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JoelLM
01-23-2014, 07:21 PM
Hi, how's everyone doing? :D

So, I'll confess, I'm a little board, I've been searching this forum on different topics on Aikido and I've managed to answer a lot of questions. I've started to jump from topic to topic and most of these are a year or so old, I want a little interactions. I figured this will give you guys the opertunity to get to know me and alow me to get to know you guys, seem fair?:hypno:

Of course we will keep this on Aikido, so ill ask a few questions, maybe we can drum up a little conversation. What skills and techniques do you think is most important for a new student to master?

What are some of the biggest mistakes you see new students make? How would you address these problems? What are the biggest waist of times, if any?

If you had two months to give someone a good foundation, what techniques would you focuse on? Why?

What was one of the most valuable skills you learned doing aikido?

I think its fair to say anyone who has interest in aikido knows who Morihei Ueshiba is and who his students are. Who do you think is having a powerful impact in the Aikido world in the last few years? Who are some new up and coming greats?

Okay well, I think this is a good starting point? Feel free to post your own question. Lets get this discussion rolling.:cool:

Janet Rosen
01-23-2014, 09:12 PM
Hi, Joel, and welcome.
My suggestion would be for you to create separate "threads", each one with the subject of yoyr question
Otherwise this thread will become an unmanagable babble!!!

JoelLM
01-23-2014, 09:49 PM
That could be, most of these questions are almost directly related to one another with the exception of the last question. I'm hoping that anyone who chooses to get involved in this discussion can keep it relevent. I've only take a few aikido classes, the questions iv asked are question I hope will help me get a better understanding of the training aspect of aikido and where people struggled, excelled. Furthermore, the answers to these questions should directly reflect ones own experience, I dont forsee them being too controversia(I don't think it's appropriate for someone to tell how you experience something but they are more then welcome to compare their own experience with yours), if for some reason the topic at hand becomes controversial, present your argument and move on.

I really hope this thread doesn't become unmanageable, but I really don't want to creat a new thread for each an every one of my questions especially when I feel that they relate to one another. Maybe I can count on you Janet to help me keep this thread in order ;). Lastly, this is just as much about learning aikido as it is about getting to know the community here at aikiweb.

dps
01-24-2014, 05:53 AM
What skills and techniques do you think is most important for a new student to master?:

How to keep your balance and recognizing when your oppponet is unbalanced or disrupting your opponent's balance.


What are some of the biggest mistakes you see new students make?:

Expectations set too high, not spending enough time on basics


How would you address these problems?:

Practice basics over and over and over again, ad infinitum.


What are the biggest waist of times, if any?:

Large seminars taught by elite professionals who do it for the money.


If you had two months to give someone a good foundation, what techniques would you focuse on? Why?:

Unsoku, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWvkQcpGywA
Aiki-Taiso, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3B2PMwdD2cc
Basics.


What was one of the most valuable skills you learned doing aikido?
:
Balance Joel-san, in Aikido and in life.


Who do you think is having a powerful impact in the Aikido world in the last few years? Who are some new up and coming greats? :

Each individual who practices Aikdo are the ones that have the most powerful impact and and are the greats of Aikido.

Dave de Vos
01-24-2014, 05:56 AM
Hi, how's everyone doing? :D

Of course we will keep this on Aikido, so ill ask a few questions, maybe we can drum up a little conversation. What skills and techniques do you think is most important for a new student to master?
...
If you had two months to give someone a good foundation, what techniques would you focuse on? Why?


I think aikido takes quite a bit of time to learn. The first two months is just the start of this long journey. In my experience, learning aikido is a gradual process. There will always be things to be improved. Don't expect to "master" anything in the first two months.

I think the most important skills to learn at the start is basic movement and falling / rolling. I think many dojo's do movement drills at the start of a class (before practising techniques). You can do many of those movement drills at home.

You probably won't have much say in which techniques are practised in a class, but in my experience the instructor will let new students practise the more basic techniques anyway, so just try to practise what the instructor is teaching.

Also, you can learn a lot from training partners. Just try to listen and learn from everybody. I think this is more important than focusing on particular techniques.

lbb
01-24-2014, 06:40 AM
What skills and techniques do you think is most important for a new student to master?

This might seem like an obvious point of interest and concern for a new student, but I think this is putting the cart before the horse. Mastery of even the simplest skill is a long way down the road. A new student should not be concerning him/herself with "mastering" anything, but should simply train. "Yes, yes, but what should I be focusing on, what's most important?" Everything. Eat what's put before you, and don't concern yourself with what bits are "most important" or how fast you can digest it and get on to other material. The things you're learning now ARE the material.

What are some of the biggest mistakes you see new students make?

Trying to run before they've learned how to walk, trying to walk before they've learned how to crawl. We all make that one. But the biggest one (and not everyone makes this one) is believing that they "love aikido". It's a bit like believing you love someone that you just met and exchanged greetings with at a cocktail party.

How would you address these problems?

Calm down, chill out, throw out the calendar of days until your first test, don't try to make it all mean something. Just train. It'll all come with time.

If you had two months to give someone a good foundation, what techniques would you focuse on? Why?

I'd focus on getting this person to understand that this is the wrong approach to take.

What was one of the most valuable skills you learned doing aikido?

To just train. Sorry if that sounds like a platitude. Maybe one day it won't.

JoelLM
01-24-2014, 09:41 AM
Expectations set too high, not spending enough time on basics




Practice basics over and over and over again, ad infinitum.


I strongly agree with this, I think a strong foundation is key in any MA. In your experience, do you find that the basics get overlooked or rushed in favor of more complicated techniques in order to keep students interested?

dps
01-24-2014, 09:52 AM
Yes, by students and those who teach.

dps

JoelLM
01-24-2014, 09:57 AM
Dave and Mary thank you for contributing to conversation, im curious about one of your answers Mary.


Trying to run before they've learned how to walk, trying to walk before they've learned how to crawl. We all make that one. But the biggest one (and not everyone makes this one) is believing that they "love aikido". It's a bit like believing you love someone that you just met and exchanged greetings with at a cocktail party.


This seems odd to me, is this like joining Aikido for the wrong reasons or people practicing aikido who don't appreciate or understand the principals Aikido was founded on?

JoelLM
01-24-2014, 10:07 AM
Yes, by students and those who teach.

dps

Once a student has a basic understanding of the basics, is it posible to practice on their own? Or should you always practice under or with a more advanced practitioner?

hughrbeyer
01-24-2014, 10:12 AM
But the biggest one (and not everyone makes this one) is believing that they "love aikido". It's a bit like believing you love someone that you just met and exchanged greetings with at a cocktail party.

The first day I met her, I looked at my future wife and thought, "I could spend my life with you."

The first time I stepped on the mat, I knew I was home.

Rob Watson
01-24-2014, 10:33 AM
What skills and techniques do you think is most important for a new student to master?

Mouth shut, eyes open and mind quiet ... pay strict attention. Everything else come easy after that.

lbb
01-24-2014, 11:00 AM
The first day I met her, I looked at my future wife and thought, "I could spend my life with you."

The first time I stepped on the mat, I knew I was home.

"I want to spend my life with you" doesn't make sense to me, when you didn't know who "you" was.

"I love aikido" doesn't make sense to me, when you don't know what "aikido" is.

You can love something that you just started doing. You can feel a strong feeling for a person you just met, that's fine too. But saying that you love something/someone you don't yet know makes no sense to me.

Richard Vader
01-24-2014, 11:06 AM
"I want to spend my life with you" doesn't make sense to me, when you didn't know who "you" was.

"I love aikido" doesn't make sense to me, when you don't know what "aikido" is.

You can love something that you just started doing. You can feel a strong feeling for a person you just met, that's fine too. But saying that you love something/someone you don't yet know makes no sense to me.

Seems to me that different persons interpret the word love differently

lbb
01-24-2014, 11:18 AM
This seems odd to me, is this like joining Aikido for the wrong reasons or people practicing aikido who don't appreciate or understand the principals Aikido was founded on?

How could anybody who just walked in the door appreciate or understand Aikido's founding principles? They could read a sound bite description of "what aikido is/what it's about", they could think they understand it, but that's not understanding aikido. As for joining for the wrong reasons, I think that most people who are still training after five or ten years, are training for different reasons than the reasons that they joined. So, it's not "wrong" exactly, but the reasons why you walk in the door and take up an activity about which you know only superficial things, are almost guaranteed to be different from the reasons why you stay (if you do).

JoelLM
01-24-2014, 11:49 AM
How could anybody who just walked in the door appreciate or understand Aikido's founding principles? They could read a sound bite description of "what aikido is/what it's about", they could think they understand it, but that's not understanding aikido. As for joining for the wrong reasons, I think that most people who are still training after five or ten years, are training for different reasons than the reasons that they joined. So, it's not "wrong" exactly, but the reasons why you walk in the door and take up an activity about which you know only superficial things, are almost guaranteed to be different from the reasons why you stay (if you do).

You are a very philosophical person Mary :D , I can't say I agree with everything you've stated but you do make some good points.

I want to like Aikido, I am having a hard time falling in love with it, this might be a reason why iv only attended a hand full of classes sporadically. I do want to give Aikido a chance to win me over as stated by meany it's an art that requires a lot of time and dedication before you even begin scratching the surface.

Brian Gillaspie
01-24-2014, 01:16 PM
I would recommend dedicating some time, maybe a few weeks, and train consistantly. At that point if you are not enjoying it then I would move on. It's just my opinion but life is to short to spend time pursuing something you don't like. If after a few weeks you are having a good time then stick with it a while and see what happens.

Just don't expect some life changing enlightenment to occur and you'll be ok. I'm not saying that won't happen but don't expect too much out of aikido. After 10 years of training I can aikido has improved my life. Not because of techniques I learned but because it gives me time to do something that makes me happy and I have made some great friends from training.

Janet Rosen
01-24-2014, 01:19 PM
I want to like Aikido, I am having a hard time falling in love with it, this might be a reason why iv only attended a hand full of classes sporadically. I do want to give Aikido a chance to win me over as stated by meany it's an art that requires a lot of time and dedication before you even begin scratching the surface.

I had/have no "natural" talent for Aikido or anything movement based, yet from the first class I was hooked - call it "love" or not; there was something there that kept me engaged and coming back, even when classes were frustrating (and, Mary, FWIW, I met my husband on the phone, we moved in together six weeks later...that was 1997... :-) ) .... so I'm intrigued by what you say and have to ask: if you don't actually like Aikido, why do you want to?

hughrbeyer
01-24-2014, 03:01 PM
"I want to spend my life with you" doesn't make sense to me, when you didn't know who "you" was.

"I love aikido" doesn't make sense to me, when you don't know what "aikido" is.

Le cœur a ses raisons, que la raison ne connaît point.

Do you not understand this? If not, God bless and carry on... but give those who do some latitude.

lbb
01-24-2014, 03:33 PM
Le cœur a ses raisons, que la raison ne connaît point.

Do you not understand this? If not, God bless and carry on... but give those who do some latitude.
Why do you see my opinion as some kind of personal attack? It's not about you. It's not about anyone. How many times have I seen people here observe that the most gung-ho, "in love" newbies are the least likely to still be around in a year? And while we're swapping folk aphorisms, how about "Marry in haste, repent in leisure"? It's very nice for you that you experienced an exception, both with your future wife and with aikido, but it was an exception -- and to my original point, I doubt you'll claim that you knew either your wife or aikido "at first sight".

hughrbeyer
01-24-2014, 03:46 PM
Stand down, I didn't interpret anything you said as a personal attack, and nothing I said was meant as a personal defense.

My only point is that your experience, as I'm sure you know in your head though perhaps not in your heart, is not universal. Did I know my wife at first sight? Not in my head... but my heart begs to differ. Do those who fall in love with Aikido on the first day know Aikido? Certainly not--for some. For others, don't be too quick to burst their bubble. Whatever their relationship to Aikido is, it's their relationship--not for anyone else to fix or improve.

JoelLM
01-24-2014, 04:04 PM
I had/have no "natural" talent for Aikido or anything movement based, yet from the first class I was hooked - call it "love" or not; there was something there that kept me engaged and coming back, even when classes were frustrating (and, Mary, FWIW, I met my husband on the phone, we moved in together six weeks later...that was 1997... :-) ) .... so I'm intrigued by what you say and have to ask: if you don't actually like Aikido, why do you want to?

It's not that I do not like or enjoy aikido but I do come from a sports derived MA so there are a few principles that I grew up with that aikido dose not support, such as no pressure testing. This makes certain aspects of Aikido hard for me to digest, that being said im looking for a long term commitment, something I can start while im still young and continue in my old age. You do not have this with a lot of sports derived MA because of the higher risk of injury.

JoelLM
01-24-2014, 04:30 PM
I would recommend dedicating some time, maybe a few weeks, and train consistantly. At that point if you are not enjoying it then I would move on. It's just my opinion but life is to short to spend time pursuing something you don't like. If after a few weeks you are having a good time then stick with it a while and see what happens.

Just don't expect some life changing enlightenment to occur and you'll be ok. I'm not saying that won't happen but don't expect too much out of aikido. After 10 years of training I can aikido has improved my life. Not because of techniques I learned but because it gives me time to do something that makes me happy and I have made some great friends from training.

Your absolutely right and I do plann to explore other martial art but my options are limited and are being exhausted rather rapidly. Whitehorse is a small community with a boxing club, judo club, a karate club, an MMA club :yuck: , and two aikido clubs.

Boxing I've done and can return to at any point, im not as competitive as I once was so im no hurry to go back.

Judo looks great and there is a strong chance that I will make my way to that club at some point, the problem is I'd rather take a more traditional Judo apposed to sports judo which is what this club focuses on.

I started with Karate, I've no interest in going back, I have no love for it.

I abhor MMA, I have meany reasons for this, feel free to ask if your interested to know why.

And then Aikido, I really enjoy watching people doing Aikido, I like the non violent philosophy behind Aikido, I think its a beautiful art. In a sense I find that it incorporates philosophy, meditation, physical fitness, and history really well. Something about it just Jives well with me but there are just a few things that really bug me about it that I just can't quite put my finger on, kind of like an ich you can't reach. Well some of the things I do know but I will not discuss them here. It's been discussed meany times, the poor hourses corpse has been beaten to oblivion.

Janet Rosen
01-24-2014, 05:29 PM
It's not that I do not like or enjoy aikido but I do come from a sports derived MA so there are a few principles that I grew up with that aikido dose not support, such as no pressure testing. This makes certain aspects of Aikido hard for me to digest, that being said im looking for a long term commitment, something I can start while im still young and continue in my old age. You do not have this with a lot of sports derived MA because of the higher risk of injury.

OK, that's clear then.
Certainly in any aikido dojo, when folks are new, there is no "pressure testing." The idea is that while you are learning the basics of where and how to move you need to learn to do so without somebody putting the brakes on; otherwise, like learning to drive while the instructor brakes each time you accelerate. Especially in an art that stresses relaxed movement, if your partner is forcing you into muscle tension every time you try to move....well then you won't actually learn to move in a relaxed way.
Having said that....as you get advanced....some dojos never do the kind of reality testing it sounds like you want, some dojos do have it built into their formal curriculum, and some don't talk about it but their dojocho do teach that way. So it really depends on where/with whom you train.
As you note, in a small community you have to deal with the available options....so yeah, stay with it, understand that any given dojo may not actually be fully congruent with what you think you need or want, but see also if there enough things of value for you to gain, knowing at some time you may have an opportunity to move on as well....or find something within the current one that you appreciate deeply....who knows?

lbb
01-24-2014, 07:09 PM
My only point is that your experience, as I'm sure you know in your head though perhaps not in your heart, is not universal.

Yes, that flamingly obvious truism managed to penetrate even my thick skull. :confused:

Did I know my wife at first sight? Not in my head... but my heart begs to differ. Do those who fall in love with Aikido on the first day know Aikido? Certainly not--for some. For others, don't be too quick to burst their bubble. Whatever their relationship to Aikido is, it's their relationship--not for anyone else to fix or improve.

So you don't think anyone should "burst the bubble" of a brand new newbie who thinks that they know what aikido is all about? And you think that's somehow helpful to them? And that being introduced to the idea that they don't know and that it is OK not to know is somehow harmful to them? OK, whatever. Nothing more to discuss here. My experience of not knowing, and knowing that I didn't know, has apparently been very different from yours and the students you've observed...not nearly so threatening and damaging.

JoelLM
01-24-2014, 07:48 PM
Yes, that flamingly obvious truism managed to penetrate even my thick skull. :confused:

I could be wrong but I don't think that's what he ment, I dont think he was trying to attack you and your views personally.

Lets try it keep this on track :D .

Mary, if you came across a student who insisted he knew what Aikido was both fundamentally and practically, how would you approach him? What would you tell him?

In your opinion Mary and from your experience what is Aikido all about?

hughrbeyer
01-24-2014, 09:25 PM
So you don't think anyone should "burst the bubble" of a brand new newbie who thinks that they know what aikido is all about? And you think that's somehow helpful to them? And that being introduced to the idea that they don't know and that it is OK not to know is somehow harmful to them? OK, whatever. Nothing more to discuss here. My experience of not knowing, and knowing that I didn't know, has apparently been very different from yours and the students you've observed...not nearly so threatening and damaging.

But we're not talking about the know-it-all who thinks they understand everything already. If you'll look up-thread, we're talking about the newbie who claims to have fallen in love with the art on the first day. And yeah, though we with our vast experience and deep knowledge may realize that most of these folks will be gone within the week, or the month, or the year, I don't think we do them any favors to burst their bubble, excuse me, give them the benefit of our perspective. Rather than try to gift them with my experience, better to enjoy their enjoyment of theirs. Even if they do stick with it, that starry-eyed, falling-in-love phase doesn't last long and it does no one any harm. Make the most of it while it lasts.

Even the know-it-all does no one much harm in a physically based art. If he sticks with it, he'll find out how much he doesn't know.

robin_jet_alt
01-24-2014, 10:16 PM
It's not that I do not like or enjoy aikido but I do come from a sports derived MA so there are a few principles that I grew up with that aikido dose not support, such as no pressure testing. This makes certain aspects of Aikido hard for me to digest, that being said im looking for a long term commitment, something I can start while im still young and continue in my old age. You do not have this with a lot of sports derived MA because of the higher risk of injury.

Okay, I didn't really have anything to add until I saw this, but now....

Biggest mistake: No pressure testing. Of course there should be pressure testing. At good dojos, there is always pressure testing among seniors. Of course beginners are not encouraged to engage in this sort of activity because a) their technique is not yet good enough for them to be able to handle it, so it is counterproductive, and b) if they decide to test a more senior person, they are often not able to receive the considerably more difficult fall that is coming.

A case in point is a beginner that we had train with us a few weeks ago. I was trying to guide him into the right position to throw me, but he was being stubborn and saw that as resistance.He was young and gung ho and decided to test me when he was uke. In retrospect, I should have stopped and had a word to him about the danger he was putting himself in, but as you know, that often elicits the response, "you're just saying that because aikido is crap and you can't throw me." So anyway, I just threw him, and he ended up with some very sore ribs. There was no lasting damage (as far as I know), but it is a tricky situation.

Krystal Locke
01-25-2014, 10:19 AM
This is what I reflexively responded with upon only reading up to a point in the thread. Clearly, I got to the party late, but I am going to let my post stand due to its amusingly retroactive propheticness. And with no further ado, I give you.........

Dave and Mary thank you for contributing to conversation, im curious about one of your answers Mary.

This seems odd to me, is this like joining Aikido for the wrong reasons or people practicing aikido who don't appreciate or understand the principals Aikido was founded on?

I'd argue that someone who just starts aikido because they appreciate and understand the principles of aikido really does not appreciate and understand the principles of aikido. The whole point of training in aikido (or anything else) is that you're training in aikido (or that anything else).

Want a truly wild, burning down the house randori of discussion? Put on the Nomex gi and tell us what you think aikido is, what it and its practice necessarily entails, and what it is good for.

Cady Goldfield
01-25-2014, 10:29 AM
Did I know my wife at first sight? Not in my head... but my heart begs to differ. Do those who fall in love with Aikido on the first day know Aikido? Certainly not--for some. For others, don't be too quick to burst their bubble. Whatever their relationship to Aikido is, it's their relationship--not for anyone else to fix or improve.

Nicely said.
I do believe that there are some cues and triggers that people give, that others have the sensitivity to pick up on and automatically "click" with (or be repelled by). IOW, it's all in the heart of the beholder. People have different natures, some optimistic and open and others cynical or skeptical. Each finds his or her way according that nature.

Also, in regards with falling in love with an art at first experience, what's wrong with a honeymoon? Aren't we entitled to experience that rush, before the drudgery of the actual sweat work sets in? ;)

lbb
01-26-2014, 10:38 AM
Mary, if you came across a student who insisted he knew what Aikido was both fundamentally and practically, how would you approach him? What would you tell him?

I wouldn't tell him anything. I'd shrug and go my own way. You can't tell anything to people who are convinced they are right.

In your opinion Mary and from your experience what is Aikido all about?
I'm not so arrogant as to think I know the answer to that question.

lbb
01-26-2014, 10:41 AM
But we're not talking about the know-it-all who thinks they understand everything already. If you'll look up-thread, we're talking about the newbie who claims to have fallen in love with the art on the first day. And yeah, though we with our vast experience and deep knowledge may realize that most of these folks will be gone within the week, or the month, or the year, I don't think we do them any favors to burst their bubble, excuse me, give them the benefit of our perspective. Rather than try to gift them with my experience, better to enjoy their enjoyment of theirs. Even if they do stick with it, that starry-eyed, falling-in-love phase doesn't last long and it does no one any harm. Make the most of it while it lasts.

Fair enough, and certainly you can't talk someone down from this kind of high. What do you do with this person when the high evaporates, though? When they get the "I thought it was gonna be super special ALL THE TIME" blues, and start thinking there's something wrong (with them, with the art, with both) because they don't feel that special feeling all the time? Do you think it's wrong or dangerous to tell a newbie that it WON'T be super special all the time, and that that's OK?

hughrbeyer
01-26-2014, 10:06 PM
What do you do with this person when the high evaporates, though?

Take them out for a beer.

dps
01-26-2014, 10:46 PM
Once a student has a basic understanding of the basics, is it posible to practice on their own? Or should you always practice under or with a more advanced practitioner?

While I was attending a dojo I practiced on my own.
Now that I don't attend a dojo I still practice on my own.
I practice for strength, flexibility and to keep my muscle memory fresh.
Since I stand at work all day I practice unsuko, aiki -taiso and other basics.

Malicat
01-27-2014, 06:02 AM
I'd argue that someone who just starts aikido because they appreciate and understand the principles of aikido really does not appreciate and understand the principles of aikido. The whole point of training in aikido (or anything else) is that you're training in aikido (or that anything else).

Want a truly wild, burning down the house randori of discussion? Put on the Nomex gi and tell us what you think aikido is, what it and its practice necessarily entails, and what it is good for.

It still works Krystal. :) And I took Aikido because it was free, college club dojo, and because I quit doing karate many years previously due to bad personal circumstances. I kept showing up because instructor was patient, interesting, and an excellent teacher. I fell in love with it much later when I realized I would be moving and had to make the decision to commit to my dojo for a 2 hour one way drive to train, or switch styles. That was a year and some change past my initial start date, and my love for Aikido wasn't tested until I had to make a mor difficult commitment.

And... Nomex gi!?!? Where on earth are you doing your gi shopping!??!?!! The tie-dye was bad enough!

--Ashley

kfa4303
01-27-2014, 11:33 AM
1. MOVE YOUR FEET!!!!!!!! ALL techniques start form the ground up whether you're doing karate, fencing, boxing or ballet. If you're feet are "stuck in the mud", or you act like a "deer caught in headlights" you will get destroyed. You can do all the arm flailing you want, but none of it will be as effective as simply moving out of the way. A seemingly simple concept that is extremely difficult for many people to grasp for reasons, I've never fully understood myself. I suppose it's a learned response to fear to simply freeze and hope for the best, which of course never works.

"Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee." -Muhammad Ali
"If you can't dance, you can't fight." -Bruce Lee

2.) New students always expect way too much way too early. I see it with my guitar students all the time. They think they can just pick up an instrument, start strumming and they'll be Jimi Hendrix in a month. It looks easy on TV, right? Once they realize how difficult it is to make even a single chord sound passable, most of them quit.
I try to tell them it's like learning a new language. It's going to take YEARS just to get the basics, and even then you'll have a funny accent. Sadly, our society expects perfection without practice, so if results don't come quick, cheap and easily enough we give, and often when we're just starting to make head way.
Biggest waste of time by far and without exception are anything having to do with "ki" and/or "you had to be there" anecdotal experiences. They're an utter waste of time and help no one. It's like saying "you should've seen Beethoven play in his prime." DUHHHHHHH, but what good does that do me now? Let me guess, he was really, really good. Am I right?
Also, If you have access to "magical life energy, ki, spiritual insight, etc...." then go to you local hospital and help a kid with cancer. Stop rolling around on a mat in a man-skirt. Better yet, come to my hospital. I have a whole floor of cancer kids that would love to benefit your your "spiritual" expertise. After all Osensei could see bullets in mid flight, right? ;) So a little stationary tumor should be no problem. Maybe you can try the Mr. Miyagi hand rubbing trick while your at it.

4. 2 month techniques: irimi, tenkan (i.e. move your feet), nikkyo,

5. Patience is the key to all arts. It's gonna take time........that's the point.

6. In the US there definitely seem to be East and West coast schools/styles/approaches with further "cliques" within them. In terms of "modern" Aikido, I'd say guys like Yamada, Saotome, Doran, Ledyard are all active and influential. If you go a little broader, or further back I'd say guys like Tissier in Europe, Kanai sensei on the East Coast of the US and Furuya sensei on the West Coast were/are all well know and well regarded. Of course, we all have our favorite teachers, but these are names you'll see pop up time and time again.

JoelLM
01-27-2014, 01:04 PM
Karl, I like it, im not sure when the magic ki stuff came in but im glad you got that off your chest :p.