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Bronson
09-04-2002, 01:13 AM
Do you guys ever find yourself teaching "made up" techniques? What I mean by that is, you teach a technique that you've never been taught. I'm sure somewhere somebody has already done it but you've never seen it before. You teach it and you know how it works, the mistakes to watch for, and you can explain it and teach other people to do it...even though you've never done it before yourself. I sometimes find myself teaching something and thinking "where the heck did THAT come from?"

Whenever this happens I always check with with sensei the next time I see him. I show him the technique and how I taught it and ask if it was ok to do that. He has never told me "no". He has given tips and pointers but for the most part he's ok with it.

I was just wondering if anyone else has had it happen.

Thanks,
Bronson

ian
09-04-2002, 03:33 AM
I think some people treat martial arts techniques as something magical, however most of them were just developed by seeing what worked (and some come from anatomical studies).

I've not seen a 'new' technique (other than weird strikes) in many years, though there must be countless variations. Aikido forms a complete whole for me and I can't think where there are more techniques. Many of the same techniques were developed independently both in the east and west. (I was reading somewhere that there is a greek statue with one wrestler putting sankyo on another).

Ian

Jermaine Alley
09-18-2002, 03:25 PM
Hey Guys...

When i think about the concept of "making up techniques", i am reminded of the concept of Takemusu Aiki,Unlimited martial creativity. I think that i read somewhere that there are over 3,000 variations of techniques out there. I don't know of anyone who thinks that they have seen everyone..even the head of my system that has been in aikido for over 50years.

It is at that moment, when you think that you have seen it all, that someone might surprise you with a new way of doing the same old sankyo or nikyo.

I think that i also read somewhere that it is alright, to come up with "new" techniques, becuase it means that your mind is constantly working. It is a good way to stay interested also.

Who cares if you "come up" with a new technique as long as it has the aiki principles to go along with it...off balancing, atemi etc.

I don't think that it should be shunned at all...

jermaine

kironin
09-18-2002, 04:48 PM
Do you guys ever find yourself teaching "made up" techniques? What I mean by that is, you teach a technique that you've never been taught. I'm sure somewhere somebody has already done it but you've never seen it before. You teach it and you know how it works, the mistakes to watch for, and you can explain it and teach other people to do it...even though you've never done it before yourself. I sometimes find myself teaching something and thinking "where the heck did THAT come from?"
All the time. :)

Though usually its a riff or variation of a standard technque in response to a non-standard aikido attack. Sometimes it's something that has come out of my personal freestyle practice but it also comes out after something that pops up from teaching a series of standard techniques and then someone has a question.

Like last night....

the technique just formed itself in response to the attack and I was able to provide technical pointers to help the students do it more effectively because my body just knew what felt right to drop uke like a rock without effort despite a vigorous non-cooperative attack.

that stuff is a lot of fun when it comes up!

Craig

ze'ev erlich
09-19-2002, 09:12 AM
I just rmember reading about o-sensei, who was once asked to repeat a technique he did before. He said that it is impossible for him to do that. So, can you do that?

DanielR
09-19-2002, 09:19 AM
I just rmember reading about o-sensei, who was once asked to repeat a technique he did before. He said that it is impossible for him to do that. So, can you do that?
Hi Zeev,

(a bit off-topic) Thanks again for the opportunity to train in your dojo back in June. Mr. and Mrs. Numata send you their best wishes and thank you for the book.

Back to the topic - as a beginner, I'm really counting on my senseis' ability to repeat a technique. Otherwise it would be awfully hard to learn ;)

ze'ev erlich
09-20-2002, 09:06 AM
Hi Zeev,
Thank you Daniel :rolleyes:

SeiserL
09-20-2002, 10:26 AM
"You never step in the same river twice." The name of the river and the place may be the same, but the water isn't beause it flows. I too found it frustrating that I would slight variations in Phong Sensei's waza each time he did it. Later I understodd, that its impossible to do it exactly the same way twice because of difference in energy. The basic principle are always there.

Until again,

Lynn