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hughrbeyer
06-01-2011, 10:28 PM
Hey all -- I've been working on pulling together video clips from Gleason Sensei's latest seminar at Baltimore Aikido. The first one is up on our YouTube channel (http://youtu.be/FukKoRaf5KA). More will follow as we get them done, and eventually there will be a more comprehensive DVD.

Dan has mentioned on this forum that Gleason Sensei has been working with him for the past few years, so it might be worthwhile to point out that this is not a demo of Dan's aiki. You'll still have to go to him for that. :) This is Sensei's own interpretation of Aikido, incorporating Dan's principles into his own 40 years of experience.

DH
06-02-2011, 06:23 AM
I always enjoy watching Bill work. He cracks me up in that he doesn't look like he is doing much. His hands and arms look lax, almost empty but when you run into those hands of his; it's either a hole or...bam...a 2x4 in your face! If you watch Bill's touch on the arms or neck of that uke, you can see the weight dropping on the guy while Bill keeps his energy in himself.

I've seen some interesting changes in feel over the last year alone. What I have experienced with him is that he is getting softer, more precise, and more powerful. He is a very dedicated workman and works his butt off on his own when no one is watching. I would be willing to bet his students don't put in the same time on their own as he does.
I can't wait to see what he does over the next five years. He is just simply not going to stop. He has the hunger of a 1st kyu still "going after the ring."

We were talking a couple of months ago about his students, and progress and stages in training, and expectations students have and he said "Well, they can keep chasing this old man."
At 67 His body has the tone of a 45 yr. old and his mind is even younger....wait......I hate that guy!:freaky:
Cheers
Dan

graham christian
06-02-2011, 06:33 AM
Hey all -- I've been working on pulling together video clips from Gleason Sensei's latest seminar at Baltimore Aikido. The first one is up on our YouTube channel (http://youtu.be/FukKoRaf5KA). More will follow as we get them done, and eventually there will be a more comprehensive DVD.

Dan has mentioned on this forum that Gleason Sensei has been working with him for the past few years, so it might be worthwhile to point out that this is not a demo of Dan's aiki. You'll still have to go to him for that. :) This is Sensei's own interpretation of Aikido, incorporating Dan's principles into his own 40 years of experience.

Yep. That gets the thumbs up from me.

Regards.G.

gregstec
06-02-2011, 08:36 AM
Hey all -- I've been working on pulling together video clips from Gleason Sensei's latest seminar at Baltimore Aikido. The first one is up on our YouTube channel (http://youtu.be/FukKoRaf5KA). More will follow as we get them done, and eventually there will be a more comprehensive DVD.

Dan has mentioned on this forum that Gleason Sensei has been working with him for the past few years, so it might be worthwhile to point out that this is not a demo of Dan's aiki. You'll still have to go to him for that. :) This is Sensei's own interpretation of Aikido, incorporating Dan's principles into his own 40 years of experience.

As an independent Aikiko practitioner and as student of Dan's, I have had the opportunity to be on the mat with Bill at Dan's seminars as well as at Bill's own seminars. What I see is that more and more Bill is taking the concepts and principles of what Dan is teaching and is incorporating them into his Aikido techniques - Bill's focus is not on the techniques but more on the aiki within them.

For those that want to get a glimpse into what Dan is doing with aiki and cannot get to one of his seminars, go to one of Bill's - or Howard Popkins'; since Howard is doing the same thing with his Daito Ryu techniques.

Greg

gregstec
06-02-2011, 08:46 AM
At 67 His body has the tone of a 45 yr. old and his mind is even younger....wait......I hate that guy!:freaky:
Cheers
Dan

Folks, don't let Dan's comment above mislead you on his conditioning - at 54 or 55, Dan makes the energizer bunny look old and run down! Dan has on occasion been carried off the mat, not because he was wore out, but to stop him from training when everyone else just could not move anymore :)

(oops, did I use the word 'bunny' in an Aikido forum, sorry :freaky: )

Greg

jester
06-02-2011, 08:50 AM
Very nice videos Hugh.

I have a question that has always stuck with me and seeing this instructor reminded me about it.

I don't know who this is but he never seems to stays focused on his Uke after he throws. It seems flippant to me. I see a few instructors do this. They throw Uke but have no Zanshin afterwards.

Teaching situational awareness is a big part of martial arts but I don't see that aspect being taught here. I'm sure he might have it but he doesn't seem to teach it in these videos. I know other instructors that stay focused on Uke until he recovers and that's what I was always taught in any of the arts I've studied.

It seems that habits like this would be hard to break once ingrained in your teaching methods. If you get a chance can you ask him why he does this?

Thanks

-

Cliff Judge
06-02-2011, 08:55 AM
Hugh, did you guys move the shomen and/or get new windows in there?

gregstec
06-02-2011, 09:44 AM
Very nice videos Hugh.

I have a question that has always stuck with me and seeing this instructor reminded me about it.

I don't know who this is but he never seems to stays focused on his Uke after he throws. It seems flippant to me. I see a few instructors do this. They throw Uke but have no Zanshin afterwards.

Teaching situational awareness is a big part of martial arts but I don't see that aspect being taught here. I'm sure he might have it but he doesn't seem to teach it in these videos. I know other instructors that stay focused on Uke until he recovers and that's what I was always taught in any of the arts I've studied.

It seems that habits like this would be hard to break once ingrained in your teaching methods. If you get a chance can you ask him why he does this?

Thanks

-

I don't intend to speak for Bill, but I can comment from my perspective. First, these are demos at a seminar with a very specific topic being addressed and Zanshin is not the topic. Second, you do not have to look at something to remain aware of it - IMO, there is much more to Zanshin that a physical look. :)

Greg

jester
06-02-2011, 10:55 AM
First, these are demos at a seminar with a very specific topic being addressed and Zanshin is not the topic.

Greg

I looked at some more of his videos and he's pretty focused so you are probably right. Just not what I'm used to seeing.

Thanks

gregstec
06-02-2011, 11:07 AM
I looked at some more of his videos and he's pretty focused so you are probably right. Just not what I'm used to seeing.

Thanks

Different folks, different strokes :)

Greg

hughrbeyer
06-02-2011, 11:34 AM
...he never seems to stays focused on his Uke after he throws. It seems flippant to me... If you get a chance can you ask him why he does this?

I might be a bit shy of suggesting that he's flippant. :hypno: I've always interpreted this as Japanese manners, but I don't actually know if that's the case. When he's throwing you around during practice or after class, he's totally focused on you--in fact, you often find him right on top of you as you finish your roll--until he's done, at which point he often just turns around and walks away. Same when he's using you to demonstrate--he's focused on the class and expects you to attack or hold off without a lot of explicit cues from him.

@Cliff, this is Baltimore, not Boston.

@Dan, yeah, that "I'm just walking in the park and people are falling on their ass all around me" aspect is one of the things I love about his aikido. A few other guys seem to have it -- for two, Kisaburo Ohsawa and a guy by the name of Numata, who I know nothing about but I ran across on YouTube (http://youtu.be/O4jUbj1Dvkc). Anyone know who he is? I'd love to know more about him.

jester
06-02-2011, 12:32 PM
I might be a bit shy of suggesting that he's flippant. :hypno: I've always interpreted this as Japanese manners, but I don't actually know if that's the case.

Thanks Hugh. I looked up his bio and he trained/lived in Japan for some time so you might be right.

-

Cliff Judge
06-02-2011, 01:03 PM
@Cliff, this is Baltimore, not Boston.


Right right....you are from Boston, you shot the video in Baltimore a couple of months ago, so you have no idea if they changed their dojo around. Perhaps I should head up there and check it out for myself.

Cliff Judge
06-02-2011, 01:16 PM
I know other instructors that stay focused on Uke until he recovers and that's what I was always taught in any of the arts I've studied.


So you haven't trained in multi-attacker scenarios?

Ernesto Lemke
06-02-2011, 04:29 PM
As a side note, I recall someone stating there is an upcoming interview with Gleason Sensei on AJ. Anyone has any ideas when that's due?

aikilouis
06-02-2011, 04:35 PM
William Gleason published two detailed books on aikido's spiritual side, particularly about kototama (sp ?).

Could Dan or any of the people who practise with him tell if and how he combines his knowledge with his study of IS/IT/IP ? Does he talk about it ?

DH
06-02-2011, 04:51 PM
As a side note, I recall someone stating there is an upcoming interview with Gleason Sensei on AJ. Anyone has any ideas when that's due?

Crickets.....

Some people have been busy lately

DH
06-02-2011, 04:52 PM
William Gleason published two detailed books on aikido's spiritual side, particularly about kototama (sp ?).

Could Dan or any of the people who practise with him tell if and how he combines his knowledge with his study of IS/IT/IP ? Does he talk about it ?
There is talk of a revised edition coming out...I wil leave that up to Bill to talk about.
Cheers
Dan

jester
06-02-2011, 06:08 PM
So you haven't trained in multi-attacker scenarios?

Beyond the scope of this course.

-

MM
06-02-2011, 08:08 PM
Figures that a thread about Bill would bring me to post here. I can't encourage people enough to get out and train with Bill or go to one of his seminars.

Out of all the people in aikido today, I think Bill is one who has the chance to not only equal Ueshiba's skills, but surpass them.

He cares about his students. So much so, that he started them on a path to get Ueshiba's aiki even when some, either did not like it or could not understand it. But Bill was giving them a pot of gold, a Holy Grail, a singular diamond that is priceless and he was doing his utmost best to see that they got the very best training he could provide. The quality of Bill's teaching is that THE only reason his students won't surpass him is because the student, or students, won't put in the training time.

People flock to the Japanese shihan over and over again, but come away complaining about lack of effective communication for describing how to train aiki skills. Bill has great communication abilities and has the background of training in Japan. Want to walk away from a seminar with quality training and direct and concise details about where to go in your training? Go to one of Bill's seminars.

When people look back at these days and ask who were the aikido greats of our time, Bill's name will be at the top of the list. As you can read, I think very highly of Bill. He is the future of Morihei Ueshiba's aikido. Ignore that if you will, but as far as I'm concerned, most of the rest of the Japanese shihan are Kisshomaru/Tohei students who have a very different aikido than the founder. That isn't negative or bad, just a fact. If you want that kind of aikido, it's there. Nothing negative about training it. But if you want to try to replicate, equal, or surpass Morihei Ueshiba's aikido, I'd go train with Bill. Not only is he chasing it, but he's got all the right qualities to catch it, have it, surpass it, and effectively pass it on.

Mark

SteveTrinkle
06-06-2011, 07:55 PM
... and a guy by the name of Numata, who I know nothing about but I ran across on YouTube (http://youtu.be/O4jUbj1Dvkc). Anyone know who he is? I'd love to know more about him.

Hello Hugh - Numata Sensei (7 dan) He's a student of Takeda Yoshinubu Sensei. Numata Sensei also trained with Yamaguchi Sensei. I'm sure Bill Sensei knows him well from Kamakura.

Hope all's well up there!

Jory Boling
06-08-2011, 04:55 PM
A few other guys seem to have it -- for two, Kisaburo Ohsawa and a guy by the name of Numata, who I know nothing about but I ran across on YouTube (http://youtu.be/O4jUbj1Dvkc). Anyone know who he is? I'd love to know more about him.

Hello. Numata Sensei is one of my main teachers. His dojo
is in Yokosuka, Japan.
Numata Dojo (http://yokosukaaikido.com/index.php)

hughrbeyer
06-08-2011, 08:03 PM
Ooh, thanks. Good to know. If there are more vids of his aikido, I'd love to see them.

Tony Wagstaffe
06-10-2011, 10:01 AM
Had a good look at his videos and can't see much or very little difference in what we do in Tomiki/Shodokan.... What's all the fuss about? If that is IP/IS? Then many Shodokan people have it anyway....
No big deal, but then again I expect you all to disagree.....:rolleyes:
Looking at most of the attacks I would say they lack intent anyway, but that's nothing new....

hughrbeyer
06-10-2011, 01:38 PM
Tony! You're back! Whereya been, dude, been missing you. :D

Tony Wagstaffe
06-10-2011, 01:40 PM
Tony! You're back! Whereya been, dude, been missing you. :D

You big fibber you!!!!:D

thisisnotreal
06-10-2011, 10:47 PM
I quite liked this one. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHpym3zdr5M&feature=related

thisisnotreal
06-10-2011, 10:55 PM
His hands and arms look lax, almost empty but when you run into those hands of his; it's either a hole or...bam...a 2x4 in your face! If you watch Bill's touch on the arms or neck of that uke, you can see the weight dropping on the guy while Bill keeps his energy in himself.


..yeah, that "I'm just walking in the park and people are falling on their ass all around me" aspect is one of the things I love about his aikido.

so uh... yeah. that is amazing. It is rather striking.

hughrbeyer
06-13-2011, 10:02 PM
Another one: http://youtu.be/_16CoXLMxCs

Jory Boling
06-14-2011, 06:50 AM
Another one: http://youtu.be/_16CoXLMxCs

Nice video. It's nice to see some familiar movements in other parts of the world.

Carsten Möllering
06-14-2011, 07:27 AM
Nice video. It's nice to see some familiar movements in other parts of the world. :) That's exactly what I thought when watching the posted vidoes of William Gleason.
I don't know whether I see what he is doing. Or wether I see, what I want to see. But it looks very familiar.

Robert A. Wilkins
06-21-2011, 09:39 AM
Very nice videos Hugh.

I have a question that has always stuck with me and seeing this instructor reminded me about it.

I don't know who this is but he never seems to stays focused on his Uke after he throws. It seems flippant to me. I see a few instructors do this. They throw Uke but have no Zanshin afterwards.

Teaching situational awareness is a big part of martial arts but I don't see that aspect being taught here. I'm sure he might have it but he doesn't seem to teach it in these videos. I know other instructors that stay focused on Uke until he recovers and that's what I was always taught in any of the arts I've studied.

It seems that habits like this would be hard to break once ingrained in your teaching methods. If you get a chance can you ask him why he does this?

Thanks

-

As for Gleason Sensei not seeming "focused" on uke after executing a technique, I can say such is not the case. Gleason Sensei knows what's going on on every part of the mat, this too has been my personal experience with him. I've seen him standing on one end of the mat and the next instant he's off to the far corner of the mat correcting something he saw. I've also seen Gleason Sensei finish his pins by completely immobilizing and holding his ukes down for several minutes whilst they struggled to get back up.

So while it may "appear" to you that Gleason Sensei lacks the requisite amount of zanshin, I can say, as someone who has swung a bokken at him for a while now, that such is not the case.

SteveTrinkle
06-21-2011, 09:55 AM
As for Gleason Sensei not seeming "focused" on uke after executing a technique, I can say such is not the case. Gleason Sensei knows what's going on on every part of the mat, this too has been my personal experience with him. I've seen him standing on one end of the mat and the next instant he's off to the far corner of the mat correcting something he saw. I've also seen Gleason Sensei finish his pins by completely immobilizing and holding his ukes down for several minutes whilst they struggled to get back up.

So while it may "appear" to you that Gleason Sensei lacks the requisite amount of zanshin, I can say, as someone who has swung a bokken at him for a while now, that such is not the case.

I second the above. In my experience, when I've been thrown by Gleason Sensei, there's never any chance of escaping afterwards. He's always stayed very "connected" to me. Also, maybe take a look at some videos of his teacher, yamaguchi Sensei - people used to complain of how "sticky" he was - they could not get away. Gleason Sensei is great at this.

DH
06-21-2011, 12:45 PM
I second the above. In my experience, when I've been thrown by Gleason Sensei, there's never any chance of escaping afterwards. He's always stayed very "connected" to me. Also, maybe take a look at some videos of his teacher, yamaguchi Sensei - people used to complain of how "sticky" he was - they could not get away. Gleason Sensei is great at this.
More interesting is that stickyness is a known quality and a known side effect of very specific training, so is heavy hands. Ya don't have to train for twenty to thirty years in "hopes" of getting it, and more than likely not at all.
Cheers
Dan

SteveTrinkle
06-21-2011, 01:41 PM
More interesting is that stickyness is a known quality and a known side effect of very specific training, so is heavy hands. Ya don't have to train for twenty to thirty years in "hopes" of getting it, and more than likely not at all.
Cheers
Dan

"Heavy hands" - that is a great description of the feeling. Now where else have I felt that recently...?