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Kieun
12-19-2002, 01:29 PM
Had a question about how one learns the aikido curriculum. There are so many pins and so many throws, and there are the handful of different attack patterns. Then there are the hanmi handachi and suwari wazas. OK, given that, and really talking about weapons work at all (altho of course that's immportant too), how are all the different techniques/curriculum material covered in your schools? It seems that in many aikido schools, the techniques you learn in a given session is of the sensei's choice. It does not seem to really follow a step-by-step outline. The exception (from what I've read) is in Yoshinkan, where I am told things are more structured and systematic. Is this an accurate description? If so, how is a student supposed to get all the materials? What if he misses the classes where a certain technique done in a certain way was taught - is it just assumed that if you go to enuf practices it'll come around again? Thanks.

Bronson
12-19-2002, 02:31 PM
is it just assumed that if you go to enuf practices it'll come around again?

Pretty much, yeah.

Bronson

MikeE
12-19-2002, 02:56 PM
Yes. That about sums it up.

But, remember that technique is just an expression of a principle. You can learn many techniques that will have the same underlying principle.

I know that's how I teach. Different techniques...same principles.

deepsoup
12-20-2002, 03:11 PM
Had a question about how one learns the aikido curriculum. There are so many pins and so many throws, and there are the handful of different attack patterns. Then there are the hanmi handachi and suwari wazas. OK, given that, and really talking about weapons work at all (altho of course that's immportant too), how are all the different techniques/curriculum material covered in your schools?
One at a time, maybe? :)
The exception (from what I've read) is in Yoshinkan, where I am told things are more structured and systematic. Is this an accurate description? If so, how is a student supposed to get all the materials? What if he misses the classes where a certain technique done in a certain way was taught - is it just assumed that if you go to enuf practices it'll come around again?
Shodokan is also very systematic.

But you're quite right, if you miss a class you miss something, and if you keep training you'll see it again some other time.

Sean

x

opherdonchin
12-20-2002, 04:46 PM
Hey Kieun, maybe as a beginner you could put in your two cents on Jun's thread about teaching methods that is currently active.

Opher

SeiserL
12-21-2002, 10:10 AM
I watch my Sensei before each class. He looks at who is there and teaches what they need to learn. After a while, I abondoned the need for structure and replaced it with trust. My training improved.

Until again,

Lynn