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akiy
09-28-2000, 12:44 PM
Injuries are an inevitable part of aikido training. How do you approach and handle injuries and such in your training?

-- Jun

chillzATL
09-29-2000, 03:27 PM
Depends on the injury really. Some I just I've just worked around, some have caused me to have to take extended vacations from class. When I younger I usually ignored the pain only to pay dearly years later. I try to be more careful now than I was back then. I used to pay little attention to what might happen because the young body heals pretty quickly, I took that for granted. Now that things ache a little longer I have to respect the injuries more.

Gatekeeper
10-01-2000, 09:31 PM
I've seen many people suffer injuries in the years I've been training. Most often I see it occur with people who are overextending themselves. I know, I too, have been guilty of this sometimes even though I try not to.
As to deal with them... if they are serious take time off, this in mandatory, in the dojo I train at if you are injured you are required to take time off. It's policy. If it's not to serious just lay off the offended part or live though it. Sometimes working though discomfort is the best.
I like to think of it in the terms my Sensei uses, "You can train though discomfort but you cannot and should not train though pain."

ian
10-20-2000, 11:03 AM
I've trained in 1st aid myself, and I always keep a first aid kit with me. I also bear in mind the procedure for calling an ambulance (where to call from, who I would send) for more serious injuries, and keep reminding myself of the common unjuries which occur in the dojo.

Injury prevention is the best thing. I do like a very vigorous style of aikido with a good aggressive attack, however nage should be measured in their response and take consideration of beginners - there should be no toleration of people who want to 'prove' a technique on a beginner by spraining a joint or being overtly aggressive. Some advanced practitioners may want to show how 'practical' their aikido is, but I think they miss the point if an injury is caused. Dealing with that is difficult but something like 'try and control/feel the technique more' or something a bit sterner may help. It is also useful to start slow with a technique and only increase in speed and power when you know the blending is there.

Most injuries are toe/finger nail removals (make sure everyone gets them cut), people being knocked unconcious, sprains from joit locks, or people being hit by whirling weapons.

Sometimes people get an elbow in the face from an atemi, but usually this is superficial and helps people to develop awareness (as long as there is no bad feeling). Also, if you like good firm stationary grabs every so often (which I am prone to) you get bruising where the fingers dug in which doesn't cause any problems (except when you get home to your wife/girlfriend).

oudbruin
07-04-2004, 10:01 PM
Since I'm still a beginner, my ukemi isn't very good. However, I've had several situations where a yudansha have really used more force than necessary to show the technique.
One situation resulted in my getting a hyperextended elbow. No doubt about it, Aikido is powerfull JUJU. In the wrong / strong/ or egotistical hands injury is just a twitch away with the inexperienced partner.
I will say that as I am getting older the injuries seem to come more quickly, and I spend more time thinking about what I am going to do. Dealing with people with spinal injury all days makes matters worse, since I'm having a real mental battle with a forward roll.

SeiserL
07-05-2004, 10:09 PM
Injuries are an inevitable part of aikido training. How do you approach and handle injuries and such in your training?

As you said, injuries are an inevitable part of training. What's the question?

I usually carry tape with me. If I break another toe again, I pull it, set it, and tape it to the other toe.

We have a first aid kit at the Dojo, if need be we use it.

Mostly, we just look after each other and try to get beyond the macho ego stuff and tell each other when its hurting. Most people are great about it because we have all been there many time.

We do bet on whether newbies will come back after that first injury.

Bridge
07-06-2004, 07:08 AM
Sometimes people get an elbow in the face from an atemi, but usually this is superficial and helps people to develop awareness (as long as there is no bad feeling). Also, if you like good firm stationary grabs every so often (which I am prone to) you get bruising where the fingers dug in which doesn't cause any problems (except when you get home to your wife/girlfriend).

Whereupon girlfriend/wife pokes fun at the injury?

Well, that's what I do when boyf comes home with bruises. Especially the ones where there are 5 distinct finger shaped bruises!

Anyone else do that? Or am I just mean?

ian
07-06-2004, 07:18 AM
Injuries are not a necessary part of training. Training should be tough at times, but injuries just reduce training time and confidence.

We have a first aid kit and an injury report book. I make any changes that could reasonably be made to prevent such injuries in the future.

Ian