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lbb
06-21-2012, 11:33 AM
It is wicked hot in Massachusetts today, and tonight I'll be going to the dojo. I'll be doing it all summer long. Some people take the summer off -- they spend part of it vacationing elsewhere, or their schedule gets disrupted by other things, they get out of the routine, and they stop coming. But I've always enjoyed training during the summer. I like the adversity of the heat, the quiet time without a lot of other events going on. Summer camp is over, there probably won't be any tests until sometime in the fall, and I'm looking forward to a long stretch of time to just train. In the fall, the people who took the summer off will come back, and I'll be glad (again) that I didn't take time off.

What about you? Do you like training in the summer? Hate it? Endure it? Do you feel like you make more progress, less progress, what?

Janet Rosen
06-21-2012, 11:50 AM
It gets 95-105 a fair number of days here, but it is dry, which helps, and our dojo has a good swamp cooler, which really helps...but the main thing for me is it gives a great excuse to slow down, slow down, refine things....

JO
06-21-2012, 11:55 AM
I never stop my training if I can help it. I just wish more people showed up in the summer. Our main problem isn't the heat, it's that few people want to go into the basement of the sports complex on a nice summer day and most of our students are university students that take off for the summer.

chillzATL
06-21-2012, 12:47 PM
I don't mind it. I like working outside and getting a good sweat going. In our org, anyone who gets promoted to shodan has to deal with it. Shodan and up advancements only happen at gasshuku which takes place at a rustic campground in the mountains of Sc. Cabins with gaps under the door large enough for a possum to get through, plate sized spiders, 6+ hours of training per day, 100+ temps in the dojo, testing and no a/c, anywhere, for seven days. Fun times!

Dave Gallagher
06-21-2012, 01:52 PM
In the mid 1970's I trained in JKA Shotokan Karate. The summers here in St.Louis can have weeks on end of temps in the 95+ range. The dojo windows would not open and only a front and back door to open during class. A couple of those small square fans moved a bit of air. We trained three days a week and it all seemed normal to us. After Saturday class at noon we would go across the street to Lavin's Irish pub and drink beer all afternoon. No one ever got up to use the restroom. Our bodies seemed to absorb it all to replace what we lost in class.
When I began Aikido in the 90's the old Shobukan dojo with Dave Lowry teaching, was in a converted two car carrage house and only a side door to open. No air to circulate and it remains in my mind as the best Aikido dojo ever. The heat of summer or the cold of winter seem natural to me.
As I prepare to return to aikido training I expect it to be hot in the Aikikai dojo. At the age of 62 I may slow down but not complain. I've been through it before.

Mary Eastland
06-21-2012, 02:20 PM
I Ilke to train in the heat but as I get older I have to be more careful. I need to drink enough water and rest before I feel exhausted.

JJF
06-21-2012, 03:54 PM
Weather will seldom keep us from training around these parts, so we keep it up all around the year. I have to talk the odd week off now and then - like for going away on holiday - but if I get a chance I make it so that I can go teach. If not - I'll try and find a stand-in, or I suggest my students should practice on their own. Aikido is never out of season :)

Shadowfax
06-21-2012, 03:58 PM
I never miss a class... ever.

Fortunately our dojo is air conditioned. If it were not, I still would not miss a class.

Rob Watson
06-21-2012, 05:03 PM
Morning class (before the sun gets things too hot) is great. Fortunately 'round these parts summer is quite mild - 65F today with fog bank and forecast for even lower temps the next couple of days.

Y'all are crazy to live in places where it gets hot enough to kill you ...

Dave Gallagher
06-21-2012, 05:26 PM
In my post above I used the term "Aikikai dojo" I meant Aikido dojo. Sorry, my mind is not as good as it used to be and also my mind is not as good as it used to be.lol

Walter Martindale
06-21-2012, 06:08 PM
In my post above I used the term "Aikikai dojo" I meant Aikido dojo. Sorry, my mind is not as good as it used to be and also my mind is not as good as it used to be.lol

was it the heat speaking?;)

We ("golden horseshoe" area just outside of Toronto) had temperatures in the "feels like" 41C when the humidity and temperature were taken into account. (body temp is 37C 98.6F if the C scale confuses).
Rowing in that with the sun bouncing off the water as well as hitting you from above is very hot - we limit the duration of the session when it gets that hot.

Adam Huss
06-21-2012, 10:18 PM
I love inclement weather training. Mostly because I hate being uncomfortable and I hate things that I am uncomfortable with.

Anthony Loeppert
06-21-2012, 10:20 PM
I love inclement weather training. Mostly because I hate being uncomfortable and I hate things that I am uncomfortable with.

I see what you did there :)

Not me though.... I sweat like a maniac in nice San Diego conditions...

Eva Antonia
06-22-2012, 03:33 AM
Hello,

here in Belgium most dojos close during the summer vacation (01 July - 31 August), not because of the heat but because too many people go away. But there is the Tissier summer camp as compensation for those who stay.
I am going to Istanbul, every summer during the great vacations, and I'm training over there. I don't think the heat really matters. Once you started training you'll sweat anyway, and then you won't feel the heat any more. At least that's it for me. I don't have the impression that training in Istanbul is less dynamic at 39 C Celsius....I'm already looking forward to it!

All the best,

Eva

Dazzler
06-22-2012, 04:03 AM
This is England...we don't do summer :(

Basia Halliop
06-22-2012, 08:22 AM
I'd far rather practice in cooler weather, but I still learn stuff when it's hot and humid, including how to deal with heat and humidity. And I do like the conditioning I seem to get from it (if I can manage not to kill myself or make myself sick, I mean)-- the rest of the day doesn't feel as hot, and I love the extra energy that comes when you've been training lately someplace awfully hot then go to a seminar where they have air conditioning or when suddenly there's a cooler day.

"Once you started training you'll sweat anyway, and then you won't feel the heat any more. "

I haven't found this to be the case at all, but then where I live heat almost always comes with a lot of humidity. The humidity feels much worse than the heat itself, because your sweat doesn't evaporate and cool you off, it just sits there. To me it kinds of feel like you're getting steamed to death, IMO.

Cliff Judge
06-22-2012, 09:36 AM
Summer is a VERY challenging time to go on a diet of no beer.

That's my thought.

Dave Gallagher
06-22-2012, 01:27 PM
As I think about it, hot summer training is far better than a winter time dojo with little or no heat. As a senior citizen my body is stiff and hard to limber up and the mats are hard as hell in the cold.
Perhaps the sweat of the heat is better.

Janet Rosen
06-22-2012, 04:02 PM
As I think about it, hot summer training is far better than a winter time dojo with little or no heat. As a senior citizen my body is stiff and hard to limber up and the mats are hard as hell in the cold.
Perhaps the sweat of the heat is better.

Yep, even when it's technically "cool" out I wear leggings and long sleeves under my gi to keep joints warm

ken king
06-25-2012, 10:36 AM
I guess I'm spoiled, but the AC in the dojo went out this weekend and it was pretty horrid.

ken king
06-25-2012, 11:07 AM
There are advantages to training in the heat. It makes you think about slippery wrists, wet clothing, sweat stinging your eyes, breath control, and the importance of hydration. Also it makes it very apparent who doesn't take personal hygeine very seriously in the dojo(stinky people!)

phitruong
06-25-2012, 11:24 AM
just need to wear less clothing in the summer. no clothing would be preferable over thong. :)

Mark Freeman
06-25-2012, 11:47 AM
This is England...we don't do summer :(

I am feeling right at home here in Seattle, it's rained here every day so far.

I'm going to start heading south pretty soon, I've almost forgotten what the sun looks like.

Dave Gallagher
06-27-2012, 12:56 PM
I hope to resume my training in the dojo with no AC on Tuesday. The forecast for that day is 99. It could be worse tomorrow it's 105.
At the age of 62I must be out of my mind.

phitruong
06-27-2012, 02:16 PM
I hope to resume my training in the dojo with no AC on Tuesday. The forecast for that day is 99. It could be worse tomorrow it's 105.
At the age of 62I must be out of my mind.

you could practice aikido in a pool. i have done that before. it's kinda fun as long as you don't pin. :)

Graham Farquhar
06-27-2012, 04:42 PM
I am feeling right at home here in Seattle, it's rained here every day so far.

I'm going to start heading south pretty soon, I've almost forgotten what the sun looks like.

And how are you enjoying your journey Mark? Have you stopped by Sensei Ledyard's dojo?:ki:

amoeba
07-01-2012, 09:59 AM
I remember one seminar with Endo sensei in Germany, 35 C outside, on the tatami I wouldn't even want to guess. It was crowded as always, the windows didn't open and the A/C didn't help at all, really.
I didn't stop training but it was very, very uncomfortable. And there were three water breaks in the final two hours.

At home, we don't have A/C at all, but a nice, big garage door that we can (and normally do) open when it's warm and dry. So far, it was always okay.

I wouldn't think about "taking the summer off" (unless I go on non-Aikido holiday, then it's fine...), but then I guess summers here in Germany are pretty harmless, anyway...