and Ray are old chums. You must know Mark too then, he knows me quite well from the old days.

Greg Jennings
06-23-2003, 09:57 AM
Of those that I've personally trained with, Hans Goto of Bay Marin Aikido and Donald Moriyama of Pearl City Aikido Dojo fit the bill as the most intriguing, if in very different ways.

Regards,

tedehara
06-23-2003, 11:19 AM
I'd have to include my own instructor, Jon Eley Sensei. Even though he is a 6th dan and has been doing Aikido since it started in Chicago (40+ years), most people in Chicago and the Ki Society don't know of him. However, when he teaches, I always see and learn something new. This has been going on for 14+ years.

Another interesting teacher is Mikoto Masahilo Nakazono (1918 - 1994). Sensei Nakazono studied Aikido directly under O Sensei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, for many years in Japan. He left behind his thoughts on Kototama. Although he is not as well known as Stevens, Gleason or Barrish, he is one of the few direct links to understanding O Sensei's spirituality.

One of his former students is selling reprints of his essays at

http://www.kototamabooks.com/

BC
06-23-2003, 12:13 PM
Two particular instructors that I find intriguing:

- Funakoshi Sensei from Yamagata-ken in Yamagata City, Japan. Studied under Rinjiro Shirata Sensei, and his style reflects it.

-Hayato Osawa Sensei from Aikikai Hombu dojo.

Charles Hill
06-23-2003, 12:42 PM
The names aren't enough! Please tell why you find these people intriguing. I trained with Endo Shihan for over four years at the Aikikai Honbu, but I don't know much about the other teachers other than their names. I'm sure there are many people who might read these posts and not know any of the names.

Charles

Kyri Honigh
06-23-2003, 02:27 PM
My own Sensei, cause he gives you proper guidance and yet gives you some freedom to try things out, approving anything different if it coincides with the basics.And he's a real nice guy! (Frank Wong Loi Sing Sensei)

And Yamada Shihan, he has the most solid Basics is aikido.He is powerful and really respected by many, but always has time for everyone.At seminars for example you can just walk up to him and say hello and talk about aikido or whatever.

Aikiscott
06-23-2003, 06:50 PM
I recently trained with Kubota Sensei & was realy impressed with his Techniques. His excelent body movement was awesome & I really did like his Use of Kicks & other forms of Atemi in his techniques.

The other Sensei that I found Intriguing was Tanaka sensei. He is the first sensei I had trained under who taught me that you can be soft/Gentle and still convincing/Martial in your technique.

so I guess that is the Ying and Yang of my experiances.

Scott Sweetland
06-23-2003, 09:46 PM
I found Gaku Homma sensei a very interesting man. :)

Firstly, his dojo in Denver is an almost magical place to me. A little slice of Japan in a real bad neighborhood. I remember staying there during seminars and I would get up in the middle of the night and go down and sit on the mat and stare at the kamiza. The place had this feel to it that I can only describe as "spiritual air conditioning" hehe. I remember Homma sensei inviting us into the kitchen area to sit and drink sake with him and I remember when he told us the story of how Steven Segal got his Godan rank lol. He always compared Aikido to fried rice; everyone makes theirs with a little different ingredients. :)

A.w.H
06-24-2003, 06:03 PM
Personly, I like any teacher that has a sence humor. As long as they stay on the topic and don't get to caried away with their humor.

When somone makes the situation more enjoyable i find it is easier to understand the point they are trying to get across. Throw in somthing funny once in a while and see how it turns out :)

adrian
06-25-2003, 02:06 AM
I found Gaku Homma sensei a very interesting man. :)

...with him and I remember when he told us the story of how Steven Segal got his Godan rank lol. He always compared Aikido to fried rice; everyone makes theirs with a little different ingredients. :)
I really really want to hear that story ;)

pleeeasee.

DGLinden
06-25-2003, 03:56 PM
Steve McPeck Sensei in Sarasota Florida

He is subtle, strong and amazingly centered though he can't weigh any more than my left leg. He does a kind of Aikido that is really for people of small stature, and it is amazingly effective with large people - as uke. Large people have a hard time with his technique... see, he likes to disappear!

Very interesting stuff. He is also quiet, self effacing and a remarkable artist. A great teacher who is overlooked.

Jesse Lee
06-26-2003, 01:16 PM
Isn't *somebody* going to bust out some Chiba stories in this thread? We all know he is one intriguing fellow....

Eric Joyce
06-26-2003, 01:55 PM
I would say one of the most interesting teachers I have met would be the late Akira Tohei, Midwest Regional Head of the USAF in Chicago. He was one of O'Sensei's students. Very short, but had very effective techniques. He had an intensity about him I had never seen before. He would look at you and it felt like you were shrinking sometimes. As time went on, I got to know more about him and he was an excellent teacher. He is truly missed.

paw
06-26-2003, 02:20 PM
Tetsutaka Sugawara Sensei.... for his unique blend of aikido, chinese martial arts and Katori Shinto Ryu.

Not to mention his books.....

Aikiscott
06-26-2003, 05:02 PM
Isn't *somebody* going to bust out some Chiba stories in this thread? We all know he is one intriguing fellow....
I get chiba stories all the time as my Sensei trained under Chiba in England. Have seen lots of footage of Chiba Breaking peoples Jaws with Kokyu & dislocating Shoulders & snapping the tops off Jo sticks.

Yes he is a quite the intriguing man.

Don_Modesto
06-26-2003, 05:33 PM
Steve McPeck Sensei in Sarasota Florida
Good call, Dan. I thoroughly agree. What a blast it is to train with him.

I'd add George Ledyard. His classes move along building on what went before (unlike some which just pile one technique on another). I've found myself "getting into zones" in his classes more quickly and deeply than anyone I've trained with for years.

Based on his Expo demo, I'd like to train with Rick Stickles sometime. I thought that was a really interesting demo.

I'd like to take the trip up to Wash. for Toby Threadgill's seminar, too. He looks very good.

aikidodragongio
07-02-2003, 01:36 PM
Alright, if you guys are in the mood for an interesting sensei you have to include Sensei Tracy Legodais. He's not a large man being slightly under 5'5" average build for his height and has part of 1 functioning lung (Gulf war vet). Despite this little set back he was able to knock me on my butt when I first met him and has such power within him that you'd never know it. Along with his extremely jovial disposition I must say that he's an exceptional individual and teacher. If you're ever in Rotterdam look him up, it's an experience you'll never forget. P.S. - he's currently NiDan and is working on SanDan and is also ranked in DaitoRyu ;)

George S. Ledyard
07-04-2003, 07:56 PM
The man who immediately comes to mind in this respect is Tom Read sensei in Arcada, CA. I have been training for almost thirty years and he does techniques in w ay I have never seen any else do it. He has a way of talking about what he is doing that is unique, very mathematical.

Unlike some "radical" types who can do all sorts of cool looking stuff as long as they are using their own ukes, Tom likes nothing better than to have some 4th or 5th Dan from any Aikido tradition whatever drop in and train. I have seen him toy with some very excellent folks who had every intention of bopping him him if they could.

His bojutsu work is extraordinary but you have to hear his explanation to realize what he is doing.

sanosuke
07-04-2003, 08:20 PM
Teachers that really intriguing me is my instructors both in Malaysia and Indonesia. They already give me a new perception about martial arts and had helped me a lot in finding my expectation towards learning aikido. Through this forum I expressed my deepest gratitude to all their teachings.

I also like Joe Thambu sensei and Tomita sensei teachings very much, I really learned a lot from them.

I also want to know about Seiseki Abe sensei, anyone can give me some info?

Don_Modesto
07-05-2003, 01:05 PM
The man who immediately comes to mind in this respect is Tom Read sensei in Arcada, CA....His bojutsu work is extraordinary but you have to hear his explanation to realize what he is doing.
Failing his own words appearing here, would you feel comfortable relating some of his thoughts for us, George?

After hearing you say this in person, I've gone back and watched his demo from the Expo more than once and and what he's doing still completely escapes me.

Thanks.

Robert Cowham
07-05-2003, 03:53 PM
For a very different take on budo, try Inaba sensei at the Shiseikan - part of the Meji Jingu shrine in Tokyo. Used to be very difficult to train there but it's very open these days.

He studied with Yamaguchi sensei among others, and also Kashima Shinryu (a koryu) with Kunii Sensei before he died in the 60s.

We have a couple of Inaba sensei's senior students coming to London in August.

Robert

George S. Ledyard
07-05-2003, 09:33 PM
Failing his own words appearing here, would you feel comfortable relating some of his thoughts for us, George?

After hearing you say this in person, I've gone back and watched his demo from the Expo more than once and what he's doing still completely escapes me.

Thanks.
I couldn't possibly do it justice. You've got to hear Tom Read Sensei explain it. At first you think, "This guy is really off in space", then you try to do what he is doing and you can't get anywhere near. So you start to listen again and you realize that he is so far out in front of you that he is answering questions which you hadn't even thought to ask. This isn't about fighting; it's about the energetics with the staff. The Expo was unfortunate because people couldn’t tell what he was doing and he made no effort to give explanation. You really have to talk to him…

One of my own students went down and did his aikibojitsu seminar in the mountains and it changed his Aikido completely. I could feel the difference right away when he came back.

I also saw one of my other friends who had done the training do some absolutely scintillating bo work on his San Dan test. Sparks practically flew off his weapon.

So I figure the training is really worth doing, I just haven’t had time myself yet.

Check out his website for a bit of explanation of what he is doing...

Aikibojitsu (http://www.aikibojitsu.com/)

Sometime we'll have him again for a seminar and maybe you can come out.

Mark Balogh
07-08-2003, 09:43 AM
Tamura Sensei, if you've been on his mat you'll know what I mean. He is living Aikido and can do techniques to anyone, but I have rarely seen anyone successfully execute a technique on him. He is just a different level! :)

Sharon Seymour
07-08-2003, 08:39 PM
Okay. No one has mentioned Mary Heiny Sensei yet. I had a major epiphany taking ukemi for her once. It was a "simple" kokyunage and as she dropped for the throw I felt that she could easily put me right into the center of the earth. The throw itself was light and irresistible. I really enjoy working with someone my size who is so powerful.

Another time I received a kokyunage projection throw that had one of those timeless transitions - I grabbed her here, then I was on the mat way over there.

She asks for volunteers to take ukemi for her at seminars, so might work with any skill level (over the course of the seminar, more and more people are willing to volunteer).

Another teacher once compared attacking Heiny Sensei to grabbing a little hand grenade!

MikeE
07-08-2003, 10:59 PM
I'm sure there are a lot of people lurking that would agree with me that Bill Sosa Sensei was amazing.

He had Ki that was tangible. His technique was soft, subtle, and powerful. His aikido transcended style. It was big when it needed to be big, it was small when it needed to be small. It was amazing.

And he was absolutely scary with a jo :)

Man, I miss him.

Paul Klembeck
07-08-2003, 11:40 PM
I will vote for both Tom Read and Mary Heini.

Tom Read has a highly unique approach to energetics which is solidly based on mathematics, physics and engineering. Applying Fourier Analysis to Jo strikes is not something you encounter elsewhere, but the analysis is quite sound.

Mary Heini's approach to energetics is more of what we normally see, but she has an ability I have not seen in anyone else to actually get individuals to do amazing things, rather than just showing what she can do and handwaving about how.

Interestingly, my two quite different choices both spend their most formative years in Shingu at the same time.

Paul

P.S. Speaking of Shingu, Clint George is also very interesting, both for purity of technique and his highly martial approach.

JMCavazos
07-09-2003, 11:22 AM
I agree with Mike and go with Bill Sosa Sensei. His aikido skills were simply amazing!

But what made him a special teacher, to me, was his ability to build a person into someone who was a better man or woman because of the interaction with Sosa Sensei. When I first met him, I had one of those feelings of awe that I never got over. He has to be one of the greatest men there ever was -- and his aikido was great. He had to be one of the best kept secrets in the aikido world.

I truly believe that it is rare for a student to be better than his teacher (I am talking about high ranking teachers). But I would venture to say that Bill Sosa Sensei had to evolve past his previous teachers (my opinion)

I have currently chosen to follow Lynn Fabia Sensei since Bill Sosa Sensei's death last year. One of the major reasons was that Sosa Sensei himself said that she was the closest to his aikido that there was. Under her training I have felt the same teachings that Sosa Sensei taught. She is even more truely amazing because she is about 5' tall and weighs about 97 lbs, but she has excellent control of large fellows like myself 6'5" & 260 lbs.

Most intriguing would have to be Bill Sosa Sensei and Lynn Fabia Sensei.