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Dave Porter
02-13-2003, 08:37 PM
Hey everyone, Quick question. I've searched and searched, and I can't get a hard definition of Shugyo. From what I've read and been told, it means different things to different people. As near as I can figure, my definition is "Intense training and Dedication to ones art." Is that correct or at least nearly? Thanks for any help. ~Dave~

PeterR
02-13-2003, 08:43 PM
I would say a period of intense training.

For example.

Two summers ago I returned to Japan and trained hard every day for three months. That was Shugyo.

We just had the winter Gashko which I did not attend. For those that did - that was Shugyo.

It's not just showing up and practicing either - the self driven intensity is important.

Thomas Froman
02-13-2003, 08:47 PM
I think that is close. In the excellent book Aikido Shugyo, even though no clear definition is given Shugyo is explained as " 'ascetic training' , constant training in order to unite body, mind and heart." I hope that helps.

Greg Jennings
02-13-2003, 09:32 PM
I usually think there is an element of self denial in addition to intensity.

Best Regards,

Chris Li
02-14-2003, 12:09 AM
I think that is close. In the excellent book Aikido Shugyo, even though no clear definition is given Shugyo is explained as " 'ascetic training' , constant training in order to unite body, mind and heart." I hope that helps.
Basically, it means any kind of intensive study or training. I believe that the word has it's roots in Buddhist ascetic training, but today it's used for everything from Budo training to studying for the Junior High school entrance exams.

Best,

Chris

Bronson
02-17-2003, 12:42 AM
From Dave Lowry's "Sword and Brush"

"Shugyo: Austerity

Too early in the morning? Get up and train. Cold and wet outside? Go train. Tired? Weary of the whole journey and longing just for a moment to stop and rest? Train. Continue on in the spirit of perseverance-this is the advice for the bugeisha who reaches an obstacle in the Way, as surely he will. It is advice that will be lost on the novice. The beginner's enthusiasm is such that he cannot imagine what blocks could lie ahead to halt his progress. If some decisive challenge to his continuing on does appear at this early stage, he will likely abandon his practice altogether. The art has not yet penetrated into his daily life. It can be quit without damage to the psyche. It is the more advanced bugeisha who must face dilemmas and potential obstructions that can have serious emotional and psychological consequences. It is shugyo to which he must turn at these times if he expects to overcome and persevere."

Dave Porter
02-20-2003, 09:03 PM
Thats the Answer I relate to the most. Thanks to all who posted. ~Dave~

Peter Goldsbury
02-21-2003, 05:07 AM
In Japanese there are two ways of writing the word: 修業 and 修行. Gozo Shioda uses the second way, which has a stronger sense of asceticism and austerity, like serving out an apprenticeship, as a deshi, for example. Written in the first way, it can also mean completing a course of study.

Best regards,