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mathewjgano
03-10-2013, 01:35 PM
This is from another thread, but I was curious about the phrase "waki ga nai." He describes this in terms of not leaving an opening, but I've always heard of opening as "suki."
Does this mean something like "don't be divided?" Any insights would be appreciated!
Take care, all!
Matthew

The essence of Budo is the absence of openings, waki ga nai, which means never leaving an opening...

odudog
03-10-2013, 02:21 PM
1: armpit; under one's arm; side; flank;
2: beside; close to; near; by;
3: aside; to the side; away; out of the way;
4: off-track; off-topic;

This is from one of my Japanese dictionaries. I take it that he using the first context (flank). Make sure you can't be out flanked, hence, no openings on your side.

Travers Hughes
03-10-2013, 05:57 PM
This is from another thread, but I was curious about the phrase "waki ga nai." He describes this in terms of not leaving an opening, but I've always heard of opening as "suki."
Does this mean something like "don't be divided?" Any insights would be appreciated!
Take care, all!
Matthew

Hi Matthew - sounds like comes from the "waki o shimeru" (close your armpits) - this is a term often used in kendo - in closing your armpits, you're keeping your shoulders and elbows down, and not leaving an opening for anyone to take your balance.

I remember Prof. Goldsbury mentioning this term and it's usage in aikido at the Australian Winter School (Gold Coast) in July 2010 - perhaps he may have more information for you?

CHeers

mathewjgano
03-10-2013, 10:52 PM
Thank you, Mike and Travers!

Carsten Möllering
03-11-2013, 05:07 AM
I suggest to look up
わけがない (wake ga nai) (http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/cgi-bin/wwwjdic.cgi?1C).

Peter Goldsbury
03-12-2013, 04:54 PM
Hi Matthew - sounds like comes from the "waki o shimeru" (close your armpits) - this is a term often used in kendo - in closing your armpits, you're keeping your shoulders and elbows down, and not leaving an opening for anyone to take your balance.

I remember Prof. Goldsbury mentioning this term and it's usage in aikido at the Australian Winter School (Gold Coast) in July 2010 - perhaps he may have more information for you?

CHeers

Well, we had a discussion about this in the dojo last night, after training. All the participants (all native Japanese except me) thought that it was a mistake, either for 隙がない (suki ga nai) or for another phrase entirely, such as 傍が甘え. (waki ga amae). This last phrase means that one's defences are weak and is clearly opposite in meaning to what is intended by the original phrase.

JW
03-12-2013, 09:51 PM
If you use Carsten's link and look up ¤ï¤­¤¬¤Ê¤¤ you get "abnormal underarm odor!" So maybe it wasn't a mistake.
I have not experienced Tissier sensei's, but mine certainly leaves no opening at my best (?) of times.

[alas, that result was actually for æþ½­, pronounced ¤ï¤­¤¬]

Peter Goldsbury
03-12-2013, 11:03 PM
Carsten's reference is to Jim Breen's WWWJDIC. Here is a link to his Japanese website:

http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/japanese.html

Personally, I prefer the 'living dictionaries' who are the colleagues I work and train with, but YMMV.

Of course, Matthew, you could always ask the man himself what he meant:

http://www.christiantissier.com/index.htm

There are contact details and I know he speaks good English.

Carsten Möllering
03-13-2013, 06:18 AM
This is, what I found:

わけがない 《訳がない(P); 訳が無い; わけが無い》 (exp) (uk) there is no way that ... (expresses speaker's belief that something is impossible);

Having no living dicionary around at the moment I asked Mr. and Mrs. Google and found Mr. Breens translation in different places.
I also checked it with "Ulrich Apels Japanisch-Deutsches Wörterbuch" and found the same meaning:
"It is not possible ... "

And yes, please: Christian Tissier is "approachable" and tries to answer questions as best as he can.

Travers Hughes
03-14-2013, 12:44 AM
Well, we had a discussion about this in the dojo last night, after training. All the participants (all native Japanese except me) thought that it was a mistake, either for 隙がない (suki ga nai) or for another phrase entirely, such as 傍が甘え. (waki ga amae). This last phrase means that one's defences are weak and is clearly opposite in meaning to what is intended by the original phrase.

Thank you for your reply, Professor. I also immediately thought of 隙がない , but didn't consider a misquote.

Kind regards,
Travers

ChrisMikk
05-06-2013, 07:22 AM
The Jim Breen translator is pretty straightforward. Just check the "Search using romanized Japanese" box and search on "waki ga nai"...

わきが甘い; 脇が甘い 【わきがあまい】 (exp,adj-i) (1) {sumo} preventing one's opponent from getting an underarm grip; (2) having weak defenses

Furthermore...

脇(P); 腋; 掖 【わき】 (n) (1) armpit; under one's arm; side; flank;
and
すあま 《素甘; 寿甘》 (n) (uk) sweet mochi cake

Obviously, avoid love handles.