PDA

View Full Version : Is there any other MA that has such self-doubt?


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


jaxonbrown
07-26-2002, 02:53 PM
I'm always hearing 'will this really work?' and 'this technique is useless' from new/old aikido students. Do students of other MAs doubt their art as much as aikidoka? (I've only trained in Aikido so I lack experience)

Deb Fisher
07-26-2002, 02:57 PM
I've only ever trained in aikido and t'ai chi, but these links seem relevant?

http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/evolution.html

http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/fantasy.html

http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/four_focuses.html

Nacho_mx
07-26-2002, 04:47 PM
No technique or amount of training warrants invencibility. I try to focus on the positive aspects of the art in relation to my life, and not dwell in the "will this work?" doubting.

giriasis
07-26-2002, 10:05 PM
I think it is healthy to question some of what we learn. It is also healthy to admit our weaknesses. Once we learn our weaknesses we will be able to overcome them rather than live in some fantasy land that we practice the "ultimate" martial art.

Diablo
07-26-2002, 11:11 PM
I think that practioners of Tai Chi would question there martial art. In the amount of time it takes them to hit somebody, they can be hit about 27 times. But channeling their powers in unison, they can be a force to be reckoned with.

Don't believe me? Go Here>

http://www.arjbarker.com/arjimation/ep5.html

It's all about connection.

Diablo

Nacho_mx
07-27-2002, 12:17 AM
Aikido, the "ultimate" martial art??? I think that if someone only wants to learn self defense or destructive fighting techniques there are quicker and easier options than aikido...just not as rewarding as the aikido experience.

Kevin Wilbanks
07-27-2002, 12:37 AM
Diablo,

Your ideas of Tai Chi are also a cartoon, but it's understandable that you think such, given that most Tai Chi that you see in the US today is just a moving relaxation exercise.

In its origins, Tai Chi was reportedly a formidable art including punches, kicks, uproots, throws, healing arts, and more. The relaxation in motion that it is valued for today can actually enable movement that is lightning fast. Unlike 'hard styles' in which one tenses up at the moment of impact, Tai Chi uses a persistent relaxation, where the body remains relaxed even upon impact/contact. This allows for more speed, because there is no time wasted tensing, then releasing in order to continue to move. If you want to look into an art that incorporates many aspects of old-style Tai Chi, look up Peter Ralston's stuff: http://www.euronet.nl/~tv/chenghsin/

Peter Goldsbury
07-27-2002, 04:11 AM
I'm always hearing 'will this really work?' and 'this technique is useless' from new/old aikido students. Do students of other MAs doubt their art as much as aikidoka? (I've only trained in Aikido so I lack experience)
Mr Brown,

Your experience appears to have been different from mine. I have come across very few aikidoka who doubt their art and the last one who did became sufficiently convinced to come to Las Vegas and take ukemi for me at Aiki Expo. None of the teachers I have had have ever caused me to doubt the effectiveness of the art itself, though I have to admit that most of them have been at the rougher end of the spectrum.

I agree that this topic is often discussed on Internet bulletin boards and I suppose it is not a bad thing to have such discussions. However, I also think that the world of some bulletin boards is far removed from the world of the dojo, especially the dojo in Hiroshima where I train and teach.

Best regards,

isshinryu88
07-27-2002, 04:38 AM
I've studied a number of arts over the years. I think that the presentation of techniques is what results in questions about their effectiveness. In karate, some instructors come up with convoluted and very contrived applications for kata sequences. In another art, we were taught very effective wrist locks (many similar to Aikido), but these were done from a static position. No movement or other "realistic" aspects added to the techniques. All of this leads to questioning.

In general, I think that Aikido is similar to Tai Chi in that it sets about its goals slowly. The focus seems (after my whole 1 1/2 months of experience ;) )to be on developing the balance and body mechanics necessary for techniques to work.

Unlike Tai Chi, but in danger of becoming so, imho, Aikido retains its martial emphasis. Tai Chi has been co-opted to a great degree by the meditation/"get in touch with yourself" crowd. One of the more memorable descriptions of Tai Chi can be found in C.W. Nichol's book "Moving Zen". A high ranking instructor of Shotokan told the author that Tai Chi masters were more than human (or something along those lines-don't have the book with me).

Dave

ChristianBoddum
07-27-2002, 05:23 AM
Hi there !

Maybe I was lucky with my Tai Chi teacher

(Joachim Hauser a Bill Dockens affiliate),

he showed me the difference between real Tai Chi and forced movement - in effect karate ,

and I was early on aware that a punch from this man would surely knock me out,as he wasn't that familiar with aikido I had a chance to find out what Tai Chi was as a figthing art by example,he would let me be uke

and my backrolls came in quite handy,maybe some people learn Tai Chi as a relaxation thing,but what I learned is that the relaxation is to keep your center soft and in motion while the outer part of your body is

hard and strong while fighting.

I'm sure some of you have had similar experiences.

A nice day to y'all. Chr.B.

DaveO
07-27-2002, 06:46 AM
While I agree with Mr. Goldsbury completely, when he says that questioning Aikido's effectiveness is no bad thing, I would like to offer my own opinion: If Aikido didn't work, it wouldn't continue to exist. Trust it, trust your teachers, trust yourself, and its effectiveness will become apparent. :)

Thanx!

Dave

SeiserL
07-27-2002, 10:28 AM
IMHO, be very careful of anyone who doesn't question their art, for they have stopped learning.

Until again,

Lynn

Peter Goldsbury
07-27-2002, 06:35 PM
With two exceptions all my own teachers learned directly from the Founder himself and this is what I had in mind when I stated in an earlier post that none of them ever questioned the effectiveness of aikido as a martial art (even after one of them managed to hit the Founder on the head with a bokken). Oh, and some of them used to go out and test the techniques in the street.

Of course, the underlying principles of the art have to be internalised and mastered by each individual who practises aikido and it is all too easy to slide from, "I cannot make the techniques work in my case", to, "the techniques do not work in any case".

As I intimated earlier, here in Japan people seem to have a clearer idea of what they want from aikido training before they start (in my experience). There is less of the idea that aikido has to prove its effectiveness, so to speak, against other martial arts. Of course, this can lead to complacency, but this, again, is a matter for the individual. Aikido affords a learning process which need (i.e., should) never stop.

Best regards,

Kevin Leavitt
07-27-2002, 07:03 PM
Aikido is not alive...it can not have self doubt. People have self doubt...it applies to the individual...not to the art or the collective aikidoka. I personally have no doubts "if Aikido works"....it doesn't work.

Aikido is a training methodology to study martial arts, spirituality, religion, interpersonal relationships, conflict resolution or whatever else you get out of it on a personal level.

The common definition defines it as "Budo" or Martial art for obvious reasons.

Westerner typically try to place things in nice neat definitions or "boxes". which is why we end up with such discussion on "does Aikido work". Unfortunately definitions are self limiting in nature and try to put boundaries around things so we can try and use them efficiently in concept.

Aikido, or any martial art for that matter, doesn't really work like that.

The more I learn and study Aikido, the better I become, the more I see Tai Chi, Karate, Kung Fu, Ballet, and everything else in Aikido.

Aikido doesn't work...people work. If you get into a fight or something you don't use Aikido, you use your "self"...your mind, body, and spirit to resolve the situation. Sometimes you can talk your way out...sometimes you fight your way out...but you never use an "Aikido Technique"...you use your martial self which may or may not of been trained in aikido.

Aikido is a path, or methodolgy to whatever end you want. If your goal is to be a street fighter, then there are probably faster ways to achieve that endstate. Can you do it studying aikido? Probably, but it may take longer or it may not.

Again, doubt is an individual concern...not a universal concern. I don't doubt my martial abilities, but There is always someone bigger and badder, and having a better day than me! So, yes I have doubt about winning everytime!

Dangus
08-07-2002, 01:33 PM
Indeed martial arts don't work, people work martial arts, but the original question still has some validity. Does Aikido training prepare your "martial self" for actual conflict? I would say "yes" from what little I have seen. The problem with Aikido for a lot of people is that it's so subtle and challenging. It is truly effective in the hands of a master who stays calm and feels totally comfortable with it, but in the hands of a newbie, it's only benefit is that it's gotten them into shape.

Guest5678
08-07-2002, 02:28 PM
Goldsbury sensei wrote:

"As I intimated earlier, here in Japan people seem to have a clearer idea of what they want from aikido training before they start (in my experience). There is less of the idea that aikido has to prove its effectiveness, so to speak, against other martial arts. Of course, this can lead to complacency, but this, again, is a matter for the individual. Aikido affords a learning process which need (i.e., should) never stop."

This, to me anyway, is perhaps the most important concept overlooked. Aikido offers so much to so many. If you want to train for ( street attacks ) you certainly can. If you want to increase your ability to center and focus, you certainly can, you can find all kinds of areas to train in with Aikido. It just depends on what you want out of your training.

My experience is that the people who have to ask the question of whether a technique will work or not are also those with little or no actual fighting experience. Thats obviously not a bad thing however, I believe it does increase the amount of time it takes to internalize and evaluate whether a given technique fits them or not....

-Mongo

giriasis
08-07-2002, 02:57 PM
Aikido, the "ultimate" martial art???
Ignacio, I didn't say that aikido is the "ultimate" martial art. Please re-read my words and the entire context of the post. There was a little tongue in cheek there.

To be more clear and less tongue in cheeck. There are people out there who delude themselves in thinking that their particular martial art (insert your choice martial) is the "ultimate". These people seem to be the ones that criticize aikido as not being effective enough. These folks are insecure in their own art.

My point is that the ability to look at our own art and see it's weaknesses is a demonstration of being secure in one's own art. They trust what they are learning and they believe in it enough to not be waivered by questions. It's not about doubt but about seeking what needs to be improved. In doing so, we don't have to think, believe, talk, or act that aikido is an "ultimate" martial art.

JBoswell
08-07-2002, 03:17 PM
What I love is when Sensei gets up there, calls on his Uke who takes him by the wrist... and a split second later the Uke is picking himself up off the floor wondering what happened!

THEN... Sensei asks the question himself to us: "Looks 'fake' doesn't it?" Next person, come here." and I find myself picking myself up off the floor.

Instructors should teach. Part of that is getting the student to understand HOW something works, not just do it and watch it work. Finding a good instructor is KEY! Key, Key, Key! Don't stop till you're satisfied you got a good one.

AikiAlf
08-07-2002, 03:20 PM
Prof. Goldsbury , I agree. This virtual discussion world has little or nothing to do with the dojo.

I think what's disturbing is that I log in to the BB world and see that a large percent of the time is spent 'dissing' Aikido, and Aikido-ka-ist-jin . I can understand when people who are starting come up with a question of understanding a particular technique or exercise. I have a harder time understanding those voices who seem to be more experienced that basically argue that we're all deluding ourselves by practicing this as a Budo; that there's watering down and fantasizing going on all the time.

My instructors are both (for different reasons) very confident in their abilities. When I train I feel confident in my practice even so far as to not be disturbed when things don't work out as expected.

I don't feel entitled to voice this confidence in a forum where people so much more senior to myself in practice engage in vigorous self doubt all the time.

arghhhhh I just can't shut up can I?

otto
08-07-2002, 03:54 PM
With two exceptions all my own teachers learned directly from the Founder himself...
WOW!!....

Erik
08-07-2002, 06:07 PM
Sheesh! Here he goes with another long one.

One possibility in my little world is that because most of us lack competition we don't have a clear and direct feedback method of testing whether our stuff works or doesn't work. In Karate, by the time you reach black belt, you've probably thumped on enough blue and brown belts that you have a pretty clear conception of where you are in the food chain. You know that your stuff works in certain cases and not in others given the context of the practice. It provides a degree of certainty even if it may be unfounded in it's own way. Aikido, because it's often cooperative never quite provides the finality of that feedback. So unless we dojo bash, crash bars or have a bad attitude we're never quite sure and I think it colors how we answer these questions.

One of my first teachers was a military guy and I never doubted him. Not his aikido so much but him personally. Now as he's well into his 60's I'm sure I could get him. Not everytime but certainly some of the time. The thing was, I always knew that if I did that I'd have to finish it, permanently, bury the body in the hills and never talk about it. It had to be final.

OK, I'm a sick bastard but tell me you've never measured yourself against the folks around you? liars! :)

Because he had that certainty, it allowed him to practice and work on his art in a different way than I could. That confidence allowed him to walk into a mixed martial arts seminar and say, "Aikido is love" while I tried to dive for cover. "Uh, no I'm not a member of the host dojo. Who let this crazy guy in here? Erik? I'm not Erik, I'm Fred and I do, I do, well, whatever I do it isn't Aikido." For him it was irrelevant as he had a certainly I'll probably never possess. Today that wouldn't faze me, well, at least not very much.

There is something to being tested under fire and having that certainty. On the other hand, and I never asked him this, I wonder if he thought it was worth having?

PS: I may at times appear critical of our art. Actually, what I'm doing is challenging thought processes, my own as much as anything. I find forums like this invaluable in this way. There is an incredible amount of good stuff in this art although I may forget to mention them at times.

Questioner: "Erik, is the glass half-full or half-empty?"

Erik: "Are you sure that's water?"

SeiserL
08-08-2002, 09:44 AM
IMHO, "self" doubt is about "you" and goes with "you" where ever "you" go. So, know what "you" want, what "you" have to do to get it, then do it.

Until again,

Lynn

Erik
08-08-2002, 04:26 PM
I just wanted to add something to my missive. I'm talking about knowing something works or knowing that you have the will when it's needed.

I recently watched a program on the Navy Seals and to me two things stood out. First, the survivors know they can go further on less than they ever imagined because they've done it. Second, they know that they are better than 60+ individuals, pretty damn good one's at that, who rang the bell and quit. The process provides people who have proven they are elite and know it.

I know of no process, possibly the Yoshinkai Senshui program, within Aikido which still provides this. Maybe it isn't necessary but for what it's worth, it's the level I was talking about.

Bruce Baker
08-08-2002, 05:30 PM
There will always be that moment when you have to 'put up or shut up', and there ain't not room to get out the door and head for the hills. That is when you think,"I sure hope this works like it did in practice."

As for the attitude of throwing down to the point of finishing your opponent so that he or she is fodder for the hills ... that is precisely the mindset that Aikido trys to avoid and curtail as all costs, but will we will run to the end if there is no other possible way to find the harmony of the situation.

I still think everyone should train at least two years in Judo, Jujitsu, Karate, before coming to Aikido really appreciate the complexity of Aikido and how it increases the effectiveness of the other arts.

If you come across someone who is not responsive to your techniques or your strikes, remember the rule of three. It takes three strikes to get through the protective juices of a nerve end. Hence three consecutive strikes will cause an effective reaction no matter how big and nasty your opponent is.

So one or two may not be enough to get a reaction, but three is the charm ... as we used to say.

As far as your effectiveness in using a technique, that is also a matter of learning how to use your techniques to activate these little transmitters of pain, sometimes called nerve endings or pressure points, with practice, observation, and more practice.

If it doesn't hurt, or create some kind of pain, then it isn't working. Do it right, and you will be effective, while maintaining the safe practice standards we encourage for Aikido.

So, if you are looking for answers to how effective any martial art can be, how many hits does it take to be effective, or how well does it protect you, or most importantly, how does it affect your attitude to life?

There are hidden techniques in kata. There are fighting techniques in kata. Tai chi has so many fighting techniques that it really amazes me whenever I watch practice.

So don't go bashing something because you can not concieve of its usefullness in the martial/ fighting community or confusing your ineffectiveness because you don't understand the actual mechanics that make kata into deadly fighting movements.

I guess it is like the soldier that has seen so much killing, and knows so much about war, he/she finds the peaceful way because they truly understand that war/ fighting is not the true way to find the future of humanity.

(Kind of preachy, but there it is.)

You gotta love Aikido practice after being injured black and blue, or cranked so hard that it takes days to recover. If you don't, I sure do love practicing hard without getting injured anymore.

Jim23
08-08-2002, 09:50 PM
There will always be that moment when you have to 'put up or shut up'
I thought it was "Shut up and train".

Anyway, I agree with Erik on this one. If I got into a sticky situation, I would prefer to have my old Karate sensei (Kyokushinkai) beside me over my current Aikido sensei (and others that I've seen).

I'm not saying that I don't respect my current sensei's skill (very good) and experience, and haven't enjoyed his demonstrations; it's just that I don't really know how effective he'd be. With the Karate guy, there's no doubt in my mind - I've seen him surrounded by "beginners" (some pretty scary newbies who were simply told to attack him any way they'd like) whom he dealt with very effectively. And I've also felt the wrath of his kicks and punches.

As terrible as it sounds, I really feel that way.

Don't get me wrong, Aikido's fun and good self defence too. It has great surprise techniques to stop an agressor. However, I do question it's effectiveness at times (not the techniques, per se, but the people performing them).

Jim23

jk
08-08-2002, 10:25 PM
The self-doubt may be a function of aikido's inclusiveness. I may be wrong, but I suspect aikido attracts a much more diverse population of practitioners versus arts/sports such as Kyokushin karate, freestyle wrestling or Sambo, for example.

If you have a pool of aikidoka that more represents the general population in terms of "innate martial ability/agressiveness" (for lack of a better term), then you're gonna have a whole bunch of folks in the middle of that bell curve that says they're "average," training be dammned. Yes, you can have a small subset of aikidoka who undergo a selection process akin to the ones required for the SAS or the SEALs, and they'll probably be pretty damn martially effective, but an art is usually judged by the population of its practitioners as a whole. You have a large amount of people practicing tai chi, and no doubt a few of them are extremely effective martial artists, but to the general public, tai chi is a nice exercise for old geezers in the park. You do not usually ask, "how would a tai chi guy do in a mixed martial arts competition (for lack of an easy proxy for unarmed combat)?" Compare this with the pool of shootfighters, amateur and professional. Hmmm...

Regards,

Kevin Wilbanks
08-08-2002, 10:52 PM
The fact that any art is full of hidden 'kuzushi' isn't particularly relevant to a real situation. If you don't actually practice them at real or near-real levels of speed, power, fear, adrenaline, etc... they are likely to remain hidden: mere intellectual possibilities. Tai Chi was once a comprehensive and formidable fighting art, but if you think 99% of the people who participate in its current relaxation exercise form would last 3 seconds in a fight against any well-conditioned person who knows how to punch, you're delusional.

Logically speaking, Aikido has major weaknesses that can't be ignored.

As pointed out, #1 is no adrenaline-pumped reality testing or free sparring.

I think the fact that all Aikido techniques are responses is another big problem. It adds a lot of risk and uncertainty to any situation. If I knew I was going to be in real fights, I would develop exceptional conditioning and speed, devastating, simple direct attacks, and I would attack first if at all possible - take the advantage and keep it, and don't let up. The history of the world's military confrontations clearly shows that victory without strong offense is rare.

The other problem is that Aikido techniques are only designed to handle a narrow range of possibilities effectively: where someone comes at you from about six feet away, where someone grabs your limbs or clothing, or grabs you from behind. Aikido's ground/pinning techniques are amusingly naive to even moderately experienced grapplers. I've seen very martial Aikido black belts who couldn't to anything from a standing grappler's clinch, and I've never seen Aikido trained to reasonably handle rapidfire combinations from close striking range.

I'm open to the possiblity that someone with rigorous Aikido-only training for more than a decade would be up to handling an average unarmed attacker on the street. That seems plausible. But, if you're talking real martial effectiveness - as in fighting opponents fully versed in a wide range of striking, grappling, and ground techniques... forget it. I would put any of the top shootfighters, vale-tudo, or UFC guys against any pure Aikido shihan/sensei in the world. You could mix and match them all you want, and I'll bet no Aikidoka would last more than 2 minutes.

chadsieger
08-10-2002, 12:00 PM
Mr. Wilbanks wrote:
The other problem is that Aikido techniques are only designed to handle a narrow range of possibilities effectively. But, if you're talking real martial effectiveness - as in fighting opponents fully versed in a wide range of striking, grappling, and ground techniques... forget it. I would put any of the top shootfighters, vale-tudo, or UFC guys against any pure Aikido shihan/sensei in the world. You could mix and match them all you want, and I'll bet no Aikidoka would last more than 2 minutes.

I'm afraid that I would have to disagree. Many (not all) of the Aikidoka that I know, train martialy. We train internally, which when used correctly in-conjunction with a well trained mind, effectivly nullifies attacks. Also, it need not take 10 or more years to develop some compedency, it depends on the training.

Thanks.

Kevin Wilbanks
08-10-2002, 12:08 PM
We train internally, which when used correctly in-conjunction with a well trained mind, effectivly nullifies attacks
Right. I suppose these mysterious powers also deflect bullets and knife blades...

chadsieger
08-10-2002, 12:40 PM
Mr. Wilbanks wrote:
Right. I suppose these mysterious powers also deflect bullets and knife blades...

Deflect, no. Anticipate, yes.

kewms
08-10-2002, 04:37 PM
>>If it doesn't hurt, or create some kind of pain, then it isn't working. <<

Really?

I've had my balance taken so effectively that it felt like I'd stepped on a banana peel. It didn't hurt, but it definitely worked.

Katherine

Kevin Leavitt
08-10-2002, 11:12 PM
To Kevin Willibanks,

I agree with some of your critcisms. Yes, it is possible for someone to train years in aikido in a aikido dojo and not really be very martially effective. (I have seen it in my dojo).

I disagree that Aikido is narrow in range. I have regularly sparred with people from other schools to include BJJers, Karate, Kung FU. and yes I have even done the for UFC type thing. (which has rules and changes the martial dynamic tremendously, but won't go there right now!). In my opinion Aikido has prepared me fairly well for dealing with things.

It did not prepare my martial awareness. That came primarly as a Army Ranger, studying a hard style karate system for about 10 years, and a few other things I have done in my past.

My advice for anyone looking to be martially effective is to study with a few different schools hard and soft. (BTW Musashi recommended the same thing!) The purpose of Aikido is not to make you a martial arts super stud warrior...but to learn how to be a better person..yada, yada, yada. It is when I started doing aikido and stopped being such a meathead that I really improved as a martial artist and as a human being.

So I consider aikido to be a superior art in that regard!

BTW, I consider BJJ to be much more narrower in focus than Aikido in many ways.

Kevin Leavitt
08-10-2002, 11:18 PM
Thought I should add this:

BJJ itself is not narrow...just the way alot of the people I have seen practicing it here in my area.

The Gracie's have a complete system, but it really has spread fast in the U.S. and I doubt that very few practicioners have been able to correctly internalize this system to it's fullest potential.

Sorry for the over generalization.

PeterR
08-12-2002, 12:08 AM
Is it just me or do I detect a real organizational relationship to this hang wringing.

I sure don't here much of it amoung Shodokan folks, neither Yoshinkan or Yoseikan. The boys from Iwama are pretty quiet about this also. Is there a defeatest mind set being instilled or something else.

Kevin Leavitt
08-12-2002, 06:53 AM
Good stuff in last couple of post. Agree with most all points.

I too think you should study karate or another hard style for several years prior to aikido. (I'm not talking the commercial/competition corner dojo, but a real hard style budo).

I have the fortune to really want to have my sensei beside me in a real situation. In fact all my sensei's over last 10 years are worthy of such confidence!

Why study with someone you don't have confidence in as a warrior? Seems like a waste of time if you don't think they could hold up as a warrior.

FWIW, all my sensei's have studied other systems and had black belts in them prior to aikido. Don't know if this was intentional, but I find it intriguing none the less!

Kevin Leavitt
08-12-2002, 06:56 AM
Oh on the "shodokan confidence" thing.....

That attitude of confidence can be very dangerous for them. While they may not seem to have as much doubt as Aikidoka, that in itself may not be a positive thing.

I have burst many a bubble from very confident hard stylist when they find themselves flattened out on the floor by a guy that is relaxed and smiling the whole time.

As Lynn pointed out, "a martial artist that does not have doubt has stopped learning!"

PeterR
08-12-2002, 07:34 AM
That attitude of confidence can be very dangerous for them. While they may not seem to have as much doubt as Aikidoka, that in itself may not be a positive thing.
Sorry Kevin - you might have missed it. Shodokan is a style of Aikido, as is Yoshinkan and Yoseikan. I also didn't mean that there practioners are swaggering around claiming they can kick the proverbial buttock just that they tend to be less concerned about how their art stacks up against [insert style of choice here].

Kevin Leavitt
08-12-2002, 10:30 PM
Oops Misread it! I meant SHOTOKAN as in Karate! Anyway, dug myself into a deep whole on this one anyway, so will leave well enough alone.

I am curious in other countries like Japan if the fact that they don't have as many issues as the U.S. is that maybe typically they grow up in a more martially oriented culture or come more from other arts.

The main people that seem to have confidence issues with Aikido (in my experiences) seems to be those that are somewhat new....not only to aikido...but to martial arts in general.

kewms
08-12-2002, 11:20 PM
>>The main people that seem to have confidence issues with Aikido (in my experiences) seems to be those that are somewhat new....not only to aikido...but to martial arts in general.<<

Some people begin to study martial arts because they are afraid that a Bad Guy is lurking in every shadow, ready to pounce. Worse, the characteristics of this Bad Guy are drawn straight from the movies, and have very little to do with what statistics tell us about real life attackers.

In the movies, you defeat the Bad Guy by beating him up. Aikido spends little or no time teaching you to beat people up. So it can't possibly work.

Katherine