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Jeremy Hulley
06-21-2012, 11:25 AM
So I'm curious:

Who is out there training IS/IP?

Why are you still training IS/IP and what impact has it had on your training?

I'm still working on it even after a frustrating two days with Dan this week. That would be my frustration with myself..

I'm still working it because even at my low level I'm seeing clear benefits in my training including increase stability and more power with much less effort.

If I open my body correctly and express ten chi jin I am already under my opponent. This is true with weapons and with empty hand.

Thanks for your thoughts
Jeremy

Marc Abrams
06-21-2012, 11:46 AM
So I'm curious:

Who is out there training IS/IP?

Why are you still training IS/IP and what impact has it had on your training?

I'm still working on it even after a frustrating two days with Dan this week. That would be my frustration with myself..

I'm still working it because even at my low level I'm seeing clear benefits in my training including increase stability and more power with much less effort.

If I open my body correctly and express ten chi jin I am already under my opponent. This is true with weapons and with empty hand.

Thanks for your thoughts
Jeremy

Jeremy:

July 2010 (I think) was when I first had the opportunity to train with Dan Harden. I work on this stuff every day, always integrating it in how I train and teach the stuff I do. The changes have been remarkable in the advances that I am making. The other remarkable thing is how it helps me better understand what my other teachers are really doing so that I can actually make better use of their teachings! The really good news is I STILL SUCK :D :D :D ! and don't blame Dan.....

Keep up the hard work, the changes will be subtle and profound!

Regards,

Marc Abrams

woudew
06-21-2012, 12:01 PM
We are training IP/IS and aiki.

Actually it is more or less all we do nowadays. But then again we are lucky to have the solo exercises from Shirata Sensei (they are called Tan doku dosa by the Way) and these exercise are built to train IP/IS and aiki.

I totally sympathize with you on the frustration part. How recognizable.

chillzATL
06-21-2012, 12:29 PM
I am.

I enjoy it. It's neat to use your body that way and feel what's going on in my body on that level, both on and off the mat. I can't see myself ever going back to using my body the old way again. For one, it's practically fixed back problems that I've had since I was a teenager.

It's increased the depth and understanding of what I'm doing aikido-wise tremendously. I'm definitely more stable, harder to move, more connected and stronger when doing aikido than before, for whatever that's worth. It's made me, at times, desire a greater level of active resistance, just to see how well I can hold it together, but I accept that this level is not what aikido is about. On the other side it's almost completely ruined by view of techniques or at least the endless repetition of techniques and the whole "your hand goes here, your foot goes there" way of doing them, if that makes sense.

ChrisMoses
06-21-2012, 01:07 PM
So I'm curious:

Who is out there training IS/IP?

Why are you still training IS/IP and what impact has it had on your training?



If I stopped now, I'd NEVER throw you... :drool:

Jeremy Hulley
06-21-2012, 01:10 PM
If I stopped now, I'd NEVER throw you... :drool:
:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

Mary Eastland
06-21-2012, 03:10 PM
I am not sure how you are defining IS/IP. Our training has always been and will continue to be dedicated to developing Ki.

ChrisMoses
06-21-2012, 03:34 PM
I am not sure how you are defining IS/IP. Our training has always been and will continue to be dedicated to developing Ki.

Dan/Ark/Mike/SamChin/etc..

Not talking about Aikido necessarily, certainly not talking about the 'traditional' methods used by 99% of Aikido groups.

mathewjgano
06-21-2012, 04:48 PM
To whatever extent I've been able to work on it, I am doing so...which I guess is obvious in retrospect, lol. I'm trying.

...Oops; why?
I want to maximize my understanding of how the body works. I want to have as full an understanding of myself as possible so I may be the best I can be.

Steve Sakahara
06-21-2012, 05:13 PM
To throw people I couldn't throw before while making it difficult for them to throw me. Without training techniques.

To get stronger, healthier and faster as I get older. Right Gary? No more back issues here either.

To share with some very smart and dedicated people who go out of their way to help you get better.

To train with people personally and globally via the internet who open their minds and decide from hands on experience the value this stuff. There's a depth of forging you can recognize and acknowledge. There is a filtering process.

To learn something so simple in concept, yet so damn hard to learn. Failure is a constant. And I'm not talking about a blown technique. I'm talking about a second by second failure within solo training. Day, after day, after day...

To look at my own crap with depth, perseverance, forgiveness and wisdom. It's not about dancing and philosophical discussion. See above.

To see wtf in uke.

To have some hope of throwing Jeremy and Chris. Did I mention to get sneakier? :D

gregstec
06-21-2012, 06:34 PM
I am not sure how you are defining IS/IP. Our training has always been and will continue to be dedicated to developing Ki.

Although the understanding and use of ki is integral to effective development of IS/IP, it is not the only thing required to develop IS/IP. Actually, ki is just part of the process that leads all movement; external as well as internal. In IS/IP development the conscious leading of ki with your intent is a core part of re-mapping the normal external movements to internal movements for a given response.

Greg

Gary David
06-21-2012, 06:47 PM
To get stronger, healthier and faster as I get older. Right Gary?



Well Steve I have found out in the past few weeks that as I have grown older I have become twisted, that I miss the point or points, I lack understanding, I am selfish, I am all ego and a bunch other things........ to wit the 38 years I have spent has all been for nothing..whistling in dark or pi&xing in the wind......and I run with a bad crowd.........and and I don't have a clue about love...local, personal or universal.....

Still.... I think I will just keep moving along........

As for the training I'll just keep trying to incorporate what we have been shown into my movements in daily life.....it is working for me. I'll include what I can into what I help to pass on to the folks that have given me respect and to whom I return that respect.

keep after it...

Gary

Anthony Loeppert
06-21-2012, 07:10 PM
As for the training I'll just keep trying to incorporate what we have been shown into my movements in daily life.....it is working for me. I'll include what I can into what I help to pass on to the folks that have given me respect and to whom I return that respect.

keep after it...

Gary

Dear sir,
Having read several of your posts scattered across the site, I'm ready to sign up for your newsletter.
Perhaps our paths will cross some time as San Diego isn't so far from long beach.

Take care,
Anthony

Carsten Möllering
06-22-2012, 03:24 AM
Our training has always been and will continue to be dedicated to developing Ki.
... understanding and use of ki is integral to effective development of IS/IP ...

Even before I learned about IS in the way "Dan/Ark/Mike/SamChin/etc.." practice it, I experienced a difference not only in the understanding of the term Ki/ki/qi but also in the practical "use" of the phenomenon, a difference between people stemming from the Shin shin toitsu do of Tohei sensei and people stemming from chinese arts.
The "chinese" usage of the word was much more nuanced, differentiated. And regarding the "practice of qi" it was much more concrete, definite.
(This last way of understanding and "using" ki was what shaped my personal practice more than the other. And I think that was helpfull to stumble into Dan's way of internal training. For it does fit to what I learned "around" Tissier or "near" Endo or with my teacher here and his a step further on that way.)

I am really not sure, wether my personal experiences are to generalize. But when talking with friends, who do Ki-Aikido, about "ki" we often get to a point where we realize that what we call "ki" is something different. One time I even had to accept the answer that what is called "qi" in my books about qi gong is something fundamentally different from what is called "Ki" in Toheis work. Also it is clear for my friends that the "one point" is clearly not the seika tanden. For the one point can be outside of teh body. e.g. when doing falls. The seika tanden on the other hand has to be inside of the body.

Again: I don't know how my experiences fit to yours.

But what do you think: Is it possible that we don't only talk about different ways to "deal with" Ki/ki/qi, but that we understand this phenomenon itself in a fundamentally different way?

gregstec
06-22-2012, 07:30 AM
Even before I learned about IS in the way "Dan/Ark/Mike/SamChin/etc.." practice it, I experienced a difference not only in the understanding of the term Ki/ki/qi but also in the practical "use" of the phenomenon, a difference between people stemming from the Shin shin toitsu do of Tohei sensei and people stemming from chinese arts.
The "chinese" usage of the word was much more nuanced, differentiated. And regarding the "practice of qi" it was much more concrete, definite.
(This last way of understanding and "using" ki was what shaped my personal practice more than the other. And I think that was helpfull to stumble into Dan's way of internal training. For it does fit to what I learned "around" Tissier or "near" Endo or with my teacher here and his a step further on that way.)

I am really not sure, wether my personal experiences are to generalize. But when talking with friends, who do Ki-Aikido, about "ki" we often get to a point where we realize that what we call "ki" is something different. One time I even had to accept the answer that what is called "qi" in my books about qi gong is something fundamentally different from what is called "Ki" in Toheis work. Also it is clear for my friends that the "one point" is clearly not the seika tanden. For the one point can be outside of teh body. e.g. when doing falls. The seika tanden on the other hand has to be inside of the body.

Again: I don't know how my experiences fit to yours.

But what do you think: Is it possible that we don't only talk about different ways to "deal with" Ki/ki/qi, but that we understand this phenomenon itself in a fundamentally different way?

Tohei's ki is no different than the Chinese qi - the difference lies in the misunderstanding of some of those that practice each.

My initial Aikido background is KI- Society and I see them as the same - however, not all applications of the use of ki are the same - there are medical applications and martial applications - and even in those subsets, there are variances; as in Ueshiba and Tohei, both used ki in their IS/IP development, but not in the same way.

Greg

phitruong
06-22-2012, 07:58 AM
Tohei's ki is no different than the Chinese qi - the difference lies in the misunderstanding of some of those that practice each.

My initial Aikido background is KI- Society and I see them as the same - however, not all applications of the use of ki are the same - there are medical applications and martial applications - and even in those subsets, there are variances; as in Ueshiba and Tohei, both used ki in their IS/IP development, but not in the same way.

Greg

sheesh Greg! is that the initial salvo of the next KI war? :)

as for IS training, after my encountered with some of the aforementioned IS deviants, i have been working on how their approaches are different, alike, complement, and/or oppose. some i figured out, some i have not. it's interesting and curiosity is my middle name (actually it's donuts and coffee). whenever i get opportunity i jump at the chance to learn new and unusual stuffs, IS/IP that is. oh yeah! and my goal is to acquire great power to satisfy the khan in me that wants to rule the world. :D

gregstec
06-22-2012, 09:15 AM
sheesh Greg! is that the initial salvo of the next KI war? :)



Now that's a thought - things have been pretty dull around here lately - nothing like a good Ki war to stir things up :D

Greg

graham christian
06-22-2012, 02:18 PM
Tohei's ki is no different than the Chinese qi - the difference lies in the misunderstanding of some of those that practice each.

My initial Aikido background is KI- Society and I see them as the same - however, not all applications of the use of ki are the same - there are medical applications and martial applications - and even in those subsets, there are variances; as in Ueshiba and Tohei, both used ki in their IS/IP development, but not in the same way.

Greg

Sorry Greg old mate that's wrong. Blah, blah, blah, blah,...............:)

Just joking.....

Peace.G.

gregstec
06-22-2012, 04:10 PM
Sorry Greg old mate that's wrong. Blah, blah, blah, blah,...............:)

Just joking.....

Peace.G.

Darn, there goes the neighborhood... :D

Greg

Chris Li
06-23-2012, 11:56 AM
So I'm curious:

Who is out there training IS/IP?

Why are you still training IS/IP and what impact has it had on your training?

I'm still working on it even after a frustrating two days with Dan this week. That would be my frustration with myself..

I'm still working it because even at my low level I'm seeing clear benefits in my training including increase stability and more power with much less effort.

If I open my body correctly and express ten chi jin I am already under my opponent. This is true with weapons and with empty hand.

Thanks for your thoughts
Jeremy

Still around ;) it does take awhile...

Of course, there are a number of things that are immediately useful, but I'd say a year to a year and a half for anything to even begin to manifest into conventional Aikido technique. It just takes time to condition the basic body usage.

OTOH, you can't argue with the results :D

Interestingly, we've been finding that new folks with no previous experience actually progress much more quickly - fewer years of bad habits to work through, I guess.

Best,

Chris

Dave de Vos
06-23-2012, 12:48 PM
I started in spring 2011 and I have visited three of Dan's seminars up to now.

I feel the effect of internal training on my body increasing slowly. I think the impact on my aikido training is still minor, though I feel my stability has increased. I started aikido just a little earlier, in summer 2010, so I'm not sure how much of my progress in aikido is due to internal training and not aikido training.

I continue solo training because I'm curious for the effects in the long term. I should train more though, I only train a couple of hours a week.

Shadowfax
06-23-2012, 01:14 PM
Who is out there training IS/IP?

While not as diligently as many here I have been working on incorporating the things I have learned from Mark Murray on the subject on some of his visits to the dojo regarding IS/IP.


Why are you still training IS/IP

Because I don't believe it is possible to have too many tools in one's toolbox. And quite honestly because it is rather fascinating.

and what impact has it had on your training? Nothing huge really as of yet. (I have not been training that long after all) But I have noticed that I more and more often will automatically adjust so that I am stable in some rather odd positions where one would typically be out of balance. I am much more aware of when my body is aligned and integrated and when it is not a make adjustments now without needing to think about it too much.

Nicholas Eschenbruch
06-24-2012, 03:05 AM
Who is out there training IS/IP?

Why are you still training IS/IP and what impact has it had on your training?


For me, everything Jason (who I have never met...) said:

I enjoy it. It's neat to use your body that way and feel what's going on in my body on that level, both on and off the mat. I can't see myself ever going back to using my body the old way again. For one, it's practically fixed back problems that I've had since I was a teenager.

It's increased the depth and understanding of what I'm doing aikido-wise tremendously. I'm definitely more stable, harder to move, more connected and stronger when doing aikido than before, for whatever that's worth. It's made me, at times, desire a greater level of active resistance, just to see how well I can hold it together, but I accept that this level is not what aikido is about. On the other side it's almost completely ruined by view of techniques or at least the endless repetition of techniques and the whole "your hand goes here, your foot goes there" way of doing them, if that makes sense.

Plus I find it sort of meditative: in order even to start doing Dan's stuff in a meaningful way, I need to focus; I need to take responsibility; I need to "believe", in a couple of interesting ways. Shut out the external and internal noise and go deep. It can be a lot more profound than it seems on the web, I find.

chillzATL
06-24-2012, 09:49 AM
Interestingly, we've been finding that new folks with no previous experience actually progress much more quickly - fewer years of bad habits to work through, I guess.

Best,

Chris

I think that when you explain things in terms of feeling rather than strictly doing a movement and then give them separate ways to feel what they should be feeling in the technique, people get it more quickly. I've fixed more problems by stopping someone and pushing/pulling on them to get them to feel they should be feeling than I ever did by saying "put your hand here, move your foot like this, twist your hips here". The less baggage the better!

DH
06-24-2012, 11:16 AM
If you examine Aiki (do) it....is..... Internal skills and spiral movement, and everything else people talk about is just window dressing. I think people are making far, far, too much of the after effects of IP/aki (meaning-waza). The stunning, and powerful aspects of the art are in the changed body and it's use. If you take away the waza, your going to end up internally moving the same way and be powerful and motivating no matter what you do. Aiki(do) simply happens when a person possess aiki. I think the vast majority of those in the art have no aiki and therefore use technique as a substitute for their lack of understanding.

Weirdly...once you understand what Ueshiba was doing and you train your body that way...every, single external waza in Aikido is built on it. Yet take away the IP/aiki and you get a not too impressive jujutsu art. This explains the profound inability of Aikido Shihan to be able to do anything to someone who actually has IP/Aiki. Ueshiba's Aikido was simply internal skills, and there is simply nothing else in Budo that compares with good IP/aiki.
Dan

James Sawers
06-24-2012, 03:00 PM
Facinating, Dan, thanks.....I started Aikido looking for all the stuff you are talking about, but I think I got lost along the way (so-to-speak). Thanks again for reminding me.

DH
06-24-2012, 07:35 PM
Facinating, Dan, thanks.....I started Aikido looking for all the stuff you are talking about, but I think I got lost along the way (so-to-speak). Thanks again for reminding me.


In Aikido
Enter the place where
Nothing Works


Hello Mr Sawers while I appreciate the sarcasm- at the end of the day...things are as they are and they continue. I don't suspect to see any suprises among the status quo any day soon.
My bets are on the ones doing the heavy lifting to change and improve things.
Dan

James Sawers
06-24-2012, 08:06 PM
Sorry, no sarcasm intended. Meant what I said, but sorry if it came across that way.

Mark Raugas
06-25-2012, 07:51 AM
Who is out there training IS/IP? Why are you still training IS/IP and what impact has it had on your training?I took a long break from doing aikido-derived modern jujutsu in order to learn CIMA. Initially, that was for tactics and movement, but the longer I practice bagua, taiji, and xingyi the more I find it changing my approach to budo at a foundational level. I am so far off the reservation when it comes to how I approach locking/throwing at this point I am not sure someone watching me do applications would really say it is aikido or jujutsu. This has made it hard for me to go to a dojo and join in on aikido practice, but I have had lots of good discussions and individual training experiences with people who continue to practice aikido and are working on making internal ideas work in the context of aikido. Because starting CIMA involved me leaving my previous budo group, instead of it being an adjunct to my ongoing practice, I think my experience will be different from some others. I think the task of taking internal ideas and practicing them within the context of an existing practice, versus on their own, is very ambitious and challenging, and I am not sure I would be able to do well at both at the same time. It is hard enough to go from dojo to dojo within a single art, let alone incorporate a sophisticated practice of certain skills into an existing curriculum, especially if you are not the person defining it (e.g., average student at a school who is interested in the internal).

As to why -- the practice has fundamentally changed how I viewed martial arts and given me something that I feel has more depth and potential for exploration than the self-defence oriented judo/aikido/karate mix I had been practicing. I feel that committing to bagua, taiji, and xingyi has improved my practice considerably, and I was happy to put my jujutsu practice on pause and focus on learning instead of continuing to teach or trying to integrate basics from neijia into my jujutsu practice. Taking the time to learn some arts in a more focused manner was the right thing for me to do, but everyone will be different.

Mark Raugas
www.innerdharma.org (http://www.innerdharma.org)

John Connolly
06-25-2012, 02:31 PM
3 reasons I train IS:

First and foremost: I'm training IS because I want to have the kind of real power that allows me to be merciful.

I started training in pugilistic disciplines as a lad and into my 20s, just to defend myself, but as my wisdom and compassion matured, I gravitated to more grappling style arts, as I'd rather have the capability to subdue or incapacitate (yes, even if it means breaking parts of them) an attacker, rather than potentially kill someone with blows to the head.

But still I'm searching for that leg-up that gives me the edge. I want to be able to dominate so completely in a confrontation as to have the REAL option to be merciful. I used to think it was about perfecting technique, but it's so much simpler (and more difficult at the same time) than that. I'm grateful to have met and learned from some extremely talented people on the path to IS skill training.

Secondly, I'm a huge nerd for martial arts-- not in the Tap Out shirt armchair warrior way or the obsessed Bruce Lee fan with "katanas" from chinatown on my walls way, but rather in the geeked out, I need to figure this out way.

My own teacher, Neil Yamamoto got me started thinking about this on another level 10 years ago, and when I've had the lucky occasion to learn from folks with genuine IS skills (and the ability to teach)-- I geek out completely.

Ark's stuff has been a wonderful puzzle for the last several years and has greatly improved my structure and ability to access ground-path, and now that I've had a chance to meet and learn from Dan and his students, I'm spinning trying to catch up and train my mind to teach my body this (new to me) stuff. Nerding out hard.

Third, I love IS work as it is testable, and requires self-examination. It is a process which does not lie. There is constant failure as well as the potential for growth and success thru hard work. This is the hallmark of any viable real skill.

Thomas Campbell
06-27-2012, 01:58 PM
I work on this stuff every day

This is certainly essential to making any real progress. It's easy to fall off the path if training gets interrupted by injuries.

Stability of spine and balance in movement is what I'm seeking and what I am finding, incrementally, with daily practice.

gregstec
06-27-2012, 02:05 PM
This is certainly essential to making any real progress. It's easy to fall off the path if training gets interrupted by injuries.

Stability of spine and balance in movement is what I'm seeking and what I am finding, incrementally, with daily practice.

As you are probably aware, a large portion of this training is mental, and even with injuries, the mental parts can be worked on daily, and really should be even if you don't have any injuries.

Greg

Thomas Campbell
06-27-2012, 02:07 PM
I love IS work as it is testable, and requires self-examination. It is a process which does not lie. There is constant failure as well as the potential for growth and success thru hard work. This is the hallmark of any viable real skill.

Amen, and well-stated.

Thomas Campbell
06-27-2012, 02:08 PM
As you are probably aware, a large portion of this training is mental, and even with injuries, the mental parts can be worked on daily, and really should be even if you don't have any injuries.

Greg

Absolutely. Some guy I think you know said that with this training, the mind gives out before the body.

DH
06-27-2012, 03:43 PM
;) :D

morph4me
06-27-2012, 03:56 PM
Absolutely. Some guy I think you know said that with this training, the mind gives out before the body.

That explains alot:p

Budd
06-27-2012, 04:23 PM
I train IS from the perspective of understanding the whole "cultivate yourself" perspective that martial arts were eventually purported to enable beyond the immediately practical battlefield/dueling/fighting aspects (spent my time in combat sports/arts so already been there, kinda over proving whether I'm tough or not). What's fun is that over time I continue to practice these things as my balance, sensitivity to the connection between myself and another person, and ability to receive/issue power all increase - they translates nicely into practicing aikido waza, putting the gloves on and sparring, or body/body grappling.

I think of timing differently than I used to - I can join better with another person before touching them in a way that I would have considered more "woowoo" stuffs pre-IS training. Then when we do make contact I can be "already arrived" in an initial superior position with regard to their balance (presuming their skills aren't better than mine, or their size/surprise/strength/speed/skills combo doesn't otherwise offset the advantage IS can confer). Same thing at striking range as I can "line up" on someone with minimal movement that can make it harder for them to throw a clean strike with power (again, superior skill/things can overcome this advantage). It's been a while since I've played with weapons, but I see definite overlaps there, too.

As far as raw power, I can hit considerably harder than I could pre-IS, with much smaller movement. I can also hit with more power from weirder angles and with different parts of the body - which has more to do with growing the ability to hit with "all of or as much of your body moving together as one unit as possible" out of any one part of your body (hand, elbow, shoulder, head, etc.) rather than a new hitting "technique" (elbow strike, headbutt, etc.). To me this is much closer to the aikido intent of "atemi" than a strike that intentionally doesn't connect, or presumes uke will move - or conversely adding on pugilism from another system (karate, muay thai) to aikido (not arguing against it, but I'm thinking pure "body strikes" rather than pugilistic technique in this definition).

Grappling gets interesting as well (and I consider many waza of aikido to be a standing jujutsu form of grappling) as your balance and connection with another can give an advantage that makes it feel like you're ahead of their "balance loop" such that you can be immovable along one line of attack, then if the line changes you're ahead of it to capitalize and deflect it into another direction, or counter - without changing much of your outward configuration (again, this advantage can be offset somewhat by other attributes). This I think (along with hitting) gets into the realm of how it "feels different" and "must be felt" for people to understand if and why they are or are not "already doing that".

But I think the genuine seeker will be looking at these things with healthy skepticism and an open mind, while hopefully being smart enough to clinically assess encounters and things seen/learned so that they can make their own choices and eventually own their own progress.

One of the truths I believe around this type of study is that there's a huge amount of independent work that the individual must be self-accountable for - physically and mentally. On one level, this stuff is basically physical conditioning in a different kind of way with a different purpose and desirable outcome than is common in western sports practices, but still rooted in hard work, hours of practice and an unending drive to self-analyze, self-criticize and self-correct. On another level, the mental work that accompanies the physical exertion is exhausting, prone to misdirection, self-perception issues and generally a pain in the tookus.

And like others have said, it's opened my eyes to the foundational "stuff" that goes into all martial arts at their roots, in varying levels of sophistication and purpose, which leads back to self-cultivation, personal ownership and empowerment - which has been a huge appeal for me in years of martial arts study. The pursuit of these things then has an enabling effect across a multitude of other endeavors.

Plus, it's a lot of fun.

Tim Fong
06-28-2012, 03:49 PM
I am. Still doing it because it gets results, altho, I have been doing more weight lifting lately, and this, combined with relaxing the shoulders and trying to prevent the opponent from feeling my feet, has gotten some good results in freestyle grappling practice.

Why am I doing it? Same reason as when I started. Looking for the best results in the shortest amount of time.

AllanF
07-07-2012, 08:55 PM
I am training it and i love it.

Why still...surely the question should be once you have started to train IS why would you stop?

Does it work? Does it give you power you never thought you had? In my recent experience...the answer is unfortunately a resounding YES! (I helped a woman who was being attacked and it is costing me big!):(

john.burn
07-16-2012, 10:19 AM
I'm training in IS all the time - I've met both Mike & Dan as well as having trained with Ikeda sensei a fair old amount over the past 10 to 15 years.

We have 1 class a week dedicated to IS as well as using it within our aikido (or trying to) during all normal classes (that I happen to be teaching).

I'm still doing it because I now get what Ikeda sensei does and how - not that I can do it all obviously but I 'get' what he's doing. For me, it was Mike Sigman that explained the ABC's exceptionally well and gave me a far greater understanding than anyone else so far and it was Ikeda sensei that pretty much made me look into this stuff, I wanted to be able to do what he does, simple as that :).

Chris Knight
08-15-2012, 10:49 AM
I've been training internal strength since April 2012,

I took the chance to meet one of the aforementioned proponents of Aiki, as soon as money and family commitments would allow, and can honestly say was one of the best investments I could have made.

Having only studied Aikido for 3 years, I had a nagging feeling that people were onto something when posting on Aikiweb out Aiki and internal strength.

Having only been to one "Aiki" seminar, it took me about 2 minutes to see the potential and potency of this training, if done correctly.

Although a newbie to martial arts in general, I've studied hours of dvd and youtube footage and get out when I can to meet teachers. All I can say is when I saw the Aiki teacher perform an aikido technique, his whole body spiralled from his feet to his hands, I've never quite seen movement like it, and from that moment on, I wanted to get his body skill.

The other noticeable benefit was that this teacher could move like Ueshiba, remaining stable and pivoting around a central point - continuously, sounds simple, but observed very rarely.

I want to be able to store the power generated, so when people grab you in a dojo, they're already connected, via your body/mental conditioning. I want power on demand, being able to make atemi's from any position with a fully connected body. Easier said than done.

I have had a bad back for 10 years, of which after 4 months of training on average 4-5 hours a week, it has gone. No chiropracter, physio or doctor could diagnose an accurate problem, never mind provide a pain relief or cure.

I just wish I had the time to commit to this training even more, as the more this is practised the better the results, like most things IMO.