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ChrisMikk
08-21-2014, 07:02 PM
I don't know if this would surprise anyone, but in today's Friday morning aiki-ken class (actually, just about 45 minutes ago), Jacques Payet was talking about why we study ken and the difference between the skill of cutting someone with a kenjutsu technique and how we should be training in aiki-ken class, and he said (and this is a direct quotation): "Aikido is not mechanic, it's internal." (Of course, we normally say "mechanical" but he's French so it sounded like "mécanique".) Here's a permanent link: Twitter.com/KyotoKenshu/status/502603433632104448 (http://twitter.com/KyotoKenshu/status/502603433632104448). I can't imagine there are too many other Yoshinkan instructors who would talk like this.

Adam Huss
08-21-2014, 11:04 PM
I don't know if this would surprise anyone, but in today's Friday morning aiki-ken class (actually, just about 45 minutes ago), Jacques Payet was talking about why we study ken and the difference between the skill of cutting someone with a kenjutsu technique and how we should be training in aiki-ken class, and he said (and this is a direct quotation): "Aikido is not mechanic, it's internal." (Of course, we normally say "mechanical" but he's French so it sounded like "mécanique".) Here's a permanent link: Twitter.com/KyotoKenshu/status/502603433632104448 (http://twitter.com/KyotoKenshu/status/502603433632104448). I can't imagine there are too many other Yoshinkan instructors who would talk like this.

Its really just semantics and wordage. You can label it whatever you want, but the point is harmonizing the entirety of the body to increase efficiency of movement. Which vernacular is best used largely depends on the audience, if your goal is to communicate in a way best suited to that audience's understanding.

PeterR
08-22-2014, 01:27 AM
Its really just semantics and wordage. You can label it whatever you want, but the point is harmonizing the entirety of the body to increase efficiency of movement. Which vernacular is best used largely depends on the audience, if your goal is to communicate in a way best suited to that audience's understanding.
Isn't that what good kenjutsu technique does?