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REK
08-15-2002, 06:51 AM
There's an old saw that says something like:

"It's better to spend ten years seeking a good teacher than ten years training with a bad one"

There are so many posters on this site who proffer their undying love and dedication to this art that I wonder if any have taken the second of those choices just so they had a place to train. I know I did. Anyone?

memyselfandi
08-15-2002, 07:09 AM
Um...this thread might serve best in the Anonymous section ;) . I'm not sure how many would appreciate the unaccountable increase in the number times they're "accidentally" thrown into walls or out the door when training with their Sensei's :freaky: :p

erikmenzel
08-15-2002, 07:34 AM
the unaccountable increase in the number times they're "accidentally" thrown into walls or out the door when training with their Sensei's
:eek: It is supposed to be accidentally?? :eek:

I guess that means we always have been doing it wrongly at our club. :D :D

SeiserL
08-15-2002, 09:57 AM
I have never settled for a place to train, I can do that on my own. I was fortunate to, after searching, find a great Sensei.

Until again,

Lynn

Jim ashby
08-15-2002, 10:17 AM
I was lucky first time. I found a brilliant Dojo with a fantastic set of instuctors presided over by a talented, charismatic and inspirational Sensei. The students are a fine bunch which reflects on the quality of the teachers.

Sounds a bit messianic but that's how I feel.

Have fun.

Young-In Park
08-15-2002, 10:36 AM
When I decided to start Aikido, I looked in the dojo directory in an issue of Aikido Today Magazine. I decided to visit the dojo that was closest to my house.

Since I was a beginner, I didn't know any better. Now I realize that the Aikido Gods must have been smiling upon me because I was lucky enough to walk into a dojo with a variety of instructors led by a GREAT chief instructor, Henry Oshiro.

YoungIn Park

Orange County Aiki Kai

Santa Ana, CA

SeiserL
08-15-2002, 10:52 PM
Now I realize that the Aikido Gods must have been smiling upon me because I was lucky enough to walk into a dojo with a variety of instructors led by a GREAT chief instructor, Henry Oshiro. YoungIn Park Orange County Aiki Kai Santa Ana, CA
Yes, they were smiling. An excellent school. Well known and respected.

I study with Sensei Phong of Tenshinkai Aikido (Aikikai) in Westminster.

It is nice when convenience and true expertise come together and we don't have to choose or compromise.

From our school to yours, a warm greeting to our neighbor.

Until again,

Lynn

MaylandL
08-15-2002, 11:39 PM
The same gods must have been smiling on me too. I train at two dojos.

The chief instructor at one of the dojos was taught by Hayden Foster Sensei while the Chief Instructor at the other dojo was instructed by Kobayashi Yasuo Sensei and Igarashi Kazuo Sensei.

Unfortunately, living so far away from the main centres of aikido, there isnt the same opportunities to attend seminars.

Jim ashby
08-16-2002, 02:03 AM
Hi Mayland. Hayden Foster teaches seminars fairly regularly at our Dojo and, of course, at the "Big Three" gathering in Lowestoft every year. If ever you're in the UK, please feel free to drop in to us, you'd be most welcome.

Have fun

MaylandL
08-16-2002, 02:16 AM
...Hayden Foster teaches seminars fairly regularly at our Dojo and, of course, at the "Big Three" gathering in Lowestoft every year. If ever you're in the UK, please feel free to drop in to us, you'd be most welcome.

...
Wow, thank you very much. That sounds wonderful. May I also extend the same invite if you are ever in Perth Western Australia. I'll help you become one with aussie beer and promise not to be too parochial when it comes to Aussie vs English cricket ;) .

I am suitably envious of you being able to attend seminars by the "Big Three". We have so few visiting senseis. My Sensei is going to the UK at the end of the year to formally invite Hayden Foster Sensei to Perth next year to conduct a seminar. I'm crossing my fingers, toes, gi, hakama and other appendages that he can make it.

In the meantime, happy training :)

Jason Tonks
08-16-2002, 03:13 AM
I was fortunate after wanting to train in Aikido for some time to see an advert for the Ellis School of Traditional Aikido. I immediately went down and joined upon liking what I saw. My two main teachers are Sensei Henry Ellis and Sensei Derek Eastman who were both direct pupils of the late master Sensei Kenshiro Abbe. Sensei Ellis's style of positive style of Aikido as taught to him by Kenshiro Abbe put paid to any doubts I may have had regarding effectiveness. Aikido definitely changes people for the better and I had tried other Martial Arts beforehand including Muay Thai and Karate.

All the best,

Jason T

Jim ashby
08-16-2002, 03:19 AM
Hi Mayland, I've already been to "God's own country" and become one with VB, a fine beer. I am lucky in that my Sensei -Tom Moss is one of the "big three". I trained with him last night. I came off the mat with the usual mantra "I ain't never gonna be that good". One of the perks of our Dojo, as I've mentioned before, is that it's in the grounds of a pub. Hope you can get here soon, or that I can come to Oz again.

Have fun.

Ben_t_shodan
08-16-2002, 10:46 PM
"It's better to spend ten years seeking a good teacher than ten years training with a bad one"
I believe that is true, but unfortunately their arenít many Aikido Dojo in some places. The quote you made is a very good one. I feel that Spending ten years with a bad teacher is better that spending 10 years with none. Every teacher has something to offer, that might not be what they are trying to teach but if you learn something it is worth it.

Thank you,

Ben Doubleday

Kevin Leavitt
08-18-2002, 05:23 PM
hmmm interesting thought.

is it better to train than to choose to not train at all?

I have had the fortune of having really good teachers. BTW, even a bad teacher can serve as a good example...of what NOT to do.

Obviously you make the best of a bad situation. You train with the best you can find where ever you are.

OR you can move to an place to train with someone good. It all depends on your values and priorities.

I certainly wouldn't waste my time training with someone I didn't believe in. If I wanted that, I'd train by myself.

I have seen people who are alway unsatisfied with their current situation. (Grass is always greener proverb). They float from dojo to dojo profession and complaining how no one is good enough to teach them. need to keep that in mind too!

Good luck!

Kat.C
08-18-2002, 09:17 PM
For me it would depend on how bad the teacher is and in what way. There is only one dojo close enough for me to get to and I decided before I had seen it that I was joining, unless the teacher was abusive or really sucked at aikido. Fortunately I have found a wonderful sensei.

Cyrijl
08-21-2002, 02:05 PM
I'm really happy for all of those people who found perfect match Dojo on their first tries. but i believe many probably did not understand enough to think ill of their Sensei. For me it wasn't the teacher, but the students and their inability to question...themselves...the art...or especially sensei (something which seems to permeate aikido)

I still train, just not at that dojo and not in Aikido...i hope to return when i find a school in which i can find others who share my understanding...till then i would rather just study with a great teacher in another art...

Don_Modesto
08-22-2002, 08:42 AM
"It's better to spend ten years seeking a good teacher than ten years training with a bad one"

There are so many posters on this site who proffer their undying love and dedication to this art that I wonder if any have taken the second of those choices just so they had a place to train. I know I did. Anyone?

"Um...this thread might serve best in the Anonymous section."
Disclaimer: I've never had to "settle" at any dojo I've stayed at.

However, I disagree with the premise that it's better to abstain than train. Nonsense.

As a beginner, it's doubly tough with a poor teacher. But unless the "teacher" talks too much (keeping students from training) you're at least in their plugging.

As an advanced practitioner, the teacher, per se becomes less relevant. You ought to have your own training agenda anyway (and I appreciate the teachers I've had who grant students latitude to improvise from the teacher's demonstrated techniques--Geez, we're always practicing technique...how do we practice TAKEMUSU AIKI?)

DGLinden
08-23-2002, 01:57 PM
I agree with Don, completely. Would also like to add that I've suffered through some terrible classes by untalented, arrogant fools who were more interested in stoking their own ego than in actually teaching anything, and I have never failed to learn something. The truth is in the training.

TheProdigy
08-23-2002, 03:52 PM
When I first went and looked at aikido for the first time, visiting a local dojo of the kokikai style the training didn't mean much to me. Having no prior background, I didn't really know what they were doing... all I saw was people getting thrown (or just falling) and getting back up. What brought me back was the instructor. My sensei had this presence that struck me. I didn't know what it was about him, but something was different. I left that 1st day, having only talked with him for a bit, with more respect for him than I had for just about if not everyone else in my life at that time. Ever since, I've been going back. From camps, I've come to realize, I happen to be attending one of the best taught schools.

I can't say from experience, but I've read another quote before also...

something to the effect: a bad student can only be taught by a good teacher, but a good student can learn from even a bad teacher.

I happen to like this quote. Though, a good teacher can go a long way for any type of student.