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soupdragon1973
02-01-2013, 05:50 AM
Odd question maybe. If you have had depression or anxiety has practicing Aikido helped in any way? Has it made you less stressed or mindful and therefore able to cope better with depression if you have it? I find I get in some awful black moods before going to the dojo but the focus and time spent there helps lift or alleviate my depression at the time. It could be said that any activity that focuses the mind for an hour or two would help.

Just wanted to know peoples opinions if they have or still do suffer with depression. I dont see any sole activity as a cure, not exercise or anything like that but surely something as focused as Aikido can help to a certain degree and at certain times at least.

Also; is it wrong to take an anti-depressant while training in Aikido? Not so much in that it could make you sleepy or drowsy as I dont have that effect with mine and I can certainly focus well while at the dojo. The question is more of an ethical nature, I dont ssmoke, drink or take drugs but I don in effect take a legalised drug which is an anti-depressant. Another odd question I know. Thanks

Michael Hackett
02-01-2013, 12:07 PM
It is no more wrong to take a prescribed antidepressant while studying aikido than it is to wear an ankle wrap or a bandaid. The question is better directed towards your physician as to whether the level of exercise has any effect on your medication. If you have been prescribed an antidepressant, you should take it regularly as prescribed. Good luck with your training - the activity, the fun, the socialization all may help with your overall well-being.

soupdragon1973
02-01-2013, 12:54 PM
Thank you Michael.

Janet Rosen
02-01-2013, 01:25 PM
Alex, in terms of your second question first: we each of us carry our lives into the dojo with us, good and bad, injuries and meds, limitations, frustrations, goals we are explicitly working on, buttons we don't know we have until they get pushed.....the sole concern regarding any ingested substance is, does it pose a hazard to myself or my training partner? Standard antidepressants currently in use certainly won't affect your partners' safety and shouldn't affect your's except that some have anticholinergic activity (drying) which may make you need to be more aware of coming to class well hydrated and, if it's a long class like at a seminar or during very hot weather bringing liquid along.

In terms of effects on depression - as you note, in itself aikido is not a treatment modality - however, most studies do show that physical activity has a beneficial effect. There is also a lot to be said for being able to get yourself to the dojo and on the mat even if depressed - much the way folks say that having to get up to feed a cat or walk the dog is often a lifesaver - the ability to march oneself through a daily routine even on the day it brings no joy is beneficial in itself in that the routine is there, maintained, the day it begins to bring joy again.

soupdragon1973
02-01-2013, 01:33 PM
Thank you Janet. Yes indeed I have found I need a water bottle with me as I do get dehydrated quickly at the dojo, but that could also be because it is quite warm in there. I know my medication wont affect in any way so that I would become a liability to my training partner and I am quite aware, understanding, open and focused at the dojo. I think that is why I find Aikido especially useful as the focus helps me forget I was feeling depressed and upon leaving the dojo I feel refreshed mentally and awake again. Thank you for your response Janet.

GMaroda
02-03-2013, 03:34 AM
First part: any physical activity can help. Anecdote: it's helped me. It's also helped my social anxiety.

Second part: Never stop taking, or adjust how/when you take, any medication without consulting your doctor. I would think it's unethical to not take a necessary medication as it shows you don't respect yourself enough to accept healing.

Keep training and have fun!

mathewjgano
02-03-2013, 11:32 AM
Odd question maybe. If you have had depression or anxiety has practicing Aikido helped in any way? Has it made you less stressed or mindful and therefore able to cope better with depression if you have it? I find I get in some awful black moods before going to the dojo but the focus and time spent there helps lift or alleviate my depression at the time. It could be said that any activity that focuses the mind for an hour or two would help.

Just wanted to know peoples opinions if they have or still do suffer with depression. I dont see any sole activity as a cure, not exercise or anything like that but surely something as focused as Aikido can help to a certain degree and at certain times at least.

Also; is it wrong to take an anti-depressant while training in Aikido? Not so much in that it could make you sleepy or drowsy as I dont have that effect with mine and I can certainly focus well while at the dojo. The question is more of an ethical nature, I dont ssmoke, drink or take drugs but I don in effect take a legalised drug which is an anti-depressant. Another odd question I know. Thanks

I started doing Aikido when I was in some of the worst of my depression and anxiety. I believe the social interaction and focus on physical activity made a big difference for me. In retrospect the focus on personal discipline and "victory over self" also helped reinforce my efforts to address my mindset positively; it fit nicely as part of my overall efforts.
I don't see anything wrong with taking an anti-depressant while training.
Good luck and good training!
Take care,
Matthew

soupdragon1973
02-03-2013, 11:50 AM
thank you both for responding in kind. I dont see Aikido as a "universal pancea" as someone has suggested, in fact all I actual see it as is form or flowing self defence at its core. I dont impose any spirtual aspect to it, or some harmony with universe type thinking although I do find that aspect interesting. I am not here to tread on anyones feet or beliefs and I respect not just your beliefs but also your art. I respect any martial art. I tend to be a skeptic on many things and I dont see anyone thing as a cure all for a condition as depression but I do wish to know other peoples opinions and experiences if you have had depression or anxiety and found Aikido helped you. I guess it could be any martial art or activity but the peaceful nature of Aikido seems better than being smashed into the mat in say Judo or JuiJitsu. By then what do I know. Perhaps people with depression who practice those arts also find they are just as helpful. Thanks for responding.

SeiserL
02-03-2013, 03:32 PM
IMHO, since depression can be seen as repression and obsession with the negative of the past and AIkido is a positive expression of the present, it can be useful if you train with that intent.

However, Aikido is not competent professional psychotherapy.

soupdragon1973
02-03-2013, 04:43 PM
No, its not but then pyschotherapy has its failings also and its expensive. As I said, there is no one thing or activity that will help depression alone. I was told physical activity such as jogging or swimming would help and it does, briefly. I would rather do some physical activity than take a medication but due to shin splints I cant run as often as I like and swimming during the day is out of the question due to work shifts.

Anyhow thank you for your input. Maybe I should have posed this question on a depression forum haha!

Cliff Judge
02-06-2013, 08:03 AM
I have been having a conversation with an old friend lately about depression, and during this conversation I have repeatedly noted that, since I started training Aikido assiduously eleven years ago, no matter how black and hopeless my mood or outlook, I keep moving forward. I get onto the mat, I train, and this keeps the rest of the daily cycle in motion: I take care of personal hygiene, I eat, I sleep generally well. Getting out of bed takes some time on occasion, but I get to work and keep my job. Aikido is probably not the only activity that can have this quality, but I think martial arts in particular do.

soupdragon1973
02-13-2013, 06:01 AM
thanks Cliff. Yeah I find just the activity of getting out the house and doing something positive and focused helps. I took up Jui Jitsu as well recently. I find Aikido helps calm me though, maybe its the movements, maybe its the fact Jui Jitsu seems more brutal and perhaps the moves in Aikido take abit more time to learn? We did weapons training with bokken the other day and although I dont see that as useful in a self defence context I found it useful just in the fact it was enjoyable and I enjoyed the movements and defences with the bokken.

lbb
02-13-2013, 01:19 PM
I've held off from replying to this because I don't have depression, and so don't have your personal experience. I'm also not a clinician. You asked, though, about using anti-depressants, and that made me remember the tail-end of a talk by Pema Chodron (it's on one of her audiobooks). In response to a question where a participant wanted to stop using medication, Ani Pema said, During the Q&A session, one participant said that she had clinical depression and was hopeful that she could stop using antidepressants if she got her meditation practice working right. Ani Pema said, basically, that while practices like meditation can be helpful, and might allow some people to go off their meds, for some people, medication is needed to temper the effects of the condition, and that's just a part of the life that you have. The important point is that for many people, medication mediates the condition enough that they can proceed, can get on with life, and can be in a position where practices such as meditation (or aikido, or walks in the woods, or whatever) can do some good. So, in her view, it's not an either-or thing.

I also found another article in the Shambhala Sun (here ("http://www.shambhalasun.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1753&Itemid=244)) by a woman who attempted to deal with depression purely through meditation and spiritual practices, and was not successful until she added antidepressants into her suite of tools. It's a pretty hard read; she describes the depths of her depression with great honesty. But it's also beautiful and full of wisdom:

"There's a saying in Zen that "inquiry and response come up together." Perhaps that's what prayer is. To make an inquiry is already to get a response, because asking implies that there's something else there. And there's not even a time lag. The moment you're asking for help, you're already getting it, though it may not be the help you thought you wanted. Once, when I called Zen teacher Reb Anderson in despair, he came to Berkeley to see me. We sat on a park bench in a playground, and he told me, "The universe is already taking care of you." I said this mantra to myself over and over: "The universe is already taking care of me.""

Best of luck to you,

soupdragon1973
02-14-2013, 04:18 AM
thanks lbb

KEM
02-14-2013, 11:36 PM
If the anti-depressents help keep taking them. No one suggests that a person with blood pressure problems stop taking their medicine to train aikido. If the blood pressure improves and the medication can be reduced great (under appropriate advise). If not...it is about chemistry, not character. You are showing the depth of your character by doing Aikido and by sharing your experience publicly in this forum.

soupdragon1973
02-17-2013, 09:51 AM
thanks KEM. I should perhaps explain abit better why I asked this question.

Last Sept I signed up with a 'Mcdojo'. Not in Aikido but it was supposedly mixed martial arts they were selling. When I went for my induction the instructor was asking me lots of questions before I signed up and one of them was 'am I on any medication'. I answered yes and then was told 'we try to encourage our students to come off medication'. Now I rushed myself to rid myself of any medication within a short time which did me no good what-so-ever. I understand this instructors attitude was reckless and ill-informed to say the least.

I have since distanced myself from said Mcdojo and took up Aikido instead. Further to add my Sensei's at the dojo where I take Aikido have never asked me such questions about medications I take.

sakumeikan
02-18-2013, 01:52 AM
thanks KEM. I should perhaps explain abit better why I asked this question.

Last Sept I signed up with a 'Mcdojo'. Not in Aikido but it was supposedly mixed martial arts they were selling. When I went for my induction the instructor was asking me lots of questions before I signed up and one of them was 'am I on any medication'. I answered yes and then was told 'we try to encourage our students to come off medication'. Now I rushed myself to rid myself of any medication within a short time which did me no good what-so-ever. I understand this instructors attitude was reckless and ill-informed to say the least.

I have since distanced myself from said Mcdojo and took up Aikido instead. Further to add my Sensei's at the dojo where I take Aikido have never asked me such questions about medications I take.

Dear Alex,
Perhaps it would be wise to mention that you are on medication to your new sensei?Just a quiet word should suffice.Do not stop any medical treatment that you are on unless advised by your own doctor.Take care , Joe.

soupdragon1973
02-18-2013, 02:41 AM
yes that might be a good idea. Just didnt want to rush into telling anyone, not there at least as I didnt want to feel any pressure regarding this. Thanks Joe.

graham christian
02-18-2013, 05:33 PM
yes that might be a good idea. Just didnt want to rush into telling anyone, not there at least as I didnt want to feel any pressure regarding this. Thanks Joe.

Not might be Alex, come on, it's your responsibility to. By not doing so you will be the one feeling the pressure.....on yourself.

First step...be open.

Peace.G.

Janet Rosen
02-18-2013, 05:48 PM
....the nurse says...there is no need or reason to tell the instructor. This medicine has no side effects that will affect the OP's training. Patient privacy should only be waived when it matters.

graham christian
02-18-2013, 05:56 PM
A medical drug with no side effects? That's a first. Come on now.

Michael Hackett
02-18-2013, 06:32 PM
That wasn't what she said Graham. She said the drug would have no side effects that would affect his training. Everything we ingest has side effects to some degree or another and may have some affect on our activities. Janet was clear that an antidepressant would not present side effects to the detriment of aikido training. Two very different things.

graham christian
02-18-2013, 06:53 PM
That wasn't what she said Graham. She said the drug would have no side effects that would affect his training. Everything we ingest has side effects to some degree or another and may have some affect on our activities. Janet was clear that an antidepressant would not present side effects to the detriment of aikido training. Two very different things.

I stand corrected......slightly.

Firstly my point was to be open, both with Doctor and teacher. Secondly I disagree with side effects that won't affect training thus they should be known.

Don't give me that 'anything ingested has side effects' line please. We are talking medication and there are specific side effects which will affect training. It is responsibility which leads to thus doing the training with no adverse effects not hiding things.

So you are right saying I took it as side effects but wrong if you think they wouldn't affect training or shouldn't be mentioned.

Peace.G.

lbb
02-18-2013, 08:46 PM
There's being open, then there's egregious TMI violations. There's need to know, and there's getting in someone's business. It's important to know the difference.

What's magical about the word "medication" anyway? We need to tell our instructors about everything we take that's called "medication", but don't need to tell them about anything else? That doesn't make any sense. Alcohol isn't called a "medication", but it has an effect that's much more relevant to training than aspirin, which IS a "medication". You can choose to follow a rule that you've made up based on a label, or you can use common sense. Your choice.

Janet Rosen
02-18-2013, 10:14 PM
There is no need for aikido instructors to know most of the meds people take. Thyroid? Laxative? Diuretic? Antidiuretic? Heck, what qualifications does an aikido instructor even have in order to make any meaningful evaluation of this, much less have it be relevent to the training. Employers don't need to know, why do aikido instructors?
Things I would consider highly relevent would include
"I have a heart condition and take a drug that regulates my pulse rate. My doctor has cleared me for all forms of exercise and I can provide you with his name and number if you have any concerns...I haven't actually had any symptoms in two years but want to let you know and I do carry emergency nitro just in case of chest pain."
"I'm a diabetic. Sometimes I may need to go off the mat to check my blood sugar. Is there a dojo emergency kit in which I can leave some sugar tablets just in case? Do you have any questions or concerns about my training?"

Malicat
02-18-2013, 10:48 PM
There's being open, then there's egregious TMI violations. There's need to know, and there's getting in someone's business. It's important to know the difference.

What's magical about the word "medication" anyway? We need to tell our instructors about everything we take that's called "medication", but don't need to tell them about anything else? That doesn't make any sense. Alcohol isn't called a "medication", but it has an effect that's much more relevant to training than aspirin, which IS a "medication". You can choose to follow a rule that you've made up based on a label, or you can use common sense. Your choice.

I feel the need to be open about my need to go out for a beer occasionally after Aikido class... generally with the instructor as well as the other students. This seems like a good way to let him know about my alcohol use! :)

Seriously though, Mary and Janet are absolutely correct and said everything that needs to be said.

--Ashley

Michael Hackett
02-19-2013, 12:28 AM
Graham, I don't know the side effects of any medication that I haven't taken, given to my children or witnessed another family member taking. I relied on Janet's opinion, knowing that she is a licensed and experienced RN in California, had to have extensive training, underwent demanding testing and continues to be required to undergo continuing education courses to maintain her licensure. The opinion of a qualified and experienced medical professional carries far more weight with me on this subject than the opinion of a layman. I would give more weight to your opinion relating to any field in which you are an expert as well.

soupdragon1973
02-19-2013, 08:10 AM
sorry I didnt mean to start a thread war. I asked here first to get some input. Yes I agree I should tell my instructor if said medication was making me drowsy or slow but if that was the case I wouldnt even be bothering to turn up at dojo. As it is my medication doesnt make me drowsy at all during my time at dojo and as I mentioned earlier my focus is fine, just as it would be normally.

The reason I also asked as the first place I went to (not an Aikido dojo) emphasized me coming off medication altogether. Was that wise to encourage any student to do that? And why,why did it matter so much to that instuctor or particular dojo? The only reason I paid any attention to this instructor was the fact he also told me he was an A+E nurse. In retrospect I think what he said was reckless and ill-informed and that pressure should not have been put on me in first place. But as I said, that dojo was not an Aikido dojo.

lbb
02-19-2013, 08:55 AM
The reason I also asked as the first place I went to (not an Aikido dojo) emphasized me coming off medication altogether. Was that wise to encourage any student to do that? And why,why did it matter so much to that instuctor or particular dojo? The only reason I paid any attention to this instructor was the fact he also told me he was an A+E nurse. In retrospect I think what he said was reckless and ill-informed and that pressure should not have been put on me in first place. But as I said, that dojo was not an Aikido dojo.

This is a bit of a blind guess, but here in the US, many martial arts schools promote their teachings as not only promoting fitness and enabling you to protect yourself from Crack-Crazed Urban Street Scum(tm,), but also as a comprehensive self-help program that reduces stress and improves mental focus and promotes self-control and yahda yahda yahda. It's all a large steaming pile of manure, but the public is uninformed and many are gullible as well, and so it succeeds in pulling in students. As part of this whole self-help claptrap, some schools get in their students' business to some degree, particularly in kids' programs - for example, requiring kids to bring in their report card. One wonders exactly what they'll do if the kids' grades are unsatisfactory. People who are tired or lazy or overwhelmed or at a loss as to how to make things better in their lives (or their kids'), are ready to hand it over to someone else. Never mind that common sense says you gotta do it yourself. This "encouraging students to get off medication" may be of a piece with that, or it may just be some individual quirk of the instructor, who knows? I suppose it doesn't really matter why. It's silly and inappropriate.

soupdragon1973
02-19-2013, 09:52 AM
Thanks Mary. Yes indeed, said dojo was what has been described to me as "belt factory", called itself a "black belt academy". Overpriced contracts, multiple belts at considerable cost etc. I was gullible yes, I took it up as they were handing out leaflets near a supermarket, I got a call from them a few weeks later and I went for my 'free lesson' because I thought doing martial arts would help me with my stress levels. It didnt. Not at said dojo anyways. I feel I was sold martial arts as a way to deal with so much. Gullible suckers like myself get sucked in. Thankfully I got out after 4 months having realised after a month or two that I was being ripped off. Yes, the encouragement to come off medication was rash. I came off my anti-depressants quickly to find I had insomnia and awful mood swings. After 2 weeks I went back on them and my feeling was "its none of their business anymore" especially as there was no follow up to see if I was doing well or ok mentally without my anti-depressants.

I believe the word is "Mcdojo". Yes we have them in UK also. Martial arts as business first and foremost. I got out of there after Christmas(would have left earlier but was paying 100 a month) and havent looked back. The belts I paid 40 each for are worthless and should be thrown away. I came to Aikido with a fresh mindset to begin and learn a-new.

graham christian
02-19-2013, 10:30 AM
I never cease to be amazed. Common sense indeed.

Alex, I see you have agreed already to tell your instructor. Nice to hear. Well done.

The fact that you took the advice of your past one is interesting. He was also a person with pieces of paper ie: qualifications. Sounds like also medically trained. Yet his advice was not so good. Just goes to show that if you assume because someones got the label that they are to be followed blindly then the results can be not as expected.

Peoples awareness of side effects of drugs, (yes, drugs for those above who misunderstand my use of the word medication) is unfortunately very low thus they just trust what they are told.

In this day and age especially it is common sense for any instructor to be aware of the effects of medical and any other drugs and also may I add the effects during training, the little flags to watch out for.

Otherwise you get such views as 'you just gotta get off them' or at the other extreme 'Don't worry it won't affect anything'.

Common sense says be aware of the potential difficulties and manage them. That's common sense.

You are aware already of symptoms of your particular condition and also aware of when it feels like they are being triggered or 'coming on' no? Well if any part of the training triggers such it is obvious that the instructor should be made aware of the fact or else he will assume something else and make it worse.

When it comes to drugs it is not a matter of 'no inhibiting or detrimental side effects' it is a matter of finding out what they are, when they are and what to do when they are.

Keeping it real. Way to go.

Peace.G.

soupdragon1973
02-19-2013, 10:41 AM
I should hasten to add, said Mcdojo did encourage me to give up my 25 a day smoking habit, so it wasnt all bad. I then took up swimming and then moved onto jogging, I did a 6 mile run yesterday for the first time. So not all bad advice from them.

soupdragon1973
02-19-2013, 10:58 AM
Graham; aware of my symptoms of my condition? You mean the medication I take or my depression or both? Yes I am, very aware. If anything I am somebody with a sensitivity to all drugs and medications and not overly keen on taking them anyways.

This current one I take, I have not had too bad side effects with and they have more or less dissapeared now altogether. Others anti-depressants I have had bad reactions too and stopped taking within a few days of useage. I take a low dose of this anti-depressant before I go to bed. I did find it made me drowsy or sluggish at one time during the first month but that has long since worn off. If I felt sluggish like I did there would be no way I would go to any dojo let alone Aikido. I do hope as we move into spring and then summer it might be time to wean myself off the medication albiet slowly this time and not rushed.

Regarding my depression, I actually find it very useful to go to Aikido for the focus it gives my mind if I am feeling depressed. I soon stop dwelling on negative feelings and focus instead on what I need to be doing in the dojo. Hence I said earlier that any kind of focused activity could be short-term beneficial to depression. Just wondered if it had helped anyone else. It could easily be knitting, baking a cake or making an Airfix model (thats one of those plastic scale model kits that you glue together and then paint to those of you not in UK)

graham christian
02-19-2013, 11:33 AM
Yes Alex, sounds great. Sounds like you are indeed managing it well. I find myself admiring your progress..well done indeed.

As you so rightly put it 'gradually weaning yourself off of them' way to go!

Glad to see you find Aikido helps too in that process for I know it does. The concentration, the focus, excellent.

So yes I have heard of many times Aikido has helped with others doing similar to you now, I have also witnessed it.

I remember also only last year reading about or hearing about, can't remember which one, someone who suffered deep states of depression and suddenly had an idea. The idea was what could they do when in that state. They decided they would paint. They would use it, utilize it and found that was great therapy.

Now the reason that particular story stuck with me is because a great friend of mine did the same and that was not only her therapy but her eventual cure.

My friend who does Aikido was actually invited to show and demonstrate the benefits of using Aikido principles to help people with depression and various other 'mental ailments' quite recently.

So believe it or not practicing 'one point' helps all those conditions. Now take that into life and we have what you have have already discovered for yourself....focusing on one activity which you enjoy helps immensely.

Peace.G.

sakumeikan
02-19-2013, 11:41 AM
I should hasten to add, said Mcdojo did encourage me to give up my 25 a day smoking habit, so it wasnt all bad. I then took up swimming and then moved onto jogging, I did a 6 mile run yesterday for the first time. So not all bad advice from them.

Dear Alex,
For the princely sum of 400.00 I will willingly give you advice on any subject you care to mention.i think the place you went to saw you coming. You must have more money than common sense. Cheers, Joe.

lbb
02-19-2013, 12:02 PM
I always wonder about the term "wean one self off" something. Weaning is, of course, the process by which a young animal ceases being dependent on its mother's milk and moves to an adult diet. Infancy is a developmental stage; weaning is a normal transition that is part of leaving the developmental stage of infancy behind. A medical condition is not a developmental stage. It may resolve itself at some point, or it may be with you always in some form. In either case, it's here now, and you need to live with it and manage it. Antidepressants may not always be necessary for that, but if you want to use the flawed analogy of "weaning" yourself off them, please remember that an infant is only weaned when it is able to accept a different diet and live a healthy and functional life.

Janet Rosen
02-19-2013, 01:34 PM
Mary, very good post.
From a physiological point of view there are a few classes of meds that require a planned taper to come off of (two classes that come to mind are corticosteroids like prednisone, because the adrenal glands shut down production while on large doses and need time to respond to incremental decreases by slowly ramping up output, and opiates, which create physical dependence over longterm use and are most safely and comfortably stopped by taper - here talking not of addiction but simple physical dependence).
Most meds, yep, you take them or you don't. Sometimes a decreased dosage may provide therapeutic response, but just taking a subtherapeutic dose is a waste of money and leaves one open to risks of side effects without garnering a benefit.

soupdragon1973
02-19-2013, 02:50 PM
ok Mary, sorry I should have said taper. I used the word wean as that was all I could think of

soupdragon1973
02-19-2013, 02:58 PM
ok Mary, sorry I should have said taper instead. I used the word wean as that was all I could think of.

Janet, if I was to come off anti-depressants quickly and abruptly it would result in a rebound effect such as insomnia and mood swings. I know as I did it last year.

Joe, no I dont have much money but dont understand the insult but thanks anyways. There are people there who stayed on to do a 'leadership' programme which cost 4000 quid over 3 years. I got out of there as fast I could do after quickly realising I had been conned. I didnt know diddly squat about martial arts, probably like most people who join these kind of places, so therefore it was easy for them to sell me what they offer at a vastly overpriced sum. There are and were many members there,kids and adults alike who were on their 'leadership' bullshit. I am just glad I am away from them now, it was a costly mistake but thats all it was.

soupdragon1973
02-19-2013, 03:13 PM
further to add, I have been on these a year now. Its time to come off them, Aikido or no Aikido. I dont want to become dependent upon them. My question was this; is it against dojo ethics to train while using a legal drug/medication such as an anti-depressant. I think its safe to say it is ok, so long as said medication isnt affecting my concentration, focus or physical well being in a negative way. Thanks for all your input. I dont feel welcome here, some people are genuinelt kind and some are just downright rude. I guess Aikido doesnt teach social tact haha! Peace

Michael Hackett
02-19-2013, 06:03 PM
Alex, you received the answers to your original question in the first couple of replies concerning the ethics of training while medicated. Aikido teaches only aikido and doesn't substitute for any other social convention. Ignore those who offend you and interact with those you find helpful. Both kinds can be found on AikiWeb - "The pleasure is worth the pain." to quote Jimmy Buffet.

sakumeikan
02-19-2013, 06:28 PM
ok Mary, sorry I should have said taper instead. I used the word wean as that was all I could think of.

Janet, if I was to come off anti-depressants quickly and abruptly it would result in a rebound effect such as insomnia and mood swings. I know as I did it last year.

Joe, no I dont have much money but dont understand the insult but thanks anyways. There are people there who stayed on to do a 'leadership' programme which cost 4000 quid over 3 years. I got out of there as fast I could do after quickly realising I had been conned. I didnt know diddly squat about martial arts, probably like most people who join these kind of places, so therefore it was easy for them to sell me what they offer at a vastly overpriced sum. There are and were many members there,kids and adults alike who were on their 'leadership' bullshit. I am just glad I am away from them now, it was a costly mistake but thats all it was.
Dear Alex,
No insult was meant .What I was suggesting is that you were taken by the dojo you joined.You did finally realise the place was mugging you. it happens not just to you , we all get caught by somebody and when this happens , the common phrase is, Huh, you must have had more cash than sense.
It pays you to do research on anything to ensure you do not get taken for a mug.Would you buy a car/washing machine without checking the make or how reliable the item is?I think not, so tell me,
why do people such as you and the guys who paid 4000 quid for crap certificates. get fleeced?For 4 grand I might be able to get you a seat in the House of Commons.Just cross my palm with dosh and I will check with Mr Clegg/Cameron.Mind you if I do not succeed, no monies refunded.Cheers, Joe.

Janet Rosen
02-20-2013, 01:01 AM
further to add, I have been on these a year now. Its time to come off them, Aikido or no Aikido. I dont want to become dependent upon them. My question was this; is it against dojo ethics to train while using a legal drug/medication such as an anti-depressant. I think its safe to say it is ok, so long as said medication isnt affecting my concentration, focus or physical well being in a negative way. Thanks for all your input. I dont feel welcome here, some people are genuinelt kind and some are just downright rude. I guess Aikido doesnt teach social tact haha! Peace

Alex, I certainly hope you didn't find my posts rude. I was not criticizing your desire or need to do a taper; I was providing context that I thought might be helpful not necesarily to you but to others participating in this thread. This is an internet forum; there will be some thread drift and differences of opinion but frankly I never found anybody's tone on this thread objectionable. Maybe everybody isnt' all touchy feely sweetness and light but that's not who everybody is. As in life, we are here, all of us warts and all, doing the best we can.

sakumeikan
02-20-2013, 02:10 AM
Dear Alex,
If by chance you found my comments a bit rude /hurtful I apologise.If i were not interested or had little concern for you and your issues I would not take time and effort to post on this Forum. As a parent I know at first hand how badly depression can affect people. Changes in mood, warped irrational behaviour/thinking etc all can come into force.It would appear to me that if you are a type of person who is inclined towards depressive states you have one hell of a battle to maintain /balance your life.Depression can make you commit suicide, ruin your relationships , ruin you career and you have to learn to live with it. Its almost akin to an alcoholic, drug user or anybody with an addiction.So dear Alex, do not think I am being rude or making any comments to upset you .As I sted earlier I admire your courage in addressing your issues. Take care , Joe.

john2054
01-13-2014, 04:40 PM
Hi Alex, how are you doing now? Are you still with us? Me i have also had battles with mental illness, this time paranoid schizophrenia, so i also know the nuisance taking a regular typical/atypical psytropical dose can have on you. But stick with it. Try to socialise with new people, go to aikido class if you feel up to it? And how about further education? All of these are very positive ways of looking forwards instead of back, okay? John