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Cyrijl
08-30-2002, 01:04 PM
What i have run into in my adventures in aikido is the phenomenon that many people think aikido is perfect...

To this end, when someone has a question regarding a technique, the reponse amost invariably seems to be "It is not the technique which is flawed but it is you." (see sweaty wrists thread)

Did O Senei stop training? Did he stop inventing? If O Senei still trained and evolved up until the point of his departure, then aikido cannot be perfect..and there is room for change and questioning.

So before all of the blind followers who crack the whip at the mere thought of change or improvement, just think....O Sensei trained all his life up until his death for a reason...not because aikido was perfect, but because it wasn't

Veers
08-30-2002, 02:00 PM
We cannot achieve perfection. We can get better, a lot better, yeah, but not perfect.

Bruce Baker
08-30-2002, 02:15 PM
Perfection: the achievement of set goals within your expectations.

Perfection of Aikido: looking at an attacker ... and they throw themselves.

Perfection in life: to find a no flaws in where you are at the moment, and savor it.

Beyond perfection: Oops, I forgot to add one little thing to perfection!

DGLinden
08-30-2002, 06:44 PM
I remember my friend and teacher Ed Baker, Shihan, often telling us that we had 'perfected our technique ' enough for one class.

I remember him saying that each technique was "perfectly the way it was" each time we executed it.

I remember him telling us to do each movement perfectly the way we do it, each time. There is no such thing as perfection.

Each time we move and think and act and create and execute we do it perfectly in that moment. Think of perfection as an adverb.

DaveO
08-30-2002, 10:32 PM
I look at the concept of 'perfection' as an absolute standard, impossible to achieve. No matter how good a skill is performed, there is always room for improvement. (This is POV only.) Thus, perfection is a goal to be striven for, not reached.

:)

Dave

Kevin Leavitt
08-30-2002, 10:40 PM
agree Dave. In that line Aikido, peace, and harmony are all ideals that may be seen as impossible to perfect, but that does not mean we should not try to get closer, or give up trying.

We all know we will die someday, so does that mean we should stop living today?

guest1234
08-30-2002, 10:54 PM
While no one is perfect, I think the measure of a man is how he strives for perfection, and the effort he puts into helping others toward that goal.

SeiserL
08-31-2002, 03:21 PM
In program we say, its progress not perfection that matters.

Until again,

Lynn

fabion
09-01-2002, 08:00 AM
as already said, perfection is something we should strive for, but we'll never achieve. the moment we stop and say "the technique is good enough", or "it's perfect", we'll stop improving it and stop growing. doesnt matter for how long one trains, there is always room for improvement.

Ghost Fox
09-04-2002, 08:16 AM
Nothing that has form is perfect. Only the formless dynamicism of life is perfect as are those who tie their ki with the Great Ki of the Universe. That which has form cannot be perfect.

tedehara
09-04-2002, 11:25 AM
What i have run into in my adventures in aikido is the phenomenon that many people think aikido is perfect...
....O Sensei trained all his life up until his death for a reason...not because aikido was perfect, but because it wasn't
In the Ki Society, there are continual changes made in techniques. All of these changes in technique are transmitted from KNK (the main dojo in Japan) to the various dojos through annual instructors' meetings and by regional chief instructors.

One of Koichi Tohei's goals was to standardize techniques. To accomplish this, a centralized organization was set-up to investigate techniques and instruct the various dojos.

Sometimes, there are big changes made. Most of the time, there are small changes made in technique. However, the sum of small changes on one technique can radically change it over the years.

Many of these technique changes aren't due to any martial flaws, but to enable a fuller expression of motion and to work in accord with the four basic principles (http://unofficial.ki-society.org/Four.html).

This type of study into aikido keeps everybody busy. You can't rest on your laurels after learning a technique, because that technique could change from year-to-year.