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jxa127
10-02-2000, 08:13 AM
All,

I'm an adult student at Penn State (Harrisburg campus) working toward a degree in Communications. I'm taking a magazine editing class for which I need to write a feature article. I've decided to write my article on ikkyo.

Here's my premise: O Sensei has said something to the effect that when you understand ikkyo, you'll understand Aikido. Recent conversations on this board have mentioned ikkyo in the context of its relationship with the ikkajo of Daito-ryu (as in Sensei Kondoís interview). So, what Iíd like to do is discuss the origins of ikkyo, and explore the importance of this seemingly simple technique to our study of Aikido.

There are only two problems: I donít have many Aikido books or tapes, and I really donít have a lot of experience in Aikido. So Iím asking for help. Would you all:

(1) please share any quotes from your books on ikkyo (not technical how-to stuff, though) with good citations, and

(2) share your thoughts on any aspect of ikkyo you find important. Please include your style, location, and rank so that I can properly give you credit.

I may also ask to follow up on some comments in e-mail messages.

My intent is not to solve the mystery behind O Senseiís comment, but to simply present an intelligent discussion on a fundamental technique. Iím also planning on including a whole bunch of photos Iíll take in my dojo. :-)

I only have a few weeks to write the article, so quick help is needed. I will, of course, post the final result somewhere and provide a link so you folks can see it.

Thank you very much in advance,

-Drew Ames

P.S. Hereís a specific quetion: Why is ikkyo so difficult to master?

andrew
10-02-2000, 12:39 PM
jxa127 wrote:
Hereís a specific quetion: Why is ikkyo so difficult to master?


Because you have to move your entire body correctly to bring somebody down without giving them any openings along the way. Body movements can't be adequately described or understood in words alone or observation alone: doing it repeatedly is the only satisfactory solution, under good guidance, if you can find it... blah de blah blah...
andrew

stratcat
10-02-2000, 05:46 PM
I believe the quote you are refering to is found in John Stevens' "The Secrets Of Aikido" (Shambala Publications, 1993), I forget the page exactly, wherein O'Sensei went into the dojo to teach some techniques. However, all the techniques he taught appeared to be Ikkyo.

One student said, "Sensei, what is the difference between all those techniques? They seemed the same."

O'Sensei immediately thundered back, "When you see the difference between these techniques you will have understood Aikido!"

I'm not sure he meant it literally, but rather when you learn to look BETWEEN the techniques (to the essence) you will have mastered Aikido. I could be very wrong though, so don't take my word for it. ;)

In any case, Ikkyo is very important in Aikido, because it is one of the first techniques taught, as well as one of the simplest. Let's remember, however, that SIMPLE doesn't necessarily mean EASY or easy to master. It is also one of the most effective takedowns. Ask any cop.

Hope this helps.

stratcat
10-02-2000, 05:54 PM
I believe the quote you are refering to is found in John Stevens' "The Secrets Of Aikido" (Shambala Publications, 1993), I forget the page exactly, wherein O'Sensei went into the dojo to teach some techniques. However, all the techniques he taught appeared to be Ikkyo.

One student said, "Sensei, what is the difference between all those techniques? They seemed the same."

O'Sensei immediately thundered back, "When you see the difference between these techniques you will have understood Aikido!"

I'm not sure he meant it literally, but rather when you learn to look BETWEEN the techniques (to the essence) you will have mastered Aikido. I could be very wrong though, so don't take my word for it. ;)

In any case, Ikkyo is very important in Aikido, because it is one of the first techniques taught, as well as one of the simplest. Let's remember, however, that SIMPLE doesn't necessarily mean EASY or easy to master. It is also one of the most effective takedowns. Ask any cop.

Some books you might want to check out: Saotome Sensei's "Principles of Aikido" and "Aikido and the Harmony of Nature"; John Stevens' "The Essence of Aikido" and "The Secrets of Aikido" as well as his biography of O'Sensei; Dosshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba's "The Spirit of Aikido". Ask your instructors, they'll point you in the right direction.
Hope this helps.

andrew
10-03-2000, 05:59 AM
stratcat wrote:
Dosshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba's "The Spirit of Aikido".

Yes, that was a good book.
andrew

jxa127
10-04-2000, 11:41 AM
Thanks for the responses so far, guys. Keep 'em coming.

-Drew

Paul
10-24-2000, 05:07 AM
I think ikkyo's title is very important, its "real" name is ude osae although O'sensei chose to call it Ikkyo, first princple/technique and the following techniques nikyo and so on. I feel he did this since all other pins and one could argue the nage waza also are built on this foundation, this first principle. If you don't understand ikkyo how can you ever hope to understand ni/san/yon/go kyo. Budo begins and ends with Rei.
It might be said that Osae begins and ends with ikkyo.

Regards Paul

Fabris
10-24-2000, 08:58 AM
Hi everyone,

Once I read an interview of one of O Sensei's ushideshi (can't remember his name as much as I try)and he said that when he first started training he thought that Aikido was about 500 techniques but when he really got enough experience he figured out that it was about 100, then 50, then 10 and finally he came to the idea that Aikido was about just 1 technique and he trains that one all the time.

Could that be ikkyo? Anyone else remember that interview?

FabrŪcio Lemos, Brazil Aikikai