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Chris Li
02-22-2012, 12:24 AM
One more post, probably the last one for a little bit...

http://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/archive/2012-02-22/kiichi-hogen-and-the-secret-of-aikido

Best,

Chris

Carsten Möllering
02-22-2012, 03:01 AM
I am sorry, maybe I'm just stupid, but I don' t see what the quote is, you arer writing about?
What did Kiichi actually say?

Even without getting this, I am deeply convinced that "the things that Ueshiba did, ... were very very old"!

David Orange
02-22-2012, 08:30 AM
I am sorry, maybe I'm just stupid, but I don' t see what the quote is, you arer writing about?
What did Kiichi actually say?

Even without getting this, I am deeply convinced that "the things that Ueshiba did, ... were very very old"!

I had the same problem. The only quote I could find was when Ueshiba told Henry Kono he couldn't do what Uesiba did because Kono didn't understand yin and yang.

Interesting stuff about Kiichi, but I didn't find what he said. I got the idea, though, that Kiichi's statement inspired Morihei's statement. Maybe it wasn't what he "said" so much as what he taught, which was here: "Kiichi Hogen also had a reputation as an expert in Onmyodo, also called Inyodo (陰陽道), which is literally "The Way of In and Yo" ("In and Yo" = "Yin and Yang", for the Chinese speakers)."

This does seem to be exactly the same line that Donn Draegger described in his budo series.

Cheers.

David

Chris Li
02-22-2012, 09:11 AM
Ha! Seems that the actual quote that I was talking about didn't make it into the actual blog post (it was in the draft copy, I swear!). Anyway, I added the text of the original quotation. Sorry for any confusion!

Best,

Chris

Chris Li
02-22-2012, 09:20 AM
I am sorry, maybe I'm just stupid, but I don' t see what the quote is, you arer writing about?
What did Kiichi actually say?

Even without getting this, I am deeply convinced that "the things that Ueshiba did, ... were very very old"!

I must be getting very very old - or I shouldn't be posting late at night. Anyway, I added the text of the actual quotation.

What I was hinting at there was that Aikido has traditionally been presented as Something New, a kind of phase change from the past martial arts.

It has also been presented as Something Unique, a different kind of training from all other martial arts.

Morihei Ueshiba encouraged these ideas, I think, as did the people after him.

This post starts to look at some of the things (and there is a lot more) that makes me examine the above ideas more closely.

Best,

Chris

woudew
02-22-2012, 10:01 AM
Thanks Chris,

Another thought provoking blog.

Ernesto Lemke
02-22-2012, 11:24 AM
Hi Chris, I really think your blogs are setting the stage for some long needed re-examination of established viewpoints. I'd like to go over a couple of points.

In your last paragraph you state:

What if Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba was an internal martial artist

I'm not sure whether people unfamiliar with "In Yo" get from reading the blog that this is an established aspect of Internal (Martial Arts) Training. Even in case some do, that is not to say all folks view In Yo the same, even within an Internal Martial Arts paradigm. Also since the quotation itself does little to explain how this 2+8/3+7 etc. model actually transfers on the physical (Internal Paradigm) plane.
So, the conclusion that Morihei Ueshiba was an internal martial artist based on his reference to this quotation, I fear, will for the uninitiated remain a gigantic puzzle. Or at least a big leap of faith.

I suspect the same goes for the next part of your concluding question.

in a community filled with students researching and developing the same principles

Since your blog is addressed also/mostly(?) to those outside the Aiki/IP/IT/IS etc. paradigm, I'm not sure whether your first three excellent questions....

How will that change how we evaluate his writings and training?
How will the established history and methodology of Aikido change when considered through the lens of greater knowledge?
What if the things that Ueshiba did, instead of being very very new, were very very old?

....automatically lead to the suggestion Ueshiba was an Internal Martial Artist. Even though you know I believe he was :D

fwiw

Chris Li
02-22-2012, 12:18 PM
Hi Chris, I really think your blogs are setting the stage for some long needed re-examination of established viewpoints. I'd like to go over a couple of points.

In your last paragraph you state:

I'm not sure whether people unfamiliar with "In Yo" get from reading the blog that this is an established aspect of Internal (Martial Arts) Training. Even in case some do, that is not to say all folks view In Yo the same, even within an Internal Martial Arts paradigm. Also since the quotation itself does little to explain how this 2+8/3+7 etc. model actually transfers on the physical (Internal Paradigm) plane.
So, the conclusion that Morihei Ueshiba was an internal martial artist based on his reference to this quotation, I fear, will for the uninitiated remain a gigantic puzzle. Or at least a big leap of faith.

I suspect the same goes for the next part of your concluding question.

Since your blog is addressed also/mostly(?) to those outside the Aiki/IP/IT/IS etc. paradigm, I'm not sure whether your first three excellent questions....

....automatically lead to the suggestion Ueshiba was an Internal Martial Artist. Even though you know I believe he was :D

fwiw

Sure - that's mostly foreshadowing for things to come. Or I hope so...

I didn't want to get too deep into anything technical here, I'm not sure that I'll get too far into technical matters at all. I wanted to set the stage a little bit and point out the Chinese connection in a simple manner, I don't know if that came through or not.

It's been a while since I've really written anything of that length, so a lot of things are a little rusty.

Best,

Chris

DH
02-22-2012, 12:51 PM
Hi Guys
I don't think Chris's blogs -like Ellis's book- was ever meant to conclusively prove anything, but rather to highlight facts and spur research.
There is a way to take it a step further:

Detail the writings and sayings of Morihei Ueshiba for what they were; direct quotes of Chinese internal principles.
Then directly correlate or establish those same saying to the internal work in the Chinese arts.
Then demonstrate their use and what they actually mean in aikido.


This has never been done before by anyone capable of the work. I have not read of, met or seen any Japanese Shihan capable of the fullness of this endeavor. In fact due to the requirements inherent in the work, I think it is best left to westerners and it is heavily in process.

Dan

Ernesto Lemke
02-22-2012, 01:10 PM
Hi Chris, sure, no problem. I more then appreciate the effort, plus, you can see how my writing skills hold up :eek:

I think Dan is spot on but then, just because it is HE who is saying this, some people will tend to be prejudiced/biassed in the first place. There is no escaping the facts, but as you say, it's setting the stage first. It would make a rather compelling case to investigate and present this terrain under these conditions. IOW when is the next Blog due? :D

DH
02-22-2012, 01:38 PM
Hi Chris, sure, no problem. I more then appreciate the effort, plus, you can see how my writing skills hold up :eek:

I think Dan is spot on but then, just because it is HE who is saying this, some people will tend to be prejudiced/biassed in the first place. There is no escaping the facts, but as you say, it's setting the stage first. It would make a rather compelling case to investigate and present this terrain under these conditions. IOW when is the next Blog due? :D
Well I accept the bias for what it is and it only exists from a distance; in person everything is made clear and that...right quick. For whatever reasons face to face on a mat spurs communication and friendships.

Setting that aside, most reasonable and intelligent people are going to see the facts and Ueshiba's standing in the world of Martial arts; both historically and contextually in a way never seen before.
Dan

Matt Fisher
02-22-2012, 01:54 PM
Ha! Seems that the actual quote that I was talking about didn't make it into the actual blog post (it was in the draft copy, I swear!). Anyway, I added the text of the original quotation. Sorry for any confusion!

Best,

Chris

Thanks to Chris for a VERY thought provoking blog entry...

I just wanted to point out that John Stevens's book Budo Secrets contains text from Ki-ichi Hogen. The selection in Stevens's book is longer (in English) than what Chris included in his blog, but I don't know how different the two texts are in Japanese. In his very short intro to this section, Stevens writes that "These teachings have been widely employed by martial arts instructors over the centuries and are still in use. Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, often quoted from this list when teaching and demonstrating Aikido techniques, and so did my Aikido teacher Rinjiro Shirata."

Matt Fisher
Allegheny Aikido
Pittsburgh, PA

DH
02-22-2012, 04:53 PM
Thanks to Chris for a VERY thought provoking blog entry...

I just wanted to point out that John Stevens's book Budo Secrets contains text from Ki-ichi Hogen. The selection in Stevens's book is longer (in English) than what Chris included in his blog, but I don't know how different the two texts are in Japanese. In his very short intro to this section, Stevens writes that "These teachings have been widely employed by martial arts instructors over the centuries and are still in use. Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, often quoted from this list when teaching and demonstrating Aikido techniques, and so did my Aikido teacher Rinjiro Shirata."

Matt Fisher
Allegheny Aikido
Pittsburgh, PA
I know what it means, why it is practical and how to do it...as well as how to fail in just trying to mimic it.
I have seen a few Japanese Aikido Shihan display it and never tell anyone what they were doing or how they could do it too. I both explain and teach it at every seminar.

It is yet again another example of what the vast majority in Aikido do not know about the teachings of their founder and what they thought was spiritual, turns out to be foundational and incredibly practical-with weapons and without.
Dan

Chris Li
02-22-2012, 05:41 PM
Thanks to Chris for a VERY thought provoking blog entry...

I just wanted to point out that John Stevens's book Budo Secrets contains text from Ki-ichi Hogen. The selection in Stevens's book is longer (in English) than what Chris included in his blog, but I don't know how different the two texts are in Japanese. In his very short intro to this section, Stevens writes that "These teachings have been widely employed by martial arts instructors over the centuries and are still in use. Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, often quoted from this list when teaching and demonstrating Aikido techniques, and so did my Aikido teacher Rinjiro Shirata."

Matt Fisher
Allegheny Aikido
Pittsburgh, PA

That's from the text that Endo uses:

来たれば即ち迎え、去れば即ち送り、
対すれば即ち和す。
五五の十
二八の十
一九の十
是を以て和すべし。
虚実を察し、陰伏を知り、
大は方処を絶ち、細は微塵に入る。
殺活機にあり、変化時に応ず。
事に臨んで心を動ずること莫(なかれ)や。

And here's my translation. I've posted this before somewhere on these forums (with some small alterations):

If it comes, then meet it, if it leaves, then send it away.
If it resists, than harmonize it.
5 and 5 are 10.
2 and 8 are 10.
1 and 9 are 10.
You should harmonize like this.
Intuit true and false, know what is hidden,
The large suppresses all, the small enters the microscopic.
There are chances for life and death, without reacting to changes.
Approach things without moving your heart (without being disturbed).

I used the other text because that was the one in the Suganuma interview, and therefore easier to follow for the point that I was making - but this one is a little more extensive.

Best,

Chris

Chris Li
02-22-2012, 05:43 PM
I know what it means, why it is practical and how to do it...as well as how to fail in just trying to mimic it.
I have seen a few Japanese Aikido Shihan display it and never tell anyone what they were doing or how they could do it too. I both explain and teach it at every seminar.

It is yet again another example of what the vast majority in Aikido do not know about the teachings of their founder and what they thought was spiritual, turns out to be foundational and incredibly practical-with weapons and without.
Dan

I didn't want to get into any "how to do" stuff - that's a whole other can of worms!

I'll stick to making my small points for the moment. ;)

Best,

Chris

DH
02-22-2012, 05:54 PM
I didn't want to get into any "how to do" stuff - that's a whole other can of worms!

I'll stick to making my small points for the moment. ;)

Best,

Chris
If it comes, then meet it, if it leaves, then send it away.
If it resists, than harmonize it.
5 and 5 are 10.
2 and 8 are 10.
1 and 9 are 10.
You should harmonize like this.
Intuit true and false, know what is hidden,
The large suppresses all, the small enters the microscopic.
There are chances for life and death, without reacting to changes.
Approach things without moving your heart (without being disturbed).
Just read that!!! In light of what is being revealed in seminars!
I still haven't gotten over how much he laid at their feet and to think they said things like....
"We couldn't wait for him to shut up, so we could go back and train...."
And then decades of mistranslated and untranslated instructions all pointing the way.
Sigh
Dan

gregstec
02-22-2012, 06:51 PM
If it comes, then meet it, if it leaves, then send it away.
If it resists, than harmonize it.
5 and 5 are 10.
2 and 8 are 10.
1 and 9 are 10.
You should harmonize like this.
Intuit true and false, know what is hidden,
The large suppresses all, the small enters the microscopic.
There are chances for life and death, without reacting to changes.
Approach things without moving your heart (without being disturbed).

Just read that!!! In light of what is being revealed in seminars!
I still haven't gotten over how much he laid at their feet and to think they said things like....
"We couldn't wait for him to shut up, so we could go back and train...."
And then decades of mistranslated and untranslated instructions all pointing the way.
Sigh
Dan

Ya know, all that stuff is very revealing, but without an explanation within the proper context, it don't mean a thing and could very easily send people off on tangents that can totally skew what is really being said - IOW, everyone will filter it through their own levels of understand AND expectations as to what they want it to mean - :)

Greg

Chris Li
02-22-2012, 09:06 PM
Thanks to Chris for a VERY thought provoking blog entry...

I just wanted to point out that John Stevens's book Budo Secrets contains text from Ki-ichi Hogen. The selection in Stevens's book is longer (in English) than what Chris included in his blog, but I don't know how different the two texts are in Japanese. In his very short intro to this section, Stevens writes that "These teachings have been widely employed by martial arts instructors over the centuries and are still in use. Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, often quoted from this list when teaching and demonstrating Aikido techniques, and so did my Aikido teacher Rinjiro Shirata."

Matt Fisher
Allegheny Aikido
Pittsburgh, PA

Thanks Matt - people seemed interested, so I added a translation and the source for the passage that John Steven used (along with your note) to http://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/archive/2012-02-22/kiichi-hogen-and-the-secret-of-aikido

Best,

Chris

DH
02-22-2012, 09:16 PM
Ya know, all that stuff is very revealing, but without an explanation within the proper context, it don't mean a thing and could very easily send people off on tangents that can totally skew what is really being said - IOW, everyone will filter it through their own levels of understand AND expectations as to what they want it to mean - :)

Greg
That is the point Greg.
No further information was offered then.
None has been available since.
I do not believe -any- of the post war Japanese know this stuff, nor how to teach it. For the most part Morihei Ueshiba's explanation for power and aiki is dead to them.

I have every intention of helping out...in person. I have no intention what-so-ever of arguing any more over this truly wonderful teaching on the net with people who can't deliver in person-yet are convinced that they already know.
I'm going to wait for the book.
Take the long view. It will come out well in the end. Truth is wonderful and has healing qualities.

Dan

DH
02-23-2012, 10:45 AM
I'm not sure whether people unfamiliar with "In Yo" get from reading the blog that this is an established aspect of Internal (Martial Arts) Training. Even in case some do, that is not to say all folks view In Yo the same, even within an Internal Martial Arts paradigm. Also since the quotation itself does little to explain how this 2+8/3+7 etc. model actually transfers on the physical (Internal Paradigm) plane.
So, the conclusion that Morihei Ueshiba was an internal martial artist based on his reference to this quotation, I fear, will for the uninitiated remain a gigantic puzzle. Or at least a big leap of faith.

I suspect the same goes for the next part of your concluding question.

Since your blog is addressed also/mostly(?) to those outside the Aiki/IP/IT/IS etc. paradigm, I'm not sure whether your first three excellent questions....

....automatically lead to the suggestion Ueshiba was an Internal Martial Artist. Even though you know I believe he was :D

fwiw
Hi Ernesto
To answer the question of connecting the link to internal power -from Ueshiba to China. It's a no brainer and irrefutable. It is in black and white in Ueshiba's correctly translated works with their counterparts being wirtten in translated Chinese works and in the history of budo in Japan.
It hasn't appeared anywhere because the authors did not have the skills necessary to the task. They could point and speculate but lacking the physical skills and not having the translation ability was a significant hurdle.
If you look to the literature we have discussed you will find innumerable references; both in specific reference and in detailed application. I am sure at this point you can see it action in the ICMA and in Aikido as well. An interesting study is to compare the movement of Tohei and Ueshiba it is clear that Tohei -while powerful-didn't get it in its fullness and was not incorporating the same method of movement as Ueshiba whihc more fully incorporated this model.

In and of itself it is interesting to understand how a link between; In/Yo ho, Heaven/earth/man and the above passage from the tora no maki is a requirement, the former empowers the later, otherwise people can only mimic with limited results. It's a pure comedy that a few Japanese shihan have shown it, but crippled as they are by their Japanese teaching model, it is all but useless to train with them and hope to ever get anywhere.
Dan

Ernesto Lemke
02-23-2012, 03:46 PM
Hi Dan,

As I hope was evident in my post, I was raising questions thinking mostly of those people who remain unconvinced there is actually anything to "Internal Training."
Fact is, a lot of aikido practitioners are....unconvinced that is. For those who are not, Chris' points are all but affirming established viewpoints. However, what I think Chris is attempting to show/do, is make a case in favour of IT being a well established aspect to Ueshiba finding it's origin way back to China (among other things - sorry if I'm misrepresenting your aims here Chris).

For the "non-believers", it would do good, I think, to carefully outline where and how IT has it's place in Ueshiba's training regime. I think Chris did an excellent job raising those questions. I don't care much whether these are uncomfortable or not. They need to be addressed.

However, the link from references to In Yo, ten/chi/jin, etc. in Ueshiba's writing and making the case that he therefore was an Internal Martial Artist for people with no experience with IT - who therefore miss an IMO essential frame of reference for a proper context - is not a "leap" that will follow automatically. I can see people reading the references but reading the claims that those references are part of a tangible training approach from the IP/Aiki partisans still sounds like a case of trying to convince people.
The arguments in favour of this viewpoint - if the desire is to get the point across that that was what he was - IMO doesn't need a repeat of the same things: pointing to all of his references to IT. I think the point first needs to be made that these references ARE aspects of IT. And then we are right back to where Aikiweb was some 5 years ago.....but...

How come all those firy debates concerning IT have all but gone? Some people may have become tired. Some are happy to dwell in their own beliefs and don't want things to change.
I've been reading, ocassionaly posting, on the various forums for 10+ years now and it seems like almost all has been said. The exciting times are now less shared online but more in person. Still, we, I, have the internet to thank for that.

Well, a little too much red wine, too late a time, and some lamenting on times when Aikiweb was a little more exciting. I do think these are exciting times though! But then I have my viewpoints firmly rooted within the IT paradigm. C'mon people! It's a fun place to be! Come share the fun!
:)

Chris Li
02-23-2012, 03:57 PM
Hi Dan,

As I hope was evident in my post, I was raising questions thinking mostly of those people who remain unconvinced there is actually anything to "Internal Training."
Fact is, a lot of aikido practitioners are....unconvinced that is. For those who are not, Chris' points are all but affirming established viewpoints. However, what I think Chris is attempting to show/do, is make a case in favour of IT being a well established aspect to Ueshiba finding it's origin way back to China (among other things - sorry if I'm misrepresenting your aims here Chris).
:)

Pretty close, I'm not (quite) saying what it is (although I threw in some hints for fun), and in a way what it is is irrelevant to the main point.

Aikido has traditionally been presented as something New and Unique, an original creation of Morihei Ueshiba.

Stan Pranin, of course, did a lot to debunk that and show the linkages back to Daito-ryu.

What I was trying to show was that there is a core linkage - admitted and cited by Ueshiba himself, to a long tradition reaching back to China.

I hope that the blog was a clear way to show that linkage in a way that's difficult to dispute and simple to understand. Of course, there is also a lot of other evidence for these kinds of links - but that will come up later.

Whether the composition of that linkage is some form of internal training, or not, I didn't want to address in that one post in any depth, it just gets too complex, I think.

Of course, there's a pretty good chance that will come up in some future discussion... ;)

Best,

Chris

Ernesto Lemke
02-23-2012, 04:17 PM
See? "Things to come..."
;)

Sure thing. I can only applaud the way you are able to "shape" getting a very complex and "controversial" point across in quite simple to understand writing. Hey, if a non native speaker like myself is able to read it (more or less :D ) then I don't see how native speakers can't. Unless they ain't willing to listen....
:confused:

Ellis Amdur
02-23-2012, 08:04 PM
I - can't - help - it.

One other whole area of questioning and research that people brush off. Shamanism. Paranormal powers. I can hear the scoffing - but is it any different from scoffing about IT?

There are a number of descriptions of Ueshiba calling down the gods (Re Mariye Takahashi's account on Aikido Journal, for one). I've read others, including by Shioda. Now Takeda Sokaku is sometimes described as showing a level of intuition (also a manifestation of aiki in the literature in question) that is nearly paranormal. But Ueshiba is described as doing things that no one - I repeat no one - in Daito-ryu is described - or claims. This is easy to brush off. Are the people who expeirenced paranormal experiences in connection with Osensei the most susceptible, the most credulous, the most bliss-ninnied as all? Like Shioda Gozo, for example?

Abe Seiseki asserted that Ueshiba was doing something different - definitively different from Daito-ryu. Now - don't get your knickers in a twist - aikiboyz - I'm not talking about technique, and I'm not talking about the IS/aiki paradigm. I think he was talking about these other powers that Ueshiba seemed to have access to.

See, if you all intend to do justice to Ueshiba, it's not enough to bring him back to aiki, so to speak, to reserrect the internal strength paradigm. You all (and me too) have been the brunt of heated denial - that this IS has anything to do with Ueshiba, that it's a fantasy, whatever.

Well, given that there are all these accounts of ueshiba doing things beyond that - accounts by Shioda, among others, then perhaps a whole other area of research would be to compile all those accounts in one place, and see if there are any operating principles.

Deal with it, kids. Ueshiba's aikido was not only DAito-ryu with a religious trippy overlay, just as it was not merely watered down DR. Maybe it's all fantasy. BUT -
1. When terry Dobson describes ueshiba as grabbing his wrist and feeling like a red hot wire ran through his flesh, when Shirata describes the agony of his yonkyo, when an old guy from Tomiki cricles states that everytime he laid hands on me, it hurt, and Mochizuki stated that the reason they took jumping ukemi was to get away from being grabbed by him - all of this is a combination of raw power and Daito-ryu, together. That's the way some people describe the yonkyo in Daito-ryu - recently had that on another discussion thread. Fair enough.
2. BUT - when Dobson describes deciding that he's going to kill the old man, to attack him with full force and hold nothing back and suddenly find himself looking down at the earth, the emerald/blue globe of the earth, falling back through the earth's atmosphere, it taking all the time a free-fall from the upper atmosphere would take, and then BOOM, impact on the mat, to find Osensei looking down on him with a knowing look in his eyes. - - well, that's not Daito-ryu. It may be too many drugs -except Terry wasn't high. It may be fantasy. Or - maybe all those austerities enabled Ueshiba to tap into a different realm of power as well - that legendarily held by shaman (Kiichi Hogen was believed to be a tengu, as I recall - and was legendarily believed to have all sorts of superhuman powers.).

Anyway, it would be kind of funny if those who are outraged or dismayed or disappointed that most of aikido is not interested in the IS/aiki that if Ueshiba presented, would, on the other hand, dismiss the various accounts of other powers.

Just sayin' :p

thisisnotreal
02-23-2012, 08:51 PM
what's the big secret?
there is an infinity after this life.
that there are angels and demons and a God and a Devil.
you can choose and alloy yourself
alchemical magick

so what? you can make a connection with the powers beyond.
this is the oldest knowledge of all.
and the most dangerous.

Joshua 24:15

With deep respect to you,
Josh

Allen Beebe
02-23-2012, 09:56 PM
A thought (Ellis' thought) certainly deserving of consideration for anyone seriously considering! (I know I did!)

From Aiki News #85 (Summer 1990) (Subscribe!)

Andre' Nocquet:

"O-Sensei On Religion

[One day] I said to Ueshiba Sensei, "You are always praying, Ueshiba Sensei. Then aikido is a religion." "No, that's not true. Aikido is never a religion, but if you are a Christian, you will be a better Christian because of aikido. If you are a Buddhist, you will be a better Buddhist." I thought it was an amazing response. I really liked his answer. Since he was a Japanese I was afraid he would say that Christianity was nothing. Ueshiba Sensei had a great deal of respect for Christ. I was living in a four-mat room in the dojo and he would knock on the door and enter. He would sit down beside me and there was a portrait of Jesus Christ. He would place his hands together in a gesture of respect. I asked him one day if there wasn't a similarity between his prophecies and those of Christ. He answered, "Yes, because Jesus said his technique was love and I, Morihei, also say that my technique is love. Jesus created a religion, but I didn't. Aikido is an art rather than a religion. But if you practice my aikido a great deal you will be a better Christian." Then I asked, "Sensei should I remain a Christian?" He replied, "Yes, absolutely. You were raised as a Christian in France. Remain a Christian." If he had told me to stop being a Christian and become a Buddhist, I would have been lost. My heart was full of Ueshiba Sensei because he had a vision of the entire world and that we were all his children. He called me his son."

and from Kisshomaru Ueshiba's "Aikido" 1974.

"When anybody asks if my Aiki budo principles are taken from religion, I say, "No." My true budo principles enlighten religions and lead them to completion."

So perhaps a big "No!" to religion per-say, but then
of course he goes on to say,

"I do not make a companion of men. Whom, then , do I make a companion of? God."

and

"You should first make God's heart yours."

"I leave everything as it is to God."

"Its only purpose is to perform the work of God."

"The "Way" means to be one with the Will of God and practice it."

Or conversely . . .

"That is to say, to turn the devil-minded world into the World of Spirit. This is the mission of Aikido.
The devil-mind will go down in defeat and the Spirit rise up in victory. Then Aikido will bear fruit in this world."

So while we do not hear a lot of O-sensei prompting us to develop his seriously cool and impressive shamanic powers (not to detract from Takeda Sokau who too disappeared and re-appeared in front of witnesses, and is said to have "read" people and "dressed them down" based on his readings and also studied Mikkyo with Mountain Ascetics), we do seem to hear him differentiate religion (seemingly in his mind a relative thing) and God (seemingly in his mind an absolute thing) AND promote a communion with God (or Gods - he's got that whole whole Mono Theistic (Omoto) with a Pan Theistic (Multi-ryu) remix thing going on)

But perhaps he, himself, offers a clarification and/or reconciliation . . .

"Those who seek to study Aikido should open their minds, listen to the sincerity of God through Aiki, and practice it"

What was that? Is that properly translated???? Was Ueshiba Morihei, O-sensei, Ame no Murakumo Kuki Samu Hara Ryu O O Kami suggesting that individuals of open mind should, THROUGH AIKI, "listen to the sincerity of God," "and practice it?"

Maybe that is why he wrote so much about Aiki!

Maybe, he saw himself pointing to the Aiki of the ancients and saying, "Look guys, this is cool AND it is more than just useful for fighting, and/or impressing friends . . . I think it is a key to union with God! AND, I think union with God is the solution to a lot of our problems . . . like fighting, and the need to impress each other."

So now I just have to figure out how getting off of the line of attack and twisting my partners wrist brings me closer to god . . . hmmm, so much to do, so much to think about! :p

Akeman1963
02-23-2012, 11:09 PM
Possibly, O'Sensei did not speak of the internal because of the inherent attitude of Japanese.

A perspective from writings on Buhda, given to the assembly of monks at Kannondōri in Kōshōhōrin-ji Temple on the fifth day of the summer training period in the second year of the En’o era (May 12, 1240).

http://www.shastaabbey.org/pdf/shobo/008keise.pdf

page 72 or page 8 in pdf

'Further, this land of Japan is a distant place separated from others by vast seas. The hearts of its people are befuddled in the extreme. From the distant past, it has not been common for saintly persons or those naturally gifted with good sense to be born here, to say nothing of the scarcity of true students of the Way. When the fellow who knows nothing of the heart that seeks the Way is told of this Way-seeking heart, he turns a deaf ear to this good instruction. As a result, he does not reflect upon himself and harbors resentment towards others.

In short, when you put into practice your intention to seek enlightenment, you should not concern yourself with letting worldly people know that you have given rise to the enlightenment-seeking mind and are practicing the Way. Rather, you should conduct yourself so that they may not know it; even more, you should not speak of it openly. People today who seek Truth are rare; as a result, the majority do not engage themselves in spiritual practice and have not awakened in their hearts. Desirous of praise from others, they seek for someone who will tell them how integrated their practice and understanding are. This is just what ‘being deluded within delusion’ means. You should immediately toss out such ridiculous notions'

gregstec
02-24-2012, 09:20 AM
I - can't - help - it.

One other whole area of questioning and research that people brush off. Shamanism. Paranormal powers. I can hear the scoffing - but is it any different from scoffing about IT?............

Just sayin' :p

Well, here we all are finally having a nice logically exchange in this thread, and then SHAZAM!, the master pot stirrer himself jumps down from the clouds and throws in a bit of his own magic :)

IMO, I think the stories of supernatural and/or paranormal powers are just a result of ego fueled self delusion - when accomplished martial artists were confronted with power they could not understand or duplicated, it just had to be from a supernatural source; after all, if it was not, they should be able to duplicate it. Also, there probably was a certain amount of deliberate exaggeration to build up and foster along the reputation of O Sensei from his dedicated disciples. I believe Tohei talk about those exaggerations in one of his interviews in Aikido Journal; I think it was the same interview where he said O Sensei only taught him how to truly relax.

Now I am not discounting the possibility of Shamanism. The truth is, if you can not say "been there done that" with O Sensei, you will never know for sure the source of his power - and even if you can say that, you probably still won't know; that is somewhat evident from his deshi since no one has duplicated his skill level.

So, the two choices for the source of his power appear to be shamanism or IP/AIKI - personally, I think too much has been attributed to shamanism in the past, and I do not know of anyone actively teaching a particularly successful shamanistic approach nowadays, so I think I will continue the pursuit of IP/AIKI - at least in that, there now appears to be a path to follow that is producing results :D

Greg

Chris Li
02-24-2012, 09:30 AM
Well, here we all are finally having a nice logically exchange in this thread, and then SHAZAM!, the master pot stirrer himself jumps down from the clouds and throws in a bit of his own magic :)

IMO, I think the stories of supernatural and/or paranormal powers are just a result of ego fueled self delusion - when accomplished martial artists were confronted with power they could not understand or duplicated, it just had to be from a supernatural source; after all, if it was not, they should be able to duplicate it. Also, there probably was a certain amount of deliberate exaggeration to build up and foster along the reputation of O Sensei from his dedicated disciples. I believe Tohei talk about those exaggerations in one of his interviews in Aikido Journal; I think it was the same interview where he said O Sensei only taught him how to truly relax.


I seem to recall Tohei making comments about exaggerations - but about things that happened years before he appeared on the scene, so I didn't give it that much weight (I don't know if that's the interview that you're talking about).

I have an open mind about the powers - but I haven't seen any demonstrations of them yet myself.

I will say that, regardless of any manifestation or non-manifestation of paranormal effects, there are definitely (IMO) important linkages between the traditional internal training paradigm used by Ueshiba and his spiritual/religious training.

The nature of those, and the implications for understanding the structure of Ueshiba's training, may come up somewhere some day - you never know... :D

Best,

Chris

gregstec
02-24-2012, 09:50 AM
I seem to recall Tohei making comments about exaggerations - but about things that happened years before he appeared on the scene, so I didn't give it that much weight (I don't know if that's the interview that you're talking about).

Yes, I believe that is the one - he may have been talking after the fact, but the impression I got was that even those present during the time of the events, viewed the stories as exaggeration as well - the point is that I think Tohei also said he has never seen any of those feats repeated.:)


I have an open mind about the powers - but I haven't seen any demonstrations of them yet myself.

I will say that, regardless of any manifestation or non-manifestation of paranormal effects, there are definitely (IMO) important linkages between the traditional internal training paradigm used by Ueshiba and his spiritual/religious training.

The nature of those, and the implications for understanding the structure of Ueshiba's training, may come up somewhere some day - you never know... :D

Best,

Chris

I had a conversation one day about aiki and aptitude where I stated I thought a lot of the success someone could have with learning aiki depended upon their natural aptitude to understand and learn the particulars required. The person I was talking to thought that it was more a matter of attitude or perseverance and work that made a major difference. IMO, all are important, but if you have two people putting in the same level of effort in training, it will be the one with the better aptitude that will excel over the other. Now if you take someone with great aptitude AND extreme attitude coupled with extreme perseverance, you just might end up with an O Sensei or a Sagawa :)

Greg

Marc Abrams
02-24-2012, 09:59 AM
Ellis Amdur raised a very interesting point that deserves a degree of both notice and caution.

When people began talking about IP/Aiki as the almost lost component in Aikido, it created a big stir. This is an example of a common dilemma when exploring paradigms of understanding/knowledge. Accepting that information required the person to make a paradigm shift in order to begin appreciate and then begin to understand what people were talking about. The previous paradigm had to do with the purely physical, technical movements that were considered the essence of waza. Now, you have people who come along and say "NO" there are things going on inside the body, and a different operating system for controlling the body that need to be recognized and utilized in order to really begin to do waza. The easiest thing for people to do, is to ignore this information, because it does not fit into a pre-existing paradigm. The hardest thing for people to do is to accept the limitations of an existing paradigm and open it up to scrutiny and change (shift) to create a new and different paradigm that places the information into a useable form.

People acknowledge that there are extraordinary events that occur in interactions with other people. People can acknowledge that there is a greater frequency of those concurrences amongst a subset of people that typically are very spiritual and unusually sensitive to their environment. The easiest thing to do is to discount those events as spurious, random events that become inappropriately linked to unusual thoughts and alleged experiences. The hardest thing to do, is to accept that there are things that do not neatly fit inside of our current paradigm of experiences and we don't quite know what to do with that.

Stories of O'Sensei's supernatural powers do exist. Some have been disproven and others have not. We have enough information to acknowledge that O'Sensei had IP/Aiki abilities that he had learned and developed within himself. We should also be open to the possibility of an added factor that could explain the "supernatural." I am quite the harsh skeptic. I will also be the first one to acknowledge that I have personally experienced some things with other people (and at least one personal experience) that simply did not fit within my existing paradigms of understanding. Rather than discount those experiences, I recognize that there exists the likelihood of events and things happening that I cannot fully appreciate, let alone, understand due to the limitations of my current paradigms of understanding.

We are asking other people to open themselves up to make the necessary paradigm shift necessary to become aware of the necessity to learn the IP/Aiki in order to come closer to doing O'Sensei's Aikido. That should not come at the expense or exclusion of other potential paradigm shifts that may be necessary to make as we move forward. Show me, is always the best policy. That being said, we might not be open enough to really appreciate the depths of what we are being shown. Keeping an open and a great deal of skepticism is my policy, what is yours..... (and I am not an Allstate agent...).

Marc Abrams

DH
02-24-2012, 10:05 AM
Ellis Amdur wrote:
I - can't - help - it.

One other whole area of questioning and research that people brush off. Shamanism. Paranormal powers. I can hear the scoffing - but is it any different from scoffing about IT?............

Just sayin'
Yes Ellis, it is different.
I am not much concerned with people doubting the very real physical and observable results of Internal strength that have been documented for generations. In my estimation and experience for years now, their opinions continue to change once they meet people who have various degrees of internal strength, and more so with those who can demonstrate some sophistication in actually using it to fight.
The physical manifestations attributed to Ueshiba and also attributable to others in China run the gamut of educated Martial Arts people acknowledging great skills, to lesser lights being overwrought and offering rather ridiculous and conflated reports.
I have seen sooo much horseshit done in the name of ukemi that it makes anything possible. I have also seen otherwise credible people all but mesmerized by certain teachers. I have restrained myself from attending certain seminars if only to halt this nonsense in it's tracks and bring people back to a more reasoned view of expectations and probable outcomes. If I hear one more person talking about this or that teacher "Being on a different level" of no touch throws and mentally controlling people to forestall attacks, I just might start showing up. Hell I could send students to show up.
It is only worth noting that people lose themselves and continue to be mentally "played" by otherwise real and talented people, so they think everyone is suseptable to the same effect. There is collusion going on at a level they simple cannot fathom so it is all so very real to them.
What did the guy who defeated Ueshiba offer by way of some woo woo powers?
Was he a kami also?
And why haven't we read of any Judo people stating Ueshiba was a kami?
There were similar things said of Takeda which he laughed off or scorned.

The idea of Ueshiba displaying otherworldly powers I dismiss out of hand. As talking points and research this notion of his power being singular and supernatural remains a pivotal point in keeping others away from the real work that they can do to attain power themselves
Dan

Demetrio Cereijo
02-24-2012, 10:17 AM
The idea of Ueshiba displaying otherworldly powers I dismiss out of hand. As talking points and research this notion of his power being singular and supernatural remains a pivotal point in keeping others away from the real work that they can do to attain power themselves
Dan

Unless these powers were not so otherwordly but he sold them as if they were.

DH
02-24-2012, 10:29 AM
Unless these powers were not so otherwordly but he sold them as if they were.
No not just him...them. And that's my point. People really buy this stuff.
It is worth noting the prep work and grooming that goes on with these somewhat odd teachers, loooong before they step on a mat. It is easy to take real and actual skills, combine them with an ukemi model and mental manipulation and come out a boy wonder. It's a twice told tale that still sucks in otherwise solid people.
Dan

Demetrio Cereijo
02-24-2012, 10:37 AM
No not just him...them. And that's my point. People really buy this stuff.
It is worth noting the prep work and grooming that goes on with these somewhat odd teachers, loooong before they step on a mat. It is easy to take real and actual skills, combine them with an ukemi model and mental manipulation and come out a boy wonder. It's a twice told tale that still sucks in otherwise solid people.
Dan

Mental manipulation skills are skills nonetheless.

What if Ueshiba's Aikido was the result of mixing Daito-ryu's Aiki with late XIX and early XX centuries "mentalism" (what showmen like Criss Angel, Derren Brown and other stage magicians do today) probably present in Oomoto spiritual training?

Chris Li
02-24-2012, 10:49 AM
No not just him...them. And that's my point. People really buy this stuff.
It is worth noting the prep work and grooming that goes on with these somewhat odd teachers, loooong before they step on a mat. It is easy to take real and actual skills, combine them with an ukemi model and mental manipulation and come out a boy wonder. It's a twice told tale that still sucks in otherwise solid people.
Dan

And it's not just the odd teachers (although I'm sure some people think that I'm pretty odd) - the entire process of modern ukemi training conditions the bodies of both uke and nage to believe that something that is not happening is actually happening.

In this light, the numerous statements of the old-timers that ukemi taught may take on a whole new light.

Best,

Chris

Marc Abrams
02-24-2012, 11:00 AM
And it's not just the odd teachers (although I'm sure some people think that I'm pretty odd) - the entire process of modern ukemi training conditions the bodies of both uke and nage to believe that something that is not happening is actually happening.

In this light, the numerous statements of the old-timers that ukemi taught may take on a whole new light.

Best,

Chris

My take on what Ellis presented is that the uke experiences are most likely accounted for by what you and Dan are referring to. The other stuff, who knows... In many ways, it is a straw horse. It does not really change the pursuit of understanding and learning IP/Aiki. If there was that supernatural component, then that will become self-evident over time as we pursue the current path of learning. Who was it who said "you don't know, what you don't know" ? ;)

Marc Abrams

vjw
02-24-2012, 11:23 AM
I had a conversation one day about aiki and aptitude where I stated I thought a lot of the success someone could have with learning aiki depended upon their natural aptitude to understand and learn the particulars required. The person I was talking to thought that it was more a matter of attitude or perseverance and work that made a major difference. IMO, all are important, but if you have two people putting in the same level of effort in training, it will be the one with the better aptitude that will excel over the other. Now if you take someone with great aptitude AND extreme attitude coupled with extreme perseverance, you just might end up with an O Sensei or a Sagawa :)

Greg

I think natural aptitude can only account for a miniscule amount of progress compared to perseverance. Some of the people I've met that think they have a natural aptitude to understand aiki, do'nt seem to have the perseverance to do the work to really get there. But then, I might think that as I'm one of those lacking the natural aptitude.:(

Ellis Amdur
02-24-2012, 11:38 AM
Dan - that may very possibly - very likely - be true. That's actually what I believe. I remember the interview where Sagawa snorts in disgust at a question of whether Takeda could flip tatami or pass through walls. I also recall Ueshiba K. demurring when asked about his father's ability to "dodge" bullets, as Shioda more or less describes. (but then he equivocates, fwiw).

What I am saying, however, is that knowledge only comes when you admit a possibility. For example, when I wrote Dueling with Osensei, and wrote the chapter on hapkido, I wrote a commentary on my observations of Daito-ryu. I had only seen the current so-called mainline branch, both under Takeda Tokimune and then later under Kondo. I was pretty mild in my description - the truth is that I cannot begin to express how disappointed I was. THIS was the famous Daito-ryu? I remember sitting in the Budokan as Takeda lay on his back, had different people pin his limbs and one guy put on a cross-collar choke, and then he twitched and they implausibly rolled off in all directions, carefully avoiding bumping in to each other. I was sitting next to a high ranking judoka who was whispering under his breath - "I'd love to be the guy putting on the choke." As some of you may know, I work with police officers, and there is a phenomenon known as "excited delirium." It is a neurological state that creates a berserker rage - including super-human strength, and no sensation of pain. (I've seen footage of a 150 pound naked guy - due to high body temp, which can quickly kill them, they strip off their clothes - with three bullets in him, alligator crawling on feet and hands, with appr. 500 pounds of two officers on his back, and another photo of a several hundred pound grandfather clock thrown threw a picture window and out, thirty feet on the lawn). Yet, in Champaign, Illinois, because the police, who have not been issued TASERS, had to institute physical control and restraint procedures to pin the person to the ground long enough for an EMT to inject Ketamine into them to knock them out. AND four officers, with proper leverage and lots of practice have had universal success in such pinning. So if four people can pin the Incredible Hulk, then I've my doubts about that particular Daito-ryu trick.

So frankly, I wrote off Daito-ryu - and lots of other people I met did so as well. Then a few voices from the fringes - in particular Mike Sigman and Dan Harden and Rob John - started pointing things out that, they asserted, were in Daito-ryu (as well as many other places). And, to give myself a little credit, I suppose, I started a discussion on AJ, which brought other people in, which caused a critical mass of discussion, and others, who only had a small piece might ask, "Hey, what about . . ." And then, IHTBF - and some people felt - and the question of why Ueshiba was so respected, and why Takeda was held in awe - made sense in a way that a view of most current Daito-ryu and aikido didn't. And hence HIPS.

All I am saying is that in the spirit of open inquiry - WITHOUT neglecting one's own training in budo, without negating the IS paradigm of study in the least - or the history of Daito-ryu as clearly underpinning aikido, I think it would be an intriguing exercise to pool together in one place all the accounts of Takeda, of Ueshiba, and of other budo men doing things that are in the shamanistic paradigm. In the end, I bet a lot of them are fiction. Others may be attributed accurately to high level IS skills. But maybe there is something else. It is only in asking an open question, that we admit new info.

Just taking the Mariye Takahashi story - see Aikido Journal - maybe she is just a credulous devotee. But that particular experience has nothing to do with IS type skills. And it intrigues me - what if she is not credulous in that way? What if UEshiba was not a magician who set up some BS table-tipping phenomenon?

To conclude - I'm not saying that you, Dan, for example, must do this sort of study to give creditability to your position regarding Ueshiba and IS. I'm simply saying that some questions are worth asking - if only to take them off the table. Because, it would be a shame if the Aiki/IS paradigm became the "new Orthodoxy."

Best
Ellis

Chris Li
02-24-2012, 12:28 PM
And it's not just the odd teachers (although I'm sure some people think that I'm pretty odd) - the entire process of modern ukemi training conditions the bodies of both uke and nage to believe that something that is not happening is actually happening.

In this light, the numerous statements of the old-timers that ukemi taught may take on a whole new light.

Best,

Chris

I meant "that ukemi was not taught" - I'm going to have to hire a proofreader...

Best,

Chris

gregstec
02-24-2012, 12:30 PM
I think natural aptitude can only account for a miniscule amount of progress compared to perseverance. Some of the people I've met that think they have a natural aptitude to understand aiki, do'nt seem to have the perseverance to do the work to really get there. But then, I might think that as I'm one of those lacking the natural aptitude.:(

Personally, I think that attitude is more important than aptitude in any endeavor, but with all other things considered equal, better aptitude will give someone an edge.

Greg

hughrbeyer
02-24-2012, 09:54 PM
And, all other things held equal, the one who works harder will have an edge.

And you'll never find out if you have the aptitude until you put in the work to find out...

Lee Salzman
02-25-2012, 02:06 AM
And, all other things held equal, the one who works harder will have an edge.

And you'll never find out if you have the aptitude until you put in the work to find out...

But exactly how many angels can dance on the head of a pin? Pointless quibbling about illusory constructs.

As an art, it seems the more pressing debate is can it be proved, not asserted, what Morihei Ueshiba was doing, what was essential and what was superfluous, and how do we replicate that essential ability in ourselves and future students in a reliable way. Make the path clear, and people will follow it. Right now, it is anything but clear, despite the rhetoric. So it is pointless to worry about the character of the students who might be following a method that has yet to be discerned in its totality.

Tom Verhoeven
04-22-2012, 08:08 PM
Thanks to Chris for a VERY thought provoking blog entry...

I just wanted to point out that John Stevens's book Budo Secrets contains text from Ki-ichi Hogen. The selection in Stevens's book is longer (in English) than what Chris included in his blog, but I don't know how different the two texts are in Japanese. In his very short intro to this section, Stevens writes that "These teachings have been widely employed by martial arts instructors over the centuries and are still in use. Morihei Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, often quoted from this list when teaching and demonstrating Aikido techniques, and so did my Aikido teacher Rinjiro Shirata."

Matt Fisher
Allegheny Aikido
Pittsburgh, PA

FWIW and just to elaborate a bit; In the early eighties Tamura sensei did teach Aikido while explaining Hogen's scroll of the tiger. He showed how to apply the ideas/principles and explained how O Sensei often quoted the scroll of the tiger.
Shigenobu Okumura translated the text in English and published it somewhere in the eighties (if I remember correctly) in the newsletter of Hombu dojo "The Aikido".

Tom

Chris Li
04-22-2012, 08:18 PM
FWIW and just to elaborate a bit; In the early eighties Tamura sensei did teach Aikido while explaining Hogen's scroll of the tiger. He showed how to apply the ideas/principles and explained how O Sensei often quoted the scroll of the tiger.
Shigenobu Okumura translated the text in English and published it somewhere in the eighties (if I remember correctly) in the newsletter of Hombu dojo "The Aikido".

Tom

So...what did they say, and what was Tamura's application of the principles?

Best,

Chris

PeterR
04-22-2012, 11:25 PM
What I am saying, however, is that knowledge only comes when you admit a possibility. For example, when I wrote Dueling with Osensei, and wrote the chapter on hapkido, I wrote a commentary on my observations of Daito-ryu. I had only seen the current so-called mainline branch, both under Takeda Tokimune and then later under Kondo. I was pretty mild in my description - the truth is that I cannot begin to express how disappointed I was. THIS was the famous Daito-ryu? I remember sitting in the Budokan as Takeda lay on his back, had different people pin his limbs and one guy put on a cross-collar choke, and then he twitched and they implausibly rolled off in all directions, carefully avoiding bumping in to each other. I was sitting next to a high ranking judoka who was whispering under his breath - "I'd love to be the guy putting on the choke."
I wonder if you were at the same demonstration described here :D

http://homepage2.nifty.com/shodokan/en/oshie3.html


About the same time there was some special training with a Daitoryu Aikijujitsu teacher in the small dojo in the Japan Budokan and we joined in immediately. During his demonstration he showed a technique that left an impression on me in particular. He was spread-eagled face up on the tatami with four people holding his ankles and wrists and in an instant these four people were thrown off. We had difficulty believing this because it was difficult enough against just one person in randori practice or a match. It was a very strange spectacle but the talk of all my fellow students was that it didn't appear to be a fake technique. Later I asked Tomiki Shihan about it and his unexpected reply was, "I can do that anytime!". However, straight away I didn't believe him and doubt remained somewhere in my mind.

In July 1979, more than ten years later, the 2nd All Japan Competitive Aikido Meeting was held following on from the previous year. It was organised by the JAA and took place in Shihan's home town of Kakunodate in Akita prefecture. He had only just made a comeback from abdominal surgery in August of the previous year and taught with bandages wrapped around his abdomen. I was nominated as his uke for both days. It was an opportunity for him to show me the technique that I had been shown more than ten years earlier by the Daitoryu teacher. He did it very easily and without effort. Once again, needless to say, I was astonished at the depth of techniques.


Tetsuro Nariyama wrote the above and I have seen him do the same but I would not describe the movement as a twitch just minimal. I will say I was not one of the people holding onto his limbs for that particular demonstration but I have no doubt that those that did were earnest they being cut from the same cloth as Nariyama (ie. prove it).

Anyway - the point being that there is a healthy disbelief out there along with the disappointment with some of the "magic" techniques. When seeing these things one can not be in so much awe that you don't try it yourself (please don't ask how that went) and you should be able to see what is actually happening. This way you should be able to separate the wheat from the chaff with respect to "actual" vs "fake" techniques.

Chris Li
03-22-2014, 11:48 AM
Now available in Romanian (http://www.aikido-jurnal.ro/index.php?pagina=art_138), courtesy of Aikido Jurnal. The original English version is available here (http://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/kiichi-hogen-secret-aikido/).

Best,

Chris

Chris Li
05-19-2017, 02:37 PM
Now available in German (http://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/kiichi-hogen-und-das-geheimnis-des-aikido-german-version/), courtesy of Ian Eisterer. The original English version is available on the Aikido Sangenkai​ blog (http://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/kiichi-hogen-secret-aikido/).

Best,

Chris