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akiy
04-03-2014, 09:43 AM
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Here's a "highlight" video of Ryuji Shirakawa (5th dan).

Born in 1980, Shirakawa started aikido at age 15 under his father Katsutoshi Shirakawa (7th dan) and became uchideshi to Yasuo Kobayashi (8th dan) in 2003. He was part of the Japanese delegation for the 2013 SportAccord World Combat Games in St Petersburg, Russia.

What are your thoughts on this video?

-- Jun

j0nharris
04-03-2014, 10:04 AM
:rolleyes: I could do without the soundtrack...

Adam Huss
04-03-2014, 11:18 AM
I've never liked budo videos with soundtracks...even worse when its native from the actual event. Or, I should say, I don't like the fact they have soundtracks....videos could be just fine.

TR: Looks like he's a big supporter of suwari komi/sudori.

TomAiki
04-03-2014, 06:08 PM
Jun thanks for this I enjoyed it. Very fluid, large circle aikido.

odudog
04-03-2014, 08:19 PM
The sound track is fine, but then again I'm a fan of the song.

PeterR
04-04-2014, 02:22 AM
I understand demonstration - but I felt uke was working just as hard as tori.

hughrbeyer
04-04-2014, 06:48 AM
Interesting that he's so in love with the kokyu where you go down on all fours and let uke fall over you (anybody got a name for that?). O-Sensei was fond of that technique too. It's instructive to compare the differences in how they do it.

SteveTrinkle
04-04-2014, 01:54 PM
very big and dramatic , like Tissier Sense and, i for what it's worth, I like to see some subtletytoo which I do not see here,so, not reallymy cup of tea

kfa4303
04-06-2014, 10:16 AM
I like it. Clear, concise movement. I agree it's a little "large", but then again he's kind of small and many of the uke appear to be bigger than he is, which can sometimes cause Nage to enlarge the movements to accommodate.

SteveTrinkle
04-06-2014, 01:48 PM
I have no problem with "large movement, I just like to see some subtltywhich does not necessarily mean smallYamaguchi Sensei is large, but exceedingly subtle just because his uke are bigger is not the problem from my point of view and again, this is only my own personal taste and I have never felt the guy, so it's incredibly stupid and arrogant of me to be commenting this way.

SteveTrinkle
04-06-2014, 02:52 PM
here's an old sempai of mine:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0R5bB4cVA4 a student of YamaguchiSensei and Takeda YoshinobuSensei again just For what it's worth

Adam Huss
04-06-2014, 04:33 PM
Interesting that he's so in love with the kokyu where you go down on all fours and let uke fall over you (anybody got a name for that?). O-Sensei was fond of that technique too. It's instructive to compare the differences in how they do it.

Hugh,

I was calling that a version of suwari komi or sudori....though the versions of sudori I learned were with one knee down, not both. Call it sudori ryo kata hiza tsuki?

Keith Larman
04-07-2014, 09:04 AM
I understand demonstration - but I felt uke was working just as hard as tori.

Yup.

As I sit here thinking about it -- no critique is really intended by that comment. And the following is really more about my own thinking -- so consider this thinking out loud about myself, my own perceptions, my own understandings, etc.

The demo is how a lot of demos go in many arts quite frankly. The issue of ukemi is always a bit of a sticky one and frankly I will run away screaming if the discussion goes that direction.

All that said, I realize that the demonstrations I'm usually most intrigued by are either the ones that are quite, um, well, have a sense of power and violence as well as the ones where it seems like almost nothing is happening but you watch uke collapse like a stack of plates that's been subtly shifted from down below. Of course both extremes are often BS demos ("huh, the guy really isn't broken or dead" or "Give me a freaking break!"), but sometimes not as there is a huge amount of skill, timing, trust and experience on display.

After all these years I see some degree of merit in both extremes with a lot less interest (personally) in the ones that have neither. Interesting... Must think more... :cool:

Keith Larman
04-07-2014, 09:09 AM
And maybe this should be another thread, but when I see demos where the time between the start and finish are too long, my BS klaxon gets progressively louder. It's probably due to time on the mat with folk doing BJJ, MMA, Kick boxers (ouch, damnit, stop kicking my shin!), etc. It's probably due to my profound lack of ability (which is always a valid question in comments like these), but I could never get those big flow-ey things to work on those guys. They have vastly too much experience to get caught in that kind of thing and recover in a blink, usually resulting in bruising ("I SAID QUIT KICKING MY DAMNED SHIN!!!!).

Probably me.

Carry on...

PeterR
04-07-2014, 10:58 AM
Yup.

As I sit here thinking about it -- no critique is really intended by that comment. And the following is really more about my own thinking -- so consider this thinking out loud about myself, my own perceptions, my own understandings, etc.

The demo is how a lot of demos go in many arts quite frankly. The issue of ukemi is always a bit of a sticky one and frankly I will run away screaming if the discussion goes that direction.

All that said, I realize that the demonstrations I'm usually most intrigued by are either the ones that are quite, um, well, have a sense of power and violence as well as the ones where it seems like almost nothing is happening but you watch uke collapse like a stack of plates that's been subtly shifted from down below. Of course both extremes are often BS demos ("huh, the guy really isn't broken or dead" or "Give me a freaking break!"), but sometimes not as there is a huge amount of skill, timing, trust and experience on display.

After all these years I see some degree of merit in both extremes with a lot less interest (personally) in the ones that have neither. Interesting... Must think more... :cool:

Yes that was my intention - indicating personal preference rather than an overt critique. Still when the audience gets the feeling that uke is throwing themselves one may need to re-evaluate what you are trying to show.

Keith Larman
04-07-2014, 11:12 AM
Yes that was my intention - indicating personal preference rather than an overt critique. Still when the audience gets the feeling that uke is throwing themselves one may need to re-evaluate what you are trying to show.

Agree completely.