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dapidmini88
07-14-2014, 10:00 PM
some of my senseis (I've been training in several different dojos because I moved to another region for college) used to tell me to add atemi when receiving an attack with the other hand. but some uke just let their non-attacking hand dangle limply in the air when doing yokomen-uchi or when an atemi comes at their face:straightf , while the others blocks the atemi when it get close enough to their face/body. after I try both, it seems that by letting an atemi comes freely without being blocked, the kuzushi will happen well but it looks fake (no one in their right mind will let the enemy's attack go in so easily:uch: ). but if I block the atemi, sometimes the kuzushi will not be perfect or not happen at all.:rolleyes:

what do you think is the best method to train?

kewms
07-15-2014, 02:22 AM
Short answer: Ask your teacher.

Long answer:

If aikido is going to be a "real" martial art, then it needs to be able to handle "real" attacks. Which, at a minimum, should mean that uke is not required to be an idiot. So instruction should consider uke's role, how to attack effectively, what the attack is trying to accomplish, and so forth. At higher levels, it should include reversals and counter-reversals. Uke shouldn't allow himself to get hit, and nage should know what to do if an atemi is blocked.

On the other hand, if you ask a brand new beginner to learn all of that at once you're likely to get nothing but confusion. Rather, a student's ukemi skills should progress in parallel with his nage-waza, and should present a degree of difficulty appropriate to nage's level.

Different dojos address these issues in different ways: ask your teacher.

Katherine

Cliff Judge
07-16-2014, 09:32 AM
Honestly, I have found that if you open the space up as the yokomenuchi is coming in, you can take control of the attacking hand with both of your hands and be safe from uke's other limbs - if you get their balance as soon as you touch them.

Adam Huss
07-16-2014, 11:22 AM
some of my senseis (I've been training in several different dojos because I moved to another region for college) used to tell me to add atemi when receiving an attack with the other hand. but some uke just let their non-attacking hand dangle limply in the air when doing yokomen-uchi or when an atemi comes at their face:straightf , while the others blocks the atemi when it get close enough to their face/body. after I try both, it seems that by letting an atemi comes freely without being blocked, the kuzushi will happen well but it looks fake (no one in their right mind will let the enemy's attack go in so easily:uch: ). but if I block the atemi, sometimes the kuzushi will not be perfect or not happen at all.:rolleyes:

what do you think is the best method to train?

That's a bad habit in many aikido dojo. I would ask my teacher to spend some time working on strikes. Hopefully s/he or they know how to strike properly (I've seen many black instructors who can not, unfortunately). Ask to hit some pads or a bag (or even B.O.B if he's at one of your dojo!). Many basic Japanese strikes have a pulling motion with the not attacking arm....this is key practice for developing momentum, and focused technique. I do that when doing kihon waza, or I'll keep my non-attacking hand near my midsection so I can more easily block any atemi when doing free practice (or if whatever we are practicing has atemi).

jonreading
07-16-2014, 11:33 AM
I think "ask your teacher" is sage advice.

Sometimes, we'll show atemi as an effort to solicit nage to use the entirety of her body.
Sometimes, we'll show atemi as an effort to teach uke about valid martial space.
Sometimes, we'll show atemi as an effort to teach fighting application.

Atemi waza is designed to maximize successful strikes. The idea is precision striking that is indefensible (if done properly). This can translate into either a strike that lands or a strike that solicits a specific, desired, response.

For an exercise like yokomenuchi, uchi mawari (inside turning exercise from a yokomenuchi attack), you should focus on kuzushi originating from balance, not striking. We're not asking our partner to be stupid, we're asking our partner to help us learn movement.