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chris87
10-24-2015, 09:04 AM
Ive watched steven seagals aikido when he was in japan and i must say its quite impressive i know he was or is affiliated with the aikikai but his aikido seems different and unique you dont see that sort of training often did he change what he was taught to his own style?
Thanks
Chris

mathewjgano
10-24-2015, 09:45 PM
Not sure...and you may have checked this out already, but just in case, here's his basic history (per Wikipedia):
At the age of 13, Seagal lied about his age and got a job as a dishwasher at a restaurant named The Wagon Wheel.[citation needed] One of the cooks at the restaurant was a Japanese shotokan karate expert and noticed Seagal moved very quickly around the kitchen. He taught Seagal the basics of karate. Seagal began training in aikido under master Harry Kiyoshi Ishisaka, founder of the Orange County Aikido School (Orange County Aiki Kai) (OCAK) in 1964. Seagal considers him to have been the most important martial arts teacher in his life. Seagal moved to Japan at some point between the ages of 19 and 21 with his father who was visiting for military purposes, and met karate masters and decided to remain in Japan. He received his 1st dan degree (Shodan) under the direction of Koichi Tohei. He continued to train in aikido as a student of Seiseki Abe, Tohei (whose aikido organization, Ki Society, Seagal refused to join in favor of staying with the Aikikai), Kisaburo Osawa, Hiroshi Isoyama and the second doshu Kisshomaru Ueshiba. He attained a 7th dan degree and Shihan in aikido and became the first foreigner to operate an aikido dojo in Japan.[17]

After returning to California in 1974, Seagal met Miyako Fujitani, an aikido instructor teaching in Los Angeles. He returned with her to her native Japan in 1975 where they married. When Seagal's father-in-law, also an aikido instructor, retired, Seagal became the new head of the organization known as Tenshin Aikido in Jūsō, Osaka City (affiliated with the Aikikai). Seagal is known by his students as Take Sensei. When Seagal left his dojo in Osaka, his then-wife Miyako became the caretaker of the dojo which has continued to the present day. Seagal initially returned to Taos, New Mexico, with his student (and later film stuntman) Craig Dunn, where they opened a dojo, although Seagal spent much of his time pursuing other ventures. After another period in Japan, Seagal returned to the U.S. in 1983 with senior student Haruo Matsuoka. They opened an aikido dojo, initially in North Hollywood, California, but later moved it to the city of West Hollywood. Seagal left Matsuoka in charge of the dojo, which he ran until the two parted ways in 1997.

What would you say are the unique differences? He certainly seems to be on the "harder" side of the spectrum, but I haven't noticed anything that seems especially unique or otherwise changed.

mathewjgano
10-24-2015, 10:11 PM
My sense of Seagal's Aikido is that it is largely like a lot of other Aikido...maybe not most, but I couldn't say.
1990:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3J7yzovaBAs
1993:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=herSynqVN3M
1996:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zl9o5wsswyk
Not sure when:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fH6HtkySiCQ

ryback
10-25-2015, 12:20 AM
Ive watched steven seagals aikido when he was in japan and i must say its quite impressive i know he was or is affiliated with the aikikai but his aikido seems different and unique you dont see that sort of training often did he change what he was taught to his own style?
Thanks
Chris
The techniques are of course the same, yet executed with a realistic attack in mind in a real self defense situation. That's why his main difference is the way he deflects the quick punches or kicks in order to be able to do a technique.

In my opinion most aikidoists suffer exactly the lack of that aspect. It's not that their technique doesn't work it is just that they can't get to the point of applying a technique if the attacker is using fast, real not over-committed attacks.

So, in my eyes, it is obvious that he developed some of those deflections himself, but if you take a closer look it is all there hidden inside...bokken and jo practice adapted for use against punches, kicks, knife attacks e.t.c.
All of that, followed or combined by fast, explosive execution of techniques is what creates his unique style.

The main thing to me is that even though he contributed greatly, technically and in spreading aikido through his movies, he never claimed to have created his own "style" of aikido, never called it "tenshin" or "Seagal" ryu or anything, always maintaining that there are no styles, there is only one aikido.

The differences that we spot on Seagal Sensei and his students are simply his personal approach to the art he does not claim or recognize that he created another "style" of aikido. Very honest and respectable, in my opinion...

chris87
10-25-2015, 04:53 AM
The techniques are of course the same, yet executed with a realistic attack in mind in a real self defense situation. That's why his main difference is the way he deflects the quick punches or kicks in order to be able to do a technique.

In my opinion most aikidoists suffer exactly the lack of that aspect. It's not that their technique doesn't work it is just that they can't get to the point of applying a technique if the attacker is using fast, real not over-committed attacks.

So, in my eyes, it is obvious that he developed some of those deflections himself, but if you take a closer look it is all there hidden inside...bokken and jo practice adapted for use against punches, kicks, knife attacks e.t.c.
All of that, followed or combined by fast, explosive execution of techniques is what creates his unique style.

The main thing to me is that even though he contributed greatly, technically and in spreading aikido through his movies, he never claimed to have created his own "style" of aikido, never called it "tenshin" or "Seagal" ryu or anything, always maintaining that there are no styles, there is only one aikido.

The differences that we spot on Seagal Sensei and his students are simply his personal approach to the art he does not claim or recognize that he created another "style" of aikido. Very honest and respectable, in my opinion...

Thats helped me alot thank you for that think i will strive for the same idea once im more experinced ive done shotokan karate for 17 years and i think i will adapt my aikido into deflecting punches and kicks ect....when i do actually get to that point

Derek
10-26-2015, 10:15 AM
He does have a few schools under his direction in the US. Check out Three Rivers Aikido in St. Louis on the Web.

bkedelen
10-26-2015, 11:15 AM
I think Segal's Aikido style is "retired".

tenshinaikidoka
10-27-2015, 05:01 PM
The only one who is directly affiliated with Seagal is Elliot Freeman which is the Three Rivers Dojo located in Missouri like had been suggested above. No one else, to my knowledge, is currently affiliated with him, just branched off and done their own thing now.

Tim Ruijs
10-30-2015, 08:16 AM
I really do not think Steven has developed a new style. Every Aikidoka (eventually) defines his own style.
His form is definitely more expressive, but that is not unique. Every practisioner has favourite techniques, or signature moves if you will.
Still Aikikai...rather mainstream (which is not meant as value judgement!).
He made great name for Aikido, which is certainly very valuable for the art :D

Cromwell
11-15-2015, 04:22 AM
Yes Sensei Seagal has developed his own style. Very practical and perhaps I would less style more technique. You can see the Aikikai roots however, the application is very different.

MrIggy
01-19-2016, 07:41 AM
It's just Aikido, with the same techniques. The only difference is in the "commitment" he shows in his techniques which seems to be more realistic. That's it.

Greg Jennings
01-20-2016, 08:23 AM
You might look into Hiroshi Isoyama Sensei's aikido.

aiki_marcos
05-29-2016, 07:35 PM
I see Hiroshi Isoyama teaches regularly in California.

http://www.isoyamaaikido.com/ourdojo.html

rugwithlegs
05-29-2016, 08:18 PM
Different schools had different basics. Tomiki was unusually tall, and his aikido has shomen ate as a basic along with a dozen variations on it. Less focus on Shihonage and koshinage than I learned. Seagal is listed as 6'4" on line. Morihei Ueshiba reported failed his initial military physical for being too short.

I had a 6'8" student. No problem with Iriminage, lots of discomfort with Shihonage and aikiotoshi. I think Seagal answered to his body type, same as the second Doshu.