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Peter Boylan
02-19-2015, 09:16 AM
We approach budo training and practice very differently when we are younger than when we are more mature (nice euphemism). How we do things and what we are seeking changes a lot. In this blog post I wrote about training in Judo, but I find it applies to all budo I've seen, including Aikido.

http://budobum.blogspot.com/2015/02/young-guy-judo-vs-old-fellow-judo.html

What do you think?

sakumeikan
02-19-2015, 01:06 PM
[QUOTE=Peter Boylan;342460]We approach budo training and practice very differently when we are younger than when we are more mature (nice euphemism). How we do things and what we are seeking changes a lot. In this blog post I wrote about training in Judo, but I find it applies to all budo I've seen, including Aikido.

ht:/dobum.blogspot.com/2015/02/young-guy-judo-vs-old-fellow-judo.html
Hi Peter ,
Totally agree with your viewpoints.Good article. Should be mandatory reading for all, Cheers, Joe.

Janet Rosen
02-19-2015, 02:19 PM
It's interesting to compare effects of age vs effects of experience, neh?

Peter Boylan
02-19-2015, 03:30 PM
Thank you Joe!

Janet, the more experience you have the easier it is to age, and the more you age the more motivated you are to develop those more efficient skills. There might be some chicken and egg question going on there.

RonRagusa
02-19-2015, 07:44 PM
We approach budo training and practice very differently when we are younger than when we are more mature (nice euphemism). How we do things and what we are seeking changes a lot. In this blog post I wrote about training in Judo, but I find it applies to all budo I've seen, including Aikido.

http://budobum.blogspot.com/2015/02/young-guy-judo-vs-old-fellow-judo.html

What do you think?

Nice post Peter. Reminds me of how my Aikido training has progressed throughout the years. At 67, my "huff, puff and blow your house down" method of training has long since given way to a subtler form of practice that I find more suits me.

Regarding your description of Old Guy Judo, we have an exercise where students pair up and each takes the role of uke and nage simultaneously in order to find a throw. Younger or less experienced students when paired together usually end up in a wrestling match while older or more experienced students tend to "work the edges" of the interaction in order to take advantage of their partner over committing or otherwise presenting an opening to exploit.

Ron

Peter Boylan
02-20-2015, 08:03 AM
Regarding your description of Old Guy Judo, we have an exercise where students pair up and each takes the role of uke and nage simultaneously in order to find a throw. Younger or less experienced students when paired together usually end up in a wrestling match while older or more experienced students tend to "work the edges" of the interaction in order to take advantage of their partner over committing or otherwise presenting an opening to exploit.

Ron

Ron, thank you. I've noticed this in Aikido dojo a lot. As people develop sensitivity they begin to learn how to find those openings when they, as you say, "work the edges." I think it's much more interesting too. Huff and puff budo stopped interesting me a long time ago. How much I can accomplish with the smallest input possible is what I find fascinating.

JP3
02-22-2015, 05:15 PM
That's an excellent article, Peter.

I like to say you hear young guys grunt when they randori, but often you can hear the older guys having conversation and laughing. Completely different level of physical intensity of muscular effort involved.

Granted, probably a lot more mental effort going on with the older guys, but that just stands to reason.

carpeviam
03-19-2015, 10:13 AM
We've recently started sword sparring at my dojo with padded swords. I've noticed that almost every time I aggressively go in for an attack, I get hit. When I wait on the defense for an opportunity to arise, I'm much more successful. Of course, this means that a 3-point match (where every strike = 1 pt) can last for a very long time, with me and my partner circling, swords touching lightly, not too much pressure. But it's certainly fun.