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DaveO
08-26-2002, 03:46 PM
Here's a question I'd love to see answers to...
While many here follow Aikido strictly for its philosophy/lifestyle, but I'd say the majority of us study it as a self-defence/fighting art. So my question is about fighting itself: What skill or ability, in your personal opinion, makes the difference between a good fighter and a great fighter? Or a good fighter from a poor fighter?
Simply for the sake of argument, let's ignore Experience and Training; they're axiomatic.
My own answer would be the ability to maintain internal calm - if you keep a rational, clear head, you can apply whatever you've learned in an intelligent manner, thus controlling the confrontation.
Dave

MaylandL
08-26-2002, 08:59 PM
...What skill or ability, in your personal opinion, makes the difference between a good fighter and a great fighter? Or a good fighter from a poor fighter?

..My own answer would be the ability to maintain internal calm - if you keep a rational, clear head, you can apply whatever you've learned in an intelligent manner, thus controlling the confrontation.

...
Hello Dave

Just a few thoughts from doing a litlle research into self defence from websites with people the likes of Messrs Marc macYoung, Sammy Franco and Peyton Quinn. These comments are predicated by failure in avoidance and deescalation strategies that are an important part of self defence and that other strategies such as escape/evasion, compliance with requests are unlikely to avoid being harmed or injured.

Maintaining inner calm is desirable (and probably important) but I not sure that it is fully acheivable. One aspect but I would add that its the ability to harness and control the adrenalin rush that happens when you have to fight and controlling or perhaps using the physical symptoms and signs (increase heart rate, tunnel vision, loss of fine motor control etc) in a high stress and potentially life threatening situation to your benefit. Having been jumped a couple of times I can certainly vouch for these reactions. According to those in the know (Marc MacYoung, Peyton Quinn, Sammy Franco et al) these are likely more important than techniques.

From a technique perspective simple, direct and quick techniques that rely on gross motor movements that are designed to take a person out quickly and effectively so as to render them incapable of harming you. As the commentators above note, fighting is very messy.

Lastly a damn good knowledge of what you are legally able to do to defend yourself. What actions constitute self defence vs use of excessive force/assault/battery/manslaughter/grevious bodily harm/murder. Its not beyond the realms of possibility that the attacker/agreesor may also bring civil claims in court for use of excessive force etc.

All the best and happy training :)

jk
08-26-2002, 10:04 PM
Not to be too flippant, but in terms of physical attributes, good quads and decent 40-yard dash timings never hurt...that's about as gross as you can get in terms of motor movement.

Regards,

Abasan
08-26-2002, 10:38 PM
Good fighter and Great Fighter?

Instinct.

Ben_t_shodan
08-26-2002, 11:16 PM
What skill or ability, in your personal opinion, makes the difference between a good fighter and a great fighter? Or a good fighter from a poor fighter?

Dave
I think that the best is the ability to not want to fight or the ability to not have one.

If you can talk your way out, that was a good fight, true victory is victory over ones self.

Your Uke

Ben

P.S. the ability to have a small ego helps

MaylandL
08-27-2002, 02:58 AM
Not to be too flippant, but in terms of physical attributes, good quads and decent 40-yard dash timings never hurt...that's about as gross as you can get in terms of motor movement.

...
The 40 yard dash is denfinitely my favourite. Hmmm, I think that my motor movements get a great deal more gross with way too much beer ;)

Happy training

paw
08-27-2002, 05:56 AM
Heart -- the will to "win" exceeding the will to survive.

Regards,

Paul

DaveO
08-27-2002, 09:26 AM
Good answers, all - just what I was looking for. I was going to question Abasan's answer of 'instinct', using myself as an example - I certainly have the will, the 'grunt' (as we say) when fighting, and seem to have an instinctive knack for dominating an opponent, but instinct? I was one wimpy kid; a real hide-behind-Mom's-coattails type of kid. I joined the Army to learn how to deal with my fears. But I started thinking: I remember when I was 6 and fell off the slide in the playground (12 feet high - we were sliding down the support pole and I missed.) I didn't run screaming to Mommy, I got up, dusted off and climbed the ladder again. A bit later, 10 or so, when I had to deal with bullies, I remember being terribly frightened and a lot smaller than them, but standing my ground while they pushed me around. When playing Red Rover, I always broke through, since I didn't stop running when I ran into their arms. In hindsight, I think maybe Abasan is right; 'Instinct to fight' may not be the right term, but an innate desire to win, coupled to a refusal to quit is how I interpreted his answer.

Thanx!

Dave

SeiserL
08-28-2002, 09:35 AM
IMHO, the willing to survive (or win) at any cost is the most important fighting skills. Follow that with threat awareness from sublte cues earlier is extremely useful.

Until again,

Lynn

Bruce Baker
08-30-2002, 02:46 PM
Knowing how to avoid a fight.

Knowing what is needed to end a fight.

Learning from not only your mistakes but the mistakes of others.

And, yes, having the heart to see through to the end your convictions, the heart of a warrior, the mind of an educated person, the words of a diplomat.

Impossible, maybe. But to try? That is the heart of great fighter.

Kevin Leavitt
08-30-2002, 10:33 PM
The basic princples of combat:

speed, iniative, flexibility, audacity, economy of force, agility, experience...you know all that stuff you learned in the military.

Also being able to fight without regard for living or dying. If you are fighting thinking about this, then you are not prepared to win. (Just what Lynn said).

I know I tend to talk alot about peace, harmony and philosophy alot, but I also wish that people practiced aikido in the dojo as if their lives depended on it more. If we did that and really trained hard and without ego, then we would all get better faster!

I have a teacher I have trained with a couple of times know...everytime I train with him, I have to stop cause we train so hard I would pass out if I kept going. Basically non-stop for 2 hours...I love it! I wish I could train like that all the time!

Brian H
09-01-2002, 01:40 PM
Breathing

Breathing - before, during and after