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Jenna Sanderson
04-15-2003, 08:18 PM
Hello all. :)

I took one semester of aikido in college (required phys. ed class for credit). I enjoyed it immensely but couldn't continue with the college club after that due to a conflicting class schedule.

I am a recent graduate and want to get back into aikido, this time on a more serious and long-term basis. When I trained in college, the dojo rule was that ALL jewelry, earrings and wedding bands included, had to be removed. I had no problem with this, and understand why it would be bad to have protruding or sharp edges on jewelry.

I am engaged and will be married this summer. Obviously, I wouldn't wear my diamond to train (OUCH that could hurt!), but once my wedding band goes on, it's not coming off. Neither my fiance or I think it's appropriate to remove them for any reason. Incidentally, my ring is a 4 mm comfort fit platinum band...nothing sticking out or pointy.

I'd ask the sensei of the local dojo, but I am relocating to an as-yet unknown location right after the wedding...so I don't know what my local dojo would be! Does anyone on here wear their wedding band to train? I would hate for this to be a hindrance, but I simply can't see myself doing aikido again if it means my ring has to come off.

Dave Porter
04-15-2003, 09:15 PM
Hi, I think it really depends on the rules of the Dojo. I wear mine, but I've been asked to remove it before. Just a thought from someone who's been married for 11 years, you have a noble senitment, but I think your going to find it's not always feasible. Allow me to offer two stories about wedding bands and personal safety.

My father is a mechanic. He accidentally touched his wedding ring against a Positive terminal on a battery and burned a hole in his finger (He should have removed it)...VERY MUCH OUCH!!!

Second, My brother was handicapped and confined to a wheelchair. I was closing the chair once and it collapsed on my hand, smashing my ring into my finger (Unforseeable accident.) Another case of VERY MUCH OUCH.

Anyhow, I hope you can see my point on this. Sometimes things happen irregardless of our intentions, however good or noble. But, I would offer this, If you are unwilling to remove your ring (For your own safety) for an hour to train, then maybe Martial arts arent really for you. I've studied Karate, Taekwondo, Ju Jitsu, and Kempo, and am now an Aikidoka, it is understood in any art, the rules are really for your safety. Hope you find what you're looking for. :)

~Dave~

Dave Porter
04-15-2003, 09:17 PM
let me amend that, Martial arts are for everyone. But if something this small is going to keep you off the mat, IMO you don't want to train that badly. Just my opinion. :(

~Dave~

PeterR
04-15-2003, 09:36 PM
Come on Dave - she's just about to get married. Allow a little romance and sweet mushy stuff. It usually comes down a few notches eventually.

I actually don't think a wedding band is that much a danger to your training partners and for Aikido beginners it really does not need to be an issue. Eventually, if that's where you want to go, it is possible to break or dislocate a finger in training. I would rather have taken the ring off before hand and not have it cut off.

Been happily married 12 years and I don't wear a wedding ring. Too dangerous for my work, my play and of no significance to how I feel about my wife (I too can be mushy).
let me amend that, Martial arts are for everyone. But if something this small is going to keep you off the mat, IMO you don't want to train that badly. Just my opinion.

Kevin Wilbanks
04-15-2003, 09:50 PM
It sounds like your idiosyncratic beliefs about the symbolism of the ring are extreme enough to put this in a category of seeking special treatment or exemption for a religious belief. I tend to come down on the side of not going too far to accomodate this kind of zealotry, personally, regardless of how laudable or holy the purported reason/pretext. Basically, if the rules are good enough for everyone else, why are they not good enough for you? What makes you better than others and entitled to an exemption? It seems hard for me not to see this kind of thing as an attempt to generate ego-aggrandizing drama, to set oneself apart from the crowd... a manufactured 'high-noon' showdown between the importance of your marriage and the importance of Aikido... If that kind of thing floats your boat, enjoy it, but don't be surprised if it goes over like a lead balloon with any given sensei and group of Aikidoka.

On the other hand, if it really isn't about all that, just put a strip of white athletic tape over it. This is what people do who have long nails for guitar playing that can't be trimmed, or unremovable piercings.

jxa127
04-15-2003, 11:30 PM
Hello all. :)

I am engaged and will be married this summer. Obviously, I wouldn't wear my diamond to train (OUCH that could hurt!), but once my wedding band goes on, it's not coming off. Neither my fiance or I think it's appropriate to remove them for any reason. Incidentally, my ring is a 4 mm comfort fit platinum band...nothing sticking out or pointy.
Congratulations! My wife and I just celebrated our 1st anniversary this past Sunday.

My sensei has no trouble with me keeping the ring on to train (6mm gold comfort band), but I do, literally, have trouble keeping it on when I train. It gets somewhat cold in our dojo, my finger shrinks, and the ring gets very loose. So I keep it in my gym bag, in its box when I train.

It's wonderful being married, and I LOVE wearing my ring. I just don't want anything bad to happen to it when I'm training.

Regards,

-Drew

akiy
04-15-2003, 11:47 PM
I doubt anyone would ask you to take off any kind of ring or jewelry outside of safety reasons. Like Peter above, I've heard of at least one story where a person had to have their ring cut off from the finger due to it getting whacked too hard. Whether it's a martial urband legend or not, I'd personally think twice before wearing a ring or any kind of jewelry on the mat.

-- Jun

PeterR
04-15-2003, 11:54 PM
It wasn't Aikido but I was present when one lady slammed the car door on her two smaller fingers. When it happened she cursed and went looking for some ice - about fifteen minutes later she started screaming and yes it had to be cut off. I had forgotten about weapons work - I can easily see the same effect.
I've heard of at least one story where a person had to have their ring cut off from the finger due to it getting whacked too hard.

Tadhg Bird
04-16-2003, 12:38 AM
Our dojo rule is "no protruding jewlery" as for my ring (silver, with celtic knotwork (was dirt poor when I wed)) it never ever comes off. Well, becuase I've gained some weight, and my finger is just to damn fat for it to come off now. If its ever to be removed, it will have to be cut. Luckily, if that day does come, my wifes old ring, that matches this one exactly is available, since she now wears a gold band. Actually we traded our rings back and forth often depending on which ring fit which person at the time. They are both the same size, but one is stretched a bit bigger than the other. I should have put the bigger ring on years ago. ;)

Kelly Allen
04-16-2003, 01:24 AM
I got to say comfort fit ring or not I saw a bad one when I was a kid training in Judo. The Jewlery rule applied there as well and one of the students didn't remember to take his band off. He was thrown. The guy who threw him lost his balance and went down on one knee right on his ring. This not only caused the ring wearer to dislocate his ring finger the ring had to be cut off. The guy who landed on his finger cracked his knee cap. Ouch! Class ended ealy that night. And no one wore jewlery again.

Is it a safty issue? You bet! Not just for you but the ppl you train with as well.

If you can find a dojo that don't care about jewlery the more power to you. But I personally won't train with anyone who wears jewlery. This topic has made me flash back to the sounds of the screams of pain both of them did when this happened. (Shudder)

erikmenzel
04-16-2003, 03:53 AM
I always ask people to take off any rings in our dojo.

I have been in the unfortunate circumstances to have seen somebody break his finger (with ring) by just slapping the mat while softly rolling, and having to rush this person to the hospital to have his ring cut off in order to safe the finger. It is something I never want to experience again. To all the skeptics that claim that wearing a ring is not that dangerous: I have seen that it can go horribly wrong!! Dont take that risk!! Be safe!!

PeterR
04-16-2003, 05:04 AM
Gross wedding ring stories. The grand-dad of a friend was missing his ring finger on his useless arm. Apparently during WWII he jumped off the back of a 2-ton truck - you know the kind, with steel arches that you could cover with canvas. His wedding ring caught as he jumped and not only took the finger but apparently a whole lot of other inside stuff with it almost to the armpit. I'm still trying to figure the anatomy of it out but that stuff included some major nerves hence the now useless and shriveled arm.

paw
04-16-2003, 05:53 AM
Congrats!

I wear my wedding ring during practice, never had any problems. I've been asked to take it off, and that's no big deal either.

For what it's worth, I've seen far more injuries result from wearing hakama than wearing wedding rings. Kevin's advice of using athletic tape sounds fine to me if you don't want to take the ring off.

Regards and best wishes,

Paul

joan
04-16-2003, 07:19 AM
I agree with Paul about injuries being more common with hakama.

We have no hard and fast rules, more like common sense prevails. I've worn my band for 23 years now and the only time in training when I've thought twice was during weapons work. But no one else including the sensei has ever said anything. People wear their rings (or not) according to preference.

BTW when I've worked in the ER we have ways of removing rings besides cutting them off--this has come in handy with other finger injuries.

rachmass
04-16-2003, 07:21 AM
Congratulations on your engagement, and your returning to training.

I sometimes wear my wedding ring, but usually remove it because it is safer altogether. Sometimes my fingers swell and it is too difficult to get off, in which case I leave it on (it's just a small, typical band) and its never been a problem. I also am the sensei of my small dojo, and have no problem with someone keeping their wedding ring on if they really want to. See lots of folks out there training with bands on (no protruding stones, or stones period).

Kelly Allen
04-16-2003, 07:36 AM
Congrats!

I wear my wedding ring during practice, never had any problems. I've been asked to take it off, and that's no big deal either.

For what it's worth, I've seen far more injuries result from wearing hakama than wearing wedding rings. Kevin's advice of using athletic tape sounds fine to me if you don't want to take the ring off.

Regards and best wishes,

Paul
Tape won't do much for you if someone lands on it like I mentioned above.

Avery Jenkins
04-16-2003, 07:43 AM
I always take my wedding ring off when I'm doing aikido or manual labor. So far, it hasn't had any detrimental effects on my marriage (14 years and still going strong, with the usual occaisional inclination to whack the other party upside the head with a frying pan). I think you'll find that the strength of your relationship lies far less in the symbology of the ring than it does in the way you say good morning.

Avery

Jeff Tibbetts
04-16-2003, 08:45 AM
You know, I can't help but imagine a situation where a botched yonkyo or something causes the ring to slip off... No-one lands on it, no fingers are broken, but maybe the ring-wearer starts hyperventilating (because they must not love their spouse, how will they tell them?) and needs to go to the emergency room.

I'm kidding, of course. I don't mean any disrespect, but I'm married as well and a ring is really just a ring. I treat my ring with the same reverance as my weapons - which is a lot, but my weapons go back in their bag with a bow just as my ring goes back on my finger. They are symbols, and all their meaning is applied to them by you and your loved one. It's only bad to remove them if you make it that way in your mind, and is that a healthy thing to do? I think that the above-mentioned piece of short fiction is farciful, but I wonder, would you resent someone for inadvertantly removing your ring? Far be it for me to try to judge you, but I think that part of what we do every day involves sacrifices. Sometimes those sacrifices are real: our blood, our energy, our ego; and sometimes we make them into more important than they really are: our time, our sweat, our ego...

SeiserL
04-16-2003, 09:03 AM
I never take my ring off. Never bothers or injured my training partners, actually an assistance for them in applying Sankyo when they grab the fingers.

Congratulations!

Paul Smith
04-16-2003, 09:27 AM
Due to injury, no longer training. However, from 1997 on, wore it continuously (and training intensely). No problem, and I do not know of anyone who would have a problem with wearing a simple band.

Kevin Wilbanks - Glad you've got such a god like handle on human behavior. Let me know (if you deign to speak in a language we mere mortals can grasp) where your shrine is and I'll be sure to come (with shaking knees).

Paul Smith
04-16-2003, 10:29 AM
A bit of a followup, re: Kevin's post. Under the guise of being an iconoclast regarding religious/idiosyncratic "zealotry," Kevin, you proceed to say "if the rules are good enough for every one else, why not you." Can't have it both ways. Calling people fools or zealots for having individual beliefs does not square with telling them to tow the party line.

People have beliefs; each to their own. I am an atheist, but would never become religious in my atheism by declaring "religious believers" are "idiosyncratic" fools, and need to convert to my way of thinking.

Bryan Webb
04-16-2003, 10:30 AM
We make removing a band an option. Since we work out on mats over a hardwood gym floor , we have had the mats slide and someone slaps the floor,bending the ring. The only way to get the ring off is to rebend it or cut it off...before the blood to the finger is cut off, if thats too late then there goes the finger.

Bryan Webb

Michael Neal
04-16-2003, 10:42 AM
It sounds like your idiosyncratic beliefs about the symbolism of the ring are extreme enough to put this in a category of seeking special treatment or exemption for a religious belief. I tend to come down on the side of not going too far to accomodate this kind of zealotry, personally, regardless of how laudable or holy the purported reason/pretext.
Jeez, relax dude.

KaitlinCostello
04-16-2003, 10:52 AM
I am engaged and will be married this summer. Obviously, I wouldn't wear my diamond to train (OUCH that could hurt!), but once my wedding band goes on, it's not coming off. Neither my fiance or I think it's appropriate to remove them for any reason. Incidentally, my ring is a 4 mm comfort fit platinum band...nothing sticking out or pointy.
I too am engaged . My ring is a puzzle ring which a solitaire that protrudes from the actual band. I wouldn’t think of training with it on, nor will I ever train with my wedding band, as the engagement piece interlaces with the actual band. Its nice to see your loyalty and dedication to your other half, however I cannot agree that a “flat” band presents any less danger then the typical women’s adorned wedding band.

1.) Almost everyone experiences some slight form of swelling in their hands when performing a highly physical activity like Aikido, running, swimming or even just going out and about when the weather changes. (I dip at least 1 size between the cold and warm mornings here) Your wedding band can constrict the circulation in your finger, causing even more swelling. In which case , if someone asks you to remove it, you cannot. This puts you and your training partner in an odd spot.

2)Here’s something to gnaw on: What if you are training with someone who is allergic to gold? I had this problem at last seminar. One of the Aikidoka I was training with was wearing his gold wedding band, and I just happen to be allergic to it. Godawful hives are not something that are fun to have to deal with :(

3) Another reason it might not be wise to train with you ring on is that A) Sweat tarnishes most metals after long enough, B) you’ll ding the living hell out of your ring ( and your training partners during most techniques that require you to grab with that hand our perform an open handed push ( IE Face plant).
I'd ask the sensei of the local dojo, but I am relocating to an as-yet unknown location right after the wedding...so I don't know what my local dojo would be! Does anyone on here wear their wedding band to train? I would hate for this to be a hindrance, but I simply can't see myself doing aikido again if it means my ring has to come off.
You’ll probably want to ask your current Sensei for a letter of introduction, as a courtesy to your next Sensei.

As to “ I simply can’t see my self doing aikido again if it means my ring has to come off…”

Well is marriage not about compromising? And Aikido not also the same? You give up personal time and space, while dedicating your self to something you love. If your dedication is equal here, you may compromise on the ring situation. Taking your ring off to train is not a sign of infidelity to your life partner, nor does it require you to abandon any of your ideals. If you take away all the rings, you’re still left with the indelible bond that you and yours have created and the life that is yours and yours alone.

The choice remains yours.

I chose not to wear my ring, and I chose to keep Aikido as “my” hobby, my thing just for my self. My fiancé Chris practiced Aikido for many years before I met him, thus he understands and encourages me to do what makes me happy. My taking my ring off does not change that we love one another, and saves a great deal of heartbreak ( and stitches).

I hope you find something that works for you and I wish you and yours the best for your future together.

Kaitlin

Qatana
04-16-2003, 11:09 AM
"Sweat tarnishes

most metals after long enough"

No, sweat will make most metals dirty.Particularly gold, which is inert, ie.. non-reactive. Chemicals in one's skin chemistry can tarnish other metals such as silver, copper or brass but even 14K gold is pure enough except for a very few highly- acidic body types. I've been in the Jewelry business all my life and only once have seen tarnish come up through gold plating. Watch out for that 10K stuff, or gold fill tho.

On another note, due to ukemi practice my belly button ring did pop out on the mat last week...

John Boswell
04-16-2003, 11:43 AM
Jenna,

Kevin, in MY opinion, was way harsh in his comments above. He can like me or not, but he was way out of line talking to you the way he did.

On the other hand, the others do make a point about the potential damage with regards to rings. I'm engaged but wear no ring yet, being the groom. I've often considered just what you are considering now: Never taking off the ring for any reason. But the fact remains there are just certain times when it is safer and more practical to not have on a ring... no matter how devoted you are.

Devotion isn't proven by wearing your ring. Devotion is proven by taking your vows, MEANING them and then living up to those vows on a daily basis. Worst wedding I ever attended was watching the bride look down at her feet and say half-heartedly "I do" and then looking up and smiling at my best friend. (...never forgive myself for not stopping everything right then.)

SAY you do.

MEAN it...

but leave the ring in the dish on the dresser at home. It'll be there when you get outta the shower. ;)

Good luck in your future married life! :)

Oh ya, don't quit Aikido!! :p

:ai: :ki: !!

Chuck Clark
04-16-2003, 12:00 PM
I have seen a wedding ring (normal size band) break two front teeth while doing a shomen ate (pushing on the chin). It made the strangest sound and the person suffered lots of pain. This, of course, was a freakish accident, but if it happened once it could happen again.

I require wedding bands to be covered with tape, but it could still break a tooth.

BC
04-16-2003, 01:23 PM
Congradulations on your engagement!

I always take off my wedding band before getting on the mat. Not for my safety, but for the safety of others. That, and my fingers fluctuate a great deal in thickness depending on the temperature and humidity, so much so that sometimes my ring could easily fly off. However, in our dojo, the rule is to please take off all jewelry, or else cover it with tape.

Another consideration is that if you practice with weapons, you might damage either your ring or the weapon.

Kevin Wilbanks
04-16-2003, 03:04 PM
A bit of a followup, re: Kevin's post. Under the guise of being an iconoclast regarding religious/idiosyncratic "zealotry," Kevin, you proceed to say "if the rules are good enough for every one else, why not you." Can't have it both ways. Calling people fools or zealots for having individual beliefs does not square with telling them to tow the party line.

People have beliefs; each to their own. I am an atheist, but would never become religious in my atheism by declaring "religious believers" are "idiosyncratic" fools, and need to convert to my way of thinking.
Speaking of high drama... I do not see the parallel you are trying to draw.

Participating in Aikido involves following certain rules and restrictions, both for the sake of safety and tradition. There is also an element of ceremony in leaving a large part of one's ego and cherished self-importance at the door, or in the dressing room with all your individualistic clothing. A large part of Aikido is about conforming to tradition and the laws of physics - it isn't some kind of freestyle, anything-goes cooperative. Theoretically, one distinguishes oneself on the mat via one's actions within the parameters of the art, not by the bravado one displays by holding oneself above the rules. Rebellion and nonconformity can be good things, but there are 20-some other hours in the day in which to stick it to the man, impose one's drama-queen antics on bystanders, etc... If one can't let go of that for an hour or two to train, it seems to me like there is a problem. On the other hand, if no one in the dojo objects to one's quirkiness, then there is no problem, but only because your kink has passed under that dojo's particular radar.

I still think posing this extreme intransigence about the ring symbolism as some kind of do-or-die showdown scenario smacks of some kind of unbudo-like egotism. Personally, I enjoy expressing such tendencies at times, but not on the mat.

As far as where, how, and in what fashion you may best worship me, check out the official website of my followers: http://www.wilbanksisgod.com

With regards to my other detractors: does the word 'milksop' mean anything to you?

Michael Neal
04-16-2003, 03:51 PM
With regards to my other detractors: does the word 'milksop' mean anything to you?
Really, so this is how you describe yourself?

:)

Paul Smith
04-16-2003, 04:42 PM
Tried the link, Kevin, couldn't be displayed. Guess it's from just too-rarefied a place. Or a room all to yourself.

As to egoism at the dojo mat, couldn't agree more. (See my previous posts). My contention is your objectively elevated rant and summary judgment of a person's character based on a simple question. Bottom line, how about we all give the scathing personal critiques a rest? "Aiki" or something to that effect.

Kevin Wilbanks
04-16-2003, 04:54 PM
Really, so this is how you describe yourself?

:)
Actually, it is inappropriate to address to use the second person here - a transgression usually punishable by summary execution. Indeed, The Exalted Supreme Overlord of the Milksops should only be referred to thusly, or as His/Your Grace, or as His/Your Excellency. No other pronouns will be tolerated.

Michael Neal
04-16-2003, 10:00 PM
Actually, it is inappropriate to address to use the second person here - a transgression usually punishable by summary execution. Indeed, The Exalted Supreme Overlord of the Milksops should only be referred to thusly, or as His/Your Grace, or as His/Your Excellency. No other pronouns will be tolerated.
I apologize for the infraction.

Leslie Parks
04-17-2003, 10:43 AM
Jenna, congratulations on your engagement. If you are more comfortable wearing your ring, wear it. Over the years, I've seen people wear their rings, not wear their rings. Everyone has their own preference. My best advice is try it and see how it feels.

However, as a like owner of a plain 4 mm platinum band, I may be a little closer in what you will experience. After I was married, I thought, 'Yeah, I'll wear the wedding band on the mat!' I lasted 20 minutes. While our nice narrow bands are unobtrusive in daily life, that same narrow quality becomes a thin piece of metal digging into the bone of your finger when some joint lock is applied. Oh, and being platinum, it is a REALLY HARD thin piece of metal digging into the bone of your finger.

And since my hand was injured in a car accident last month and they had to cut my rings off at the hospital, I can tell you getting platinum cut off is no picnic(what..the hardest metal?).

twilliams423
04-17-2003, 03:30 PM
I had a new student join my class recently. She had on a friendship bracelet, one of those woven twine/thread thingies.

I gave the standard instructions to the new group she was with re: jewelry, etc. Basically leave it at home, it's unsafe for reasons covered in all the previous posts, plus my own special set of reasons which have to do with not needing adornment to enhance our desirability on the mat (this one covers make-up, perfume/cologne, low cut dogi tops with hiphuggers, baseball caps worn sideways). Pleez, hook-up on your own time! And I specifically requested that she not wear it in class.

Well... it was special, it had this meaning and attachment, she's had it for sooo... long.

But, odious ogre that I am, I think Aikido is special too. And I think that one has to make choices in life. And here's the first one for her involving Aikido.

So, next class she's got an elastic bandage on her wrist, the kind with the two metal clips that hold it in place. No, it's not to cover the forbidden item, she's sprained her wrist.

OK, but the bandage has to go because the metal clips are not going to fly. Nor can one weasle out of following the rules so easily. (I said I was a meanie).

Long story short : No longer training in my class. My opinion, I saved her maybe two weeks before she would have dropped out anyway (is that too cynical?).

Moral to this story? (multiple choice-I'm a teacher) A. Leave the ring at home. B. Tape over it to fake out the teacher C. Find a new dojo that doesn't care D. Quit Aikido while your ahead

Tom

Alfonso
04-17-2003, 03:54 PM
Wow, aren't the chances of getting a broken tooth from a wedding band rather lower than dying from shihonage on your head?

wow, love the argument.

was losing a student over a wedding bad good? I've practiced for years with mine on, and discovered that

a) it's not an available handle for nage(unlike earrings, noserings, brow-rings, pony tails, braids, long fingernails)

b) if you crunch my fingers hard (sempai did this to get me to take it off) the fingers hurt ; the ring and finger combo in my case doesn't do much to alter that)

c) most of the time i'm not even aware of it, so I kept going to the mat with it on, in spite of my best intentions

Michael Neal
04-17-2003, 08:43 PM
I think I will wear my ring to class just to spite some of the people here :)

Andrew Wilson
04-18-2003, 12:08 AM
I was flipping through a book called "moving to stillness" by Dave Lowery (I believe.) at either rate, the story was entitled "get a new wife".

There once was a guy who was walking in the park and he ran into this guy who was a falconer. He said to the falconer, man I really wanted to learn how to do this, but my wife would never let me spend the time out here that you do. the falconer replied "get a new wife."

Sure he was prolly just kidding, but life is about sacrifices and commitments. Budo isn't something to take lightly, its a serious commitment. If my girlfriend wouldnt let me train, I would consider what sort of life I would lead with her if I was not allowed to make a choice.

This is sort of simular, if you dont want to take your ring off because of some vow... then dont. Just dont plan on training in a school that has rules against the wearing of a ring.

Andrew Wilson
04-18-2003, 12:11 AM
I think I will wear my ring to class just to spite some of the people here :)
I dont think I could train with someone who didn't respect the rules of the dojo. I was taught its your job to take care of your partner and if your wearing a ring is potentialy dangerous, your not doing a good job of that.

-A

Michael Neal
04-18-2003, 07:36 AM
I dont think I could train with someone who didn't respect the rules of the dojo. I was taught its your job to take care of your partner and if your wearing a ring is potentialy dangerous, your not doing a good job of that.

-A
My point is that all of you are taking this ring thing way too seriously. Maybe not wearing a ring for safety reasons is a good idea but those here that try at turn it into some sort of sacrifice for the art Aikido is ridiculous.

Kevin Wilbanks
04-18-2003, 08:07 AM
My point is that all of you are taking this ring thing way too seriously. Maybe not wearing a ring for safety reasons is a good idea but those here that try at turn it into some sort of sacrifice for the art Aikido is ridiculous.
Actually, if you'll recall, it was the original poster who was all prepared to cast it as some sort of big either/or drama, prior to the situation ever arising, which was what I was responding to. Personally, I think a wedding ring is unobtrusive enough not to be much of a hazard to others, but if the sensei/school wants it off for reasons of safety or a level ego playing field, I don't think there should be exceptions.

aikidoc
04-18-2003, 11:36 AM
I feel this is purely a safety issue for both parties. It would not be a pleasant experience to catch your ring on another person's ring as you were being thrown in the opposite direction. The other issue is the possibility of cuts and blood borne pathogens.

I do not allow jewelry on the mat except in the case of body jewelry which won't come off aand then I admonish great care. It is just not worth the risk to lose an ear lobe, strangle someone with a necklace on or lose a finger over.

Kelly Allen
04-19-2003, 04:54 AM
OW MY FINGER! OW MY KNEE!:eek:

PhilJ
04-19-2003, 10:56 PM
How about wearing an earring while working with someone who uses your head in irminage? OUCH! :) (That happened to me once)

I usually take my rings off (don't wear my earring much anymore) simply because they hurt my hands during some techniques. I wear particularly thick bands which are incompatible with a nice, tight ikkyo pin. :) One of those usually dissuades nage from wearing a ring.

Chains, protruding jewelry, bracelets, watches.. I like to see them come off "just in case".

*Phil

taras
04-20-2003, 12:15 AM
I have been married for 2.5 years and my wedding ring never came off apart from two occasions. Once when I was washing my hands it slipped off and I caught it before it went down the sink. A couple of hours later I had first almighty argument with my wife and she ran away to her parents crying. Logically there was no connection between those two incidents. The second time, a year after the first one, I was asked to remove my ring by a doctor when I broke my knuckle (on another finger). I removed it for about five minutes and two days later my wife and I were threatening each other with a divorce; no logical connection either.

I am not trying to prove anything, only telling you what happened.

According to Feng Shui certain things (physical objects) can represent aspects of our lives. Some people have wedding photographs in their bedrooms etc; some believe in always wearing rings. Such a belief does not prove luck of dedication to Aikido.

I also have a nipple ring, which cannot be removed. I put plasters on both rings and it feels quite safe. I agree, a plaster would not prevent an injury if someone landed on your ring, but what I figured out for myself is to practice awareness at all times.

If you are being thrown in a crowded dojo and there is a chance that you hit someone else as you are rolling, whose responsibility should it be to prevent an impact? I think nage should take care where uke is being thrown and make sure there is space for him/her to roll. Uke should be aware of surroundings and avoid rolling into other people. People training near should be aware of others. Accidents do happen for all sorts of reasons but should Aikidoka not practice awareness? Did OSensei not ask his students to attack him unexpectedly?

I recently winessed an accident, which freaked a lot of people out. After a shihonage someone landed on his elbow and cracked a couple of ribs. Had he executed proper ukemi the accident would not happen. It was tragic but I am sure he is not going to do it again. My point is, practice awareness. I wonder how difficult it would be for a samurai to execute a roll wearing two swords, possibly a knife and having long hair with a pin? Oh, and hakama, of course.

I see taking care of my two rings and my long hair as an addtitional challenge. And after all, accidents happen anywhere, not only in the dojo, like so many exaples in this thread show.

Disclaimer: this is only what I figured for myself, I am not suggesting that anyone follows my example.

Kelly Allen
04-20-2003, 07:36 AM
And if he was wearing a gold elbow jewlery thingy he would have killed himself instead.:dead: Good thing he wasn't.:rolleyes: ;) :p :D

Paul Smith
04-20-2003, 09:10 PM
Ok, IT'S A BAND. If you can do damage to me with this unobtrusive thing on my finger, or I to you, then one of us deserves the title of Musashi II, for chrissakes. I have a hard time believing this little thing of gold can be anything at all when training, which is what lead to my original post. If you have a secret -ryu of waza with a closely held gold band, then either better keep it secret, or share it with the world, friends.

Kelly Allen
04-23-2003, 05:27 AM
rrrriiiiinnnnnnggg rrrriiiinnnnnggg

hello!

TAKE IT OFF!

CLICK

I hate crank calls!

jxa127
04-23-2003, 08:33 AM
Ok, IT'S A BAND. If you can do damage to me with this unobtrusive thing on my finger, or I to you, then one of us deserves the title of Musashi II, for chrissakes. I have a hard time believing this little thing of gold can be anything at all when training, which is what lead to my original post. If you have a secret -ryu of waza with a closely held gold band, then either better keep it secret, or share it with the world, friends.
Well, we would share it with the world, but then the commercialization would kill the mystique. Still, if you'd like to become a student and you are willing to study for years, you can sign the blood oath tomorrow and start training right away.

One of the first things we'll show you is how to block a killing sword strike with you wedding band. You won't learn the hiden, killing techniques until much later, of course.

For specifics of our instructor's lineage and details about the art, send an e-mail to: thisisjustajoke@budoryustuff.com

Regards,

-Drew

Paul Smith
04-23-2003, 09:27 AM
Drew-san:

Thank you for the generous offer - you must know my character already, else you wouldn't extend such a sacred path so easily. I have studied already in the sacred esoteric arts, so my lot is filled.

However, as a special bonus, for your kind offer, in addition to receiving 1 chef's knife, 1 paring knife, 1 serrated edge knife and 275,012 steak knives, I invite you to train in the only legitimate esoteric art form left:

http://www.yellowbamboo.com/

Please keep a lid on it, though. Dilution is always a danger.

And don't send money now, send it when you grab your checkbook.

:-)

MattRice
04-23-2003, 11:24 AM
when I first started, I left it on. One of the instructors commented that if I break my finger (not an unrealistic possibility in martial arts) that it may have to be cut off. Why risk losing the ring entirely OR doing more damage then would have been done without the ring?

On the other hand (NPI) it probably won't hurt anyone else...so it's your ring and finger to risk!

kendo52
04-23-2003, 01:55 PM
I marrried another doka after about 5 years of training. We both agreed that when on the mat, it was "BUDO TIME" and neither of us hold back anything when training with each other. (However, some throws do make for interesting dinner conversation) In short, we train as individials and move down the path at our own speeds, repecting each other along the way. But, the rings come off.



To be frighteningly honest here, I have to tell you the one time i forgot to take it off right before I stepped onto the mat I felt.....dirty. Sometimes when a new student comes and doesn't cover up a ring i feel it makes them dirty. I apologize if this offends someone, but training for me is purification -wearing a beautiful adornment to the body takes away from the true beauty that you're cultivating on the mat - YOUR SPIRIT!!!!!!!!

VinceFont
04-24-2003, 01:43 PM
Let's get real people. I have been married for 18 years, have three kids and still love my wife with all my heart...but I take my wedding band off everytime I enter the mat and leave the ring in my car (never in the locker room since you are bound to loose it in time).

First, even a simple wedding band can hurt you and what's worse, your uke. At the very least, they can scratch your partner.

Second, although I respect your love for your fiance and your desire to communicate the feeling to the world by wearing your ring, we are talking about 1-2 hourse of not wearing the silly ring and your fiance will not love you any less for not wearing it for such a short period of time.

Anyway, I know how you feel (I was in your shoes years ago) but keep all jewelry out of the training mat, please.

:o

Mallory Wikoff
04-24-2003, 09:32 PM
You may want to take off your ring if you have a diamond or something sticking out of it. First of all.. if it hits someone on accedent it's going to hurt. Also it has a chance of falling out of the ring... Wouldn't that be a nightmare!

Bronson
04-25-2003, 01:10 AM
Just wondering and maybe stirring the pot a little :p In the dojo that don't allow rings to be worn, do they allow glasses? Rings with no protrusions are worn in our dojo, as well as glasses. I've seen waaaaaay more injuries because of glasses than rings. I know glasses are needed to see, heck without mine I can't read my own name embroidered on my sleeve. But we could be told to leave them on to see the demonstration and take them off to practice, or get contacts, or those prescription googgle thingys that strap to your head.

Just wondering,

Bronson

Kelly Allen
04-25-2003, 01:57 AM
Just wondering and maybe stirring the pot a little :p In the dojo that don't allow rings to be worn, do they allow glasses? Rings with no protrusions are worn in our dojo, as well as glasses. I've seen waaaaaay more injuries because of glasses than rings. I know glasses are needed to see, heck without mine I can't read my own name embroidered on my sleeve. But we could be told to leave them on to see the demonstration and take them off to practice, or get contacts, or those prescription googgle thingys that strap to your head.

Just wondering,

Bronson
I leave my glasses on while watching sensei explain a technique, or trying the technique slowly/moderatly. When the training goes full bore during the techniques or randori the glasses, and the gloves, come off. :cool:

opherdonchin
04-25-2003, 10:43 AM
I trained with an orthodox jew who kept his skull cap on during training. It would, of course, regularly come off during rolls, but he got very good at catching it in the air with one hand while he was rolling. It was actually pretty impressive.

Anyway, nobody ever got injured by the skull cap, as far as I know.

Paul Smith
04-25-2003, 12:38 PM
I once trained with someone with horribly bad breath. Not to bad, as long as he maintained hara breathing, and breathed through his navel. When he let loose with chest breathing, though, and expressed through his mouth, tragedy. Ambulances called, utter mayhem.

Kelly Allen
04-26-2003, 01:47 AM
I trained with an orthodox jew who kept his skull cap on during training. It would, of course, regularly come off during rolls, but he got very good at catching it in the air with one hand while he was rolling. It was actually pretty impressive.

Anyway, nobody ever got injured by the skull cap, as far as I know.
What an unorthodox Orthodox Jew:confused: .

I'm sorry I just couldn't restist.:D