PDA

View Full Version : The Armigeri defensores seniores


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


dps
05-21-2015, 05:55 PM
The earliest use of the symbol that now represents yin yang.

http://lukeuedasarson.com/NDarmigeriDefensoresSeniores.html

dps

kewms
05-21-2015, 06:47 PM
Probably not. The concept appears in the I Ching, which is a thousand years older. This may be the first known representation that looks like a modern yin yang, but that doesn't mean the Romans had even remotely similar associations with it.

Katherine

dps
05-21-2015, 08:02 PM
Probably not. The concept appears in the I Ching, which is a thousand years older. This may be the first known representation that looks like a modern yin yang, but that doesn't mean the Romans had even remotely similar associations with it.

Katherine

The first Chinese ying yang symbol that looks like the modern one was created 1351-1395 CE.
There early symbols representing the Chinese philosophy that were not the same as the modern symbol.

(http://www.iep.utm.edu/yinyang/
Yinyang (Yin-yang) | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

These three trends eventually led to the creation of the first yinyang symbol by Zhao Huiqian 1351-1395 CE (AD)

The Roman Infantry used theirs in 430 AD which they probably got it from the Celts when they invaded Britain between 40 AD and 60 Ad.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taijitu)

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_conquest_of_Britain Roman conquest of Britain).

dps

kewms
05-21-2015, 10:13 PM
Yes, I read those links, too.

My point was that the Romans, and the Celts before them, may have independently invented teardrop swirls, but didn't connect them to the much older taijitu concept.

Katherine

dps
05-21-2015, 10:16 PM
Yes, I read those links, too.

My point was that the Romans, and the Celts before them, may have independently invented teardrop swirls, but didn't connect them to the much older taijitu concept.

Katherine

I wasn't posting about concepts, just the symbol.

dps

dps
05-21-2015, 10:23 PM
Of course with trade routes like the Silk Road and lesser trade routes, concepts and symbols could possibly be transferred from one culture to another.

dps

Carsten Möllering
05-22-2015, 01:40 AM
There are forms of the triskele in which the end of the spirals "swing back" and form a "taiji symbol". Veeeeeery old. ;-)

When we where children we used to let our pen just "flow" and we often got a "taiji symbol". Veeeeery unspectacular. ;-)

As far as I know there are some elder symbols to be found in Chinese monasteries that are more "dynamic" and lack the black/white dots comparde to the "modern" taiji symbol, but have the same spiral structure.