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View Full Version : Sensitivity, reflex and reactionary time in Aikido training.


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Brian Sutton
03-08-2017, 09:51 PM
True or false? So if I react before I'm attacked , my experience and technique could be fair/average and I would be in a better position than if I don't see an attack coming(disclaimer: if your wondering why I would ask about being attacked, than please enjoy the exercise of Aikido and there's no real need to read further or respond to this post.) and I had a seasoned repertoire of dazzling techniques. In an Aikido dojo, I'm employing a training partner and an agreement of roles,reactions, and responses. Does your Aikido training improve your reflex / reactionary response time in a controlled setting of action and reaction? Beginners have to learn this way, but does this nage/uke relationship really improve reflexes and reactionary time as we become more familiar with techniques and movements become faster. If the nage/uke agreement and relationship remains fairly the same while speed and familiarity of techniques increase. Not to negate Aikido training and muscle memory, however how do you improve sensitivity to changes arising in your environment and improve your reactionary and reflex time in your Aikido training?

StephanS
03-09-2017, 02:13 AM
So if I react before I'm attacked
So what are you reacting to here exactly?

SeiserL
03-09-2017, 02:59 PM
Yes, sensitivity/reflex/reactions can be trained.
The question is, do you focus on improving them?

lbb
03-10-2017, 11:55 AM
The phrase you want is "reaction time". "Reactionary time" means something very different. Heh.

philipsmith
03-17-2017, 04:39 AM
In sports science there is something called the speed of anticipation; where the performer reads minute visual cues prior to the action and responds accordingly rather than waiting for the action to begin.

I suspect that is what the OP means by reactionary time.

PeterR
03-17-2017, 05:10 AM
In sports science there is something called the speed of anticipation; where the performer reads minute visual cues prior to the action and responds accordingly rather than waiting for the action to begin.

I suspect that is what the OP means by reactionary time.

The old ''Sen sen no sen''. It can be trained.

philipsmith
03-17-2017, 05:56 AM
Couldn't have put it better myself.
Here's the evidence (for Karate) https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kuniyasu_Imanaka/publication/11220203_Reaction_time_and_anticipatory_skills_of_Karate_athletes/links/02e7e5271caf127639000000.pdf