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gcsr
09-02-2014, 09:39 AM
Question: Do any of you train in other martial arts in unison with your current style. If so does your dojo and its members know? And if so what is thier reaction? do they frown upon it or do they like that you train in another martial art.

Malicat
09-02-2014, 10:19 AM
Question: Do any of you train in other martial arts in unison with your current style. If so does your dojo and its members know? And if so what is thier reaction? do they frown upon it or do they like that you train in another martial art.

I just moved dojos, so I don't train any other arts currently, but previously I did train Hakutsuru Karate. And yeah, since my dojo cho also taught the Hakutsuru classes, they all definitely knew about it. :) We have quite a few dojos in the organization that teach other forms of martial arts, I know of 2 Hakutsuru/Aikido dojos, 2 that do Arnis as well as Aikido, and 1 that also includes Tae Kwon Do classes. What they teach depends on the dojo cho's preference though. Additionally, the organizational rules require one year of solid training in one or the other martial art before cross training both to avoid confusion and other possible issues.

--Ashley

PeterR
09-02-2014, 10:54 AM
Not currently - but when I did it was actively encouraged. Go out young man and get thee a judo shodan. On the same tack anyone who came in for a little extra aikido training to supplement what they were doing were welcomed with open arms. I figure you can't have it both ways.

Brian Gillaspie
09-02-2014, 11:54 AM
I used to train in other arts at the same time but I have less time for training now so I'm mainly just studying aikido. I think it is a good thing to train other arts and I would actually be concerned if your dojo or classmates frowned upon it.

gcsr
09-03-2014, 10:41 AM
Love to here more opinions on this topic.

fatebass21
12-09-2014, 06:37 PM
I do not currently train in others but have considered it. My thought is that I should not do so until I have several more years of aikido training under my belt.

SeaGrass
12-10-2014, 02:58 AM
Chris

I used to train at Westminster Aikikai under Phong sensei, he gave me a solid foundation that's very beneficial in my current pursuit in koryu. Good ukemi goes a long way ;)

fatebass21
12-10-2014, 07:08 AM
Hi Bien,

Cool running into you here! :D

Phong Sensei's experience and his Dans in various arts are the reason I want Aikido to be my foundation for everything I study.

How long were you at Westminster? When did you leave? I originally left in 2006 and am back full time now. :circle: :square: :triangle:

Best,

Chris

fatebass21
12-10-2014, 07:18 AM
And, yes, they focus intently on ukemi from the get go. :)

SeaGrass
12-10-2014, 11:22 AM
Hi Chris, I trained there pretty regularly in all the adult night classes from 2004-2011. I taught kids class on the weekend there for a few years as well. You must have trained in the morning classes.

Eva Antonia
12-11-2014, 04:24 AM
Hi all,

I am training aikido and karate in parallel, and everyone is fine with it. Both one of my aikido teachers and my karate teacher also have background in differet martial arts (aikido teacher did karate, karate teacher got up to shodan in aikido); maybe it helps. Sometimes the aikido teacher gives a reference to a similar karate technique to me and another guy who also trains in both.

To me, the arts are complementary, and I get from the one what I don't get from the other.
Confusions occur, for example the reaction to block or get out of the way of an attack, or doing aikido falls on karate techniques. I'd say it doesn't happen too often.

Best regards,

Eva

fatebass21
12-11-2014, 07:11 AM
Hi Chris, I trained there pretty regularly in all the adult night classes from 2004-2011. I taught kids class on the weekend there for a few years as well. You must have trained in the morning classes.

Hmmm, I was there from about 2004-2006 and caught an evening class every so often. I am sure we bumped into eachother here and there.

All the best!

:D

Adam Huss
12-11-2014, 08:40 AM
We have a few martial arts taught at our dojo. Training with other groups is highly encouraged, and you will often be asked to teach something you learned after training somewhere outside our organization. We have groups of guys attend seminars that find there way near us. We try to go train with Dan Inosanto on his annual seminar nearby. Our aikido HQ dojo hosts an annual summer seminar that is open and teachers from all different kinds of styles teach 30 minute sessions all weekend long. That's always a fun time, whether its BJJ and aikido people doing stand-up sparring, or kumite while doing aikido techniques, judo and karate guys doing aikido, etc. This also involves heavy socialization afterwards, which opens doors and paths to relationships outside of your native organization or martial art style.

Fred Little
12-11-2014, 02:09 PM
After many years of training, and a number of those years training in more than one art concurrently, I now conclude that in a number of those periods, I might have done better if I had supplemented my core martial arts practice with a basic non-martial arts routine that worked the four specific areas of aerobic and anaerobic fitness, core strength, and flexibility.

Of course, I would recommend that to anyone, whether they practice martial arts or not.

If training in two martial arts, if you can't be transparent with both instructors (and there may be legit reasons for this), then you best be very discreet.

Hope this helps.

FL

fatebass21
12-14-2014, 02:10 PM
supplemented my core martial arts practice with a basic non-martial arts routine that worked the four specific areas of aerobic and anaerobic fitness, core strength, and flexibility.


Always a good idea in any discipline.

SeaGrass
12-14-2014, 10:18 PM
Sleeping after a meal is my lateral training Fred! :D

PeterR
12-15-2014, 03:07 AM
Sleeping after a meal is my lateral training Fred! :D

Ah yes - the old Sumo training regime.

jurasketu
12-15-2014, 07:55 AM
Non-martial flexibility, endurance and strength training has long been part of "training" since ancient times.

It should be a routine part of any martial artist training regimen. Or rather anyone's life. But please keep it sensible and avoid stupid overuse injuries. There is nothing to prove to anyone - just be healthy. I really don't care how many miles someone can run or how much weight they can life or how many situps they can do.

I personally strongly recommend High Intensity Interval training for fitness - also good for martial situations...

Robin

fatebass21
12-15-2014, 08:32 AM
:) Good point Robin,

HIIT workouts focus on those short twitch muscle fibers that we rely on when reacting to an attacker quickly.