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john2054
10-13-2016, 04:40 PM
Hi everyone, after things coming to quite a messy end at my last club, i have joined a new one and have my first grading coming up later this month.

Also my mental health is under control, with my wife acting as my primary carer.

Thanks for your blessings.

PS I also graduated with a 2.1 in July.

robin_jet_alt
10-13-2016, 08:19 PM
Hope it goes well, but what's a 2.1?

bball197046
11-30-2016, 12:20 PM
I am 46 and would love to try aikido. Apart from being kinda old....lol, I had my hip replaced about a year ago. Could my hip handle aikido?

PeterR
11-30-2016, 01:33 PM
I'm not your doctor (check) or your potential teacher (ask) but there should be no issues. There may need to be some adjustments - but we all have to do that as we get older.

rugwithlegs
11-30-2016, 04:14 PM
As an Aikikai student, I am not proud to say this...

The Ki Society has a training method associated with very little injuries. Yoshinkan and Tomiki are supposed to be "rougher" but also have solo training methods (easier to move at your own rehab speed) and exercises that do not require falls every time. Iwama Ryu and others are heavier into weapons, which means solo work and training that doesn't require taking a fall every single time. Aikikai is less much uniform but (IMO) seems to have the least developed approach to injuries and solo exercises overall. Again, not true of every school. I remember articles of people training to impress ages, and they were Ki Society or Yoshinkan students.

Joint replacements aren't considered permanent and they can become dislodged. It will be good to take care of it.

Aikido practice can be very different the world over. Watch the practice, give it a try. If you see pure highfalls for an hour straight (been there, done that) every class early on, I would be concerned for you. Teachers aren't all the same - I started out with a dojo with several medical professionals teaching. They enjoyed bringing their knowledge to the mat, and they knew how to help a student.

The guy I saw injure the most people was a business major in college and had an understanding of technique and anatomy that amounted to, "go through the pain until it feels good." No matter how much a particular movement caused pain, he did not allow students to adapt the practice. Combined with encouraging alcohol use and sleep deprivation for "special practices" and it was a bad idea.

Listen to your body and use your own good sense.

Peter Goldsbury
11-30-2016, 04:55 PM
Hope it goes well, but what's a 2.1?

A 2-1 is an upper second class honours degree from a UK university. There are several honour levels: first class honours; second class honours division one; second class honours division two; third class honours; pass (no honours at all); fail.

So I think John 2054 deserves some congratulations on a good achievement, which I thinks marks a new phase in his life.

Best wishes,

fatebass21
12-31-2016, 12:49 PM
Good luck at the new club John

john2054
01-15-2017, 09:32 AM
A 2-1 is an upper second class honours degree from a UK university. There are several honour levels: first class honours; second class honours division one; second class honours division two; third class honours; pass (no honours at all); fail.

So I think John 2054 deserves some congratulations on a good achievement, which I thinks marks a new phase in his life.

Best wishes,

That's right Pete. I still haven't been able to get a paying job since finishing, but i have been doing a voluntary social media job for the last three or so months, just once a week if that, in an office. Also i passed my yellow belt test (5th) kyu in the club HQ recently, which tired me out, and i have had some time off since then.

It is all very well putting 100% in, but sometimes it is good to relax. Aikido will always be there.

john2054
01-15-2017, 09:34 AM
I am 46 and would love to try aikido. Apart from being kinda old....lol, I had my hip replaced about a year ago. Could my hip handle aikido?

Chris, there is normally some throwing and rolling. You will need to talk to your doctor/consultant, and also find a local club, who is willing to train with you.

As long as you do this, and explain to the sensei your condition, i think there is a good chance that they will agree. Maybe just not throw you.

The last thing you want to do is dislocate your hip hip? Can you walk okay on it?

john2054
01-15-2017, 10:36 AM
Hope it goes well, but what's a 2.1?

I am 46 and would love to try aikido. Apart from being kinda old....lol, I had my hip replaced about a year ago. Could my hip handle aikido?

I'm not your doctor (check) or your potential teacher (ask) but there should be no issues. There may need to be some adjustments - but we all have to do that as we get older.

As an Aikikai student, I am not proud to say this...

The Ki Society has a training method associated with very little injuries. Yoshinkan and Tomiki are supposed to be "rougher" but also have solo training methods (easier to move at your own rehab speed) and exercises that do not require falls every time. Iwama Ryu and others are heavier into weapons, which means solo work and training that doesn't require taking a fall every single time. Aikikai is less much uniform but (IMO) seems to have the least developed approach to injuries and solo exercises overall. Again, not true of every school. I remember articles of people training to impress ages, and they were Ki Society or Yoshinkan students.

Joint replacements aren't considered permanent and they can become dislodged. It will be good to take care of it.

Aikido practice can be very different the world over. Watch the practice, give it a try. If you see pure highfalls for an hour straight (been there, done that) every class early on, I would be concerned for you. Teachers aren't all the same - I started out with a dojo with several medical professionals teaching. They enjoyed bringing their knowledge to the mat, and they knew how to help a student.

The guy I saw injure the most people was a business major in college and had an understanding of technique and anatomy that amounted to, "go through the pain until it feels good." No matter how much a particular movement caused pain, he did not allow students to adapt the practice. Combined with encouraging alcohol use and sleep deprivation for "special practices" and it was a bad idea.

Listen to your body and use your own good sense.

Good luck at the new club John

Hi and thanks everyone else.

We can't all be expected to get on great, with everyone else all of the time.

We have to try our best.

robin_jet_alt
01-15-2017, 05:51 PM
A 2-1 is an upper second class honours degree from a UK university. There are several honour levels: first class honours; second class honours division one; second class honours division two; third class honours; pass (no honours at all); fail.

So I think John 2054 deserves some congratulations on a good achievement, which I thinks marks a new phase in his life.

Best wishes,

Thanks Peter, and well done John!

As for paid work, it's something that I've been struggling with for a while. I ended up starting my own business because nobody would employ me, and now I have a bunch of different seasonal and casual jobs in addition to my own business. It would be great to have a single reliable source of income. It's not easy.I hope it works out for you.

john2054
01-29-2017, 04:39 PM
Thanks Peter, and well done John!

As for paid work, it's something that I've been struggling with for a while. I ended up starting my own business because nobody would employ me, and now I have a bunch of different seasonal and casual jobs in addition to my own business. It would be great to have a single reliable source of income. It's not easy.I hope it works out for you.

Thanks Robin. My wife is my main source of income at the moment, so i have to try harder not to lose her!>><>