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Riai Maori
02-08-2014, 02:31 PM
When discovering New Zealand in the late 1700, Captain Cook was met by a group of angry savages on the beach waving sticks. These sticks are called Taiha and those savages today are called Maori. Our Maori language has the same vowel sounds as the Japanese and pronunciation of words is the same in both languages. Our Maori men are renowned warriors from the past until the present. There are many Maori men in the Special Air Services (SAS), with the most recent decorated soldier (Maori) receiving the Victoria Cross ( purple heart equivalent).

Here is a you tube clip for reference.www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CNq4_RrUrg

Michael Hackett
02-08-2014, 04:35 PM
I thought the Victoria Cross was the highest award for heroism in the British system, similar to the American Medal of Honor. I don't know - I've only seen one on display at the Globe and Laurel in Quantico, Virginia.

Riai Maori
02-08-2014, 04:50 PM
I thought the Victoria Cross was the highest award for heroism in the British system, similar to the American Medal of Honor. I don't know - I've only seen one on display at the Globe and Laurel in Quantico, Virginia.

Yes correct, New Zealand along with Canada is one of many commonwealth countries, who recognize the British Queen as their monarch. Our New Zealand flag has the British Union Jack in its is left-hand top corner unlike Canada. The Maori flag you see under my location is not the official New Zealand flag. I am Maori and one of the many indigenous people of our land. "Thanks Aikiweb for acknowledging my people"

Riai Maori
02-08-2014, 05:18 PM
Lance-Corporal Bill (Willie) Henry Apiata, NZSAS

Willie Apiata

Date of action: May–September 2004 (Afghanistan)
Date of award: 2 July 2007

Bill (Willie) Apiata is the recipient to date of the Victoria Cross (VC) for New Zealand. Apiata was part of a New Zealand Special Air Service (NZSAS) Troop in Afghanistan in 2004 that was attacked by about 20 enemy fighters while camped for the night in a rural area. Rocket-propelled grenades destroyed one of the troop’s vehicles and immobilised another. Apiata was blown off the bonnet of the vehicle he had been sleeping on, while two other soldiers in or near the vehicle were wounded by shrapnel, one of them seriously. After finding cover and assessing the soldier’s injuries, Apiata carried him across 70 m of exposed ground to reach the troop’s main position. He then helped fight off the attackers. Corporal Apiata received his VC on 26 July 2007 at Government House in Wellington. New Zealand


Second Lieutenant Moana-nui-a-Kiwa Ngarimu, 28th (Maori) Battalion, 2NZEF
Te Moananui-a-Kiwa Ngarimu in 1940

Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa Ngārimu

Date of action: 26 March 1943 (Tebaga Gap, Tunisia)
Date of award: 4 June 1943 (posthumous award)

Moana-nui-a-Kiwa Ngārimu was the first Māori soldier to win the VC. A second lieutenant in the 28th (Maori) Battalion’s C Company, he took part in the assault at Tebaga Gap, Tunisia, in March 1943. The battalion’s objective was a strategically important hill known as Point 209. The first task was to take high ground below the summit. Ngārimu led his platoon up one of these lower hills on 26 March, personally knocking out several machine-gun posts. After capturing the crest, his men repelled a number of fierce German counter-attacks during the night. Despite wounds to his shoulder and leg, Ngārimu refused to leave his position. He was killed the next morning fighting off another enemy attack. His VC was presented to his parents at a hui at Ruatōria on 6 October 1943.

Michael Hackett
02-08-2014, 07:07 PM
Brave men indeed. I'm not denigrating the Purple Heart, which is awarded for combat wounds. Those who have been awarded it have suffered terribly and are deserving of our respect and gratitude. The Victoria Cross and the MOH are a much different category and the heroism involved is beyond belief. These two men demonstrated not only valor, but a selfless conduct that defies mere courage.

You are rightfully proud of these warriors and your warrior heritage.

Riai Maori
02-08-2014, 07:48 PM
Brave men indeed. I'm not denigrating the Purple Heart, which is awarded for combat wounds. Those who have been awarded it have suffered terribly and are deserving of our respect and gratitude. The Victoria Cross and the MOH are a much different category and the heroism involved is beyond belief. These two men demonstrated not only valor, but a selfless conduct that defies mere courage.

You are rightfully proud of these warriors and your warrior heritage.

Thank you Michael for your kind comments. My sincerest apology for the misrepresentation of the "Purple Heart" and thanks again for bringing me up to date with the "Medal Of Honor. Our brave soldiers are "brothers in arms" on the battlefield.

Cliff Judge
02-09-2014, 06:56 AM
So how is the Jo and the taihai similar?

tlk52
02-09-2014, 07:52 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36gE1ukuAdc

Riai Maori
02-09-2014, 11:58 AM
So how is the Jo and the taihai similar?

For a start they are both sticks of wood?:D

Riai Maori
02-09-2014, 12:01 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36gE1ukuAdc

These are similar to Ratten Sticks. But not made of bamboo. Used for song and dance and the development of the wrist for the use of Poi.:)

Cliff Judge
02-09-2014, 01:31 PM
For a start they are both sticks of wood?:D

Hmmm. They appear to be the same length as a jo, but they are more like wooden spears. Osensei was fond of short spears.

Riai Maori
02-09-2014, 02:51 PM
Hmmm. They appear to be the same length as a jo, but they are more like wooden spears. Osensei was fond of short spears.

Correct, but from my experience, the Tiaha is not thrown as you would a spear, this is not to say you can't, but the club end may impede flight. The circular movements and thrusts of the Tiaha are close to some Jo movements. Example of the "Hasso" Technique, you can see in the video where us Maori perform a similar Technique and stance.

dps
02-10-2014, 08:32 AM
I am not surprised at the similarities, there are alot of names for using a stick for martial arts but only a limited number of ways to use it.

Some names:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stick_fighting

Africa: Dambe (Hausa) · Istunka (Somali) · Juego del Palo (Canarian) · Nguni (South Africa) · Nuba · Surma

Asia: Eskrima (Filipino) · (Bojutsu (Japanese, Okinawan) · Dambong-Veng (Cambodia) · Gun (Chinese) · Hanbojutsu (Japanese) · Jojutsu (Japanese) · Lathi khela (Bangladeshi) · Kalaripayat (Keralan) · Silambam (Tamil) · Tanjojutsu (Japanese)

Americas: Juego del Garrote (Venezuela) · Bajan (Barbados) · Calinda (Trinidad)

Europe: Bata (Irish) · Bāton (French) · La canne (French) · Jogo do Pau (Portuguese) · Quarterstaff (English) · Singlestick (British)

and so on.

dps

Riai Maori
02-10-2014, 11:28 AM
I am not surprised at the similarities, there are alot of names for using a stick for martial arts but only a limited number of ways to use it.

Some names:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stick_fighting

Africa: Dambe (Hausa) · Istunka (Somali) · Juego del Palo (Canarian) · Nguni (South Africa) · Nuba · Surma

Asia: Eskrima (Filipino) · (Bojutsu (Japanese, Okinawan) · Dambong-Veng (Cambodia) · Gun (Chinese) · Hanbojutsu (Japanese) · Jojutsu (Japanese) · Lathi khela (Bangladeshi) · Kalaripayat (Keralan) · Silambam (Tamil) · Tanjojutsu (Japanese)

Americas: Juego del Garrote (Venezuela) · Bajan (Barbados) · Calinda (Trinidad)

Europe: Bata (Irish) · Bāton (French) · La canne (French) · Jogo do Pau (Portuguese) · Quarterstaff (English) · Singlestick (British)

and so on.

dps

Every country in the world have stick weapons. Not just the above mentioned. Heck you can find a stick anywhere...on the beach...on the street...and so on... But are you aware that our Maori & Japanese languages and culture are similar? A classic example is we take our shoes off when entering the Wharenui, as do the Japanese.

Riai Maori
02-10-2014, 11:46 AM
Retraction: Every Country, should be Most countries. Thank you

Cliff Judge
02-10-2014, 11:58 AM
Correct, but from my experience, the Tiaha is not thrown as you would a spear, this is not to say you can't, but the club end may impede flight. The circular movements and thrusts of the Tiaha are close to some Jo movements. Example of the "Hasso" Technique, you can see in the video where us Maori perform a similar Technique and stance.

I don't believe the Japanese - the ones who brought rice agriculture to Japan, at any rate - used spears that were designed for throwing, fwiw.