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harveyr4
03-31-2011, 09:17 PM
Hey,

As I said in an earlier post, I'm new to the forum and Aikido.

I was wondering which other martial art form would be a good choice to go with Aikido? What I'm look for is a art the would not be a role around on the floor art, I'm sure they are great arts but just not for me. I have thought about Kung Fu. I like Aikido but would like some attack moves added into it. My way of thinking is, the more I keep an attacker off of my body the better. That is why I like the Aikido art forum. Does anybody have any feed back or thoughts about this?

ninjaqutie
03-31-2011, 09:37 PM
Trying to learn more then one intricate style of martial art at the same time may prove problematic to you. You may want to focus on one style for a while and then maybe train in something else later.

As far as styles, depends on what you want. You said you don't want ground fighting, but there are still tons of options for you to consider: karate, tae kwon do, tang soo do, kung fu, silat, hapkido, aikijitsu, ninjitsu, etc, etc, etc...

harveyr4
03-31-2011, 09:45 PM
Thinks for the info, I don't really know what all those other styles are. Are there a page or site I can go to and see a short description of each style?

ninjaqutie
03-31-2011, 11:52 PM
I'm not aware of one place that describes all of those, but a quick google or wikipedia search should help. A lot of aikido people seem to come from aikijitsu or judo backgrounds and some aikido people like hapkido, but really the decision is up to you. I'm personally a huge fan of aikijitsu. Trained in it for about 7 years before starting aikido. It has some aikido and judo techniques, as well as jujitsu and punching and kicking. Or at least my dojo did. My dojo also did traditional hand and weapon kata involving bo, jo, sword, sai, tonfa and chucks. I enjoyed doing things such as choke breaks and bear hug throws. There are people much more qualified then I am who could tell you more about that style.

Michael Hackett
04-01-2011, 12:11 AM
Harvey,

You might want to consider Yoseikan Budo. Mochizuki Sensei was a student of Ueshiba O Sensei and incorporated a number of the traditional arts into a rather comprehensive form. You can do a quick Google search for Yoseikan or Patrick Auge Sensei. That might give you some information you're interested in.

SeiserL
04-01-2011, 04:16 AM
IMHO, the arts you study don't matter as much as your ability to keep them separate in training and thought until such time that they begin to integrate by themselves.

SteliosPapadakis
04-01-2011, 06:27 AM
In principle, a Samurai could (well enough and with the appropriate care)serve one master at a time.
:D

grondahl
04-01-2011, 06:45 AM
But as to my limited knowledge they could train in several martial disciplines at the same time. And your local "sensei" isnīt a daimyo.

In principle, a Samurai could (well enough and with the appropriate care)serve one master at a time.
:D

SteliosPapadakis
04-01-2011, 06:52 AM
But as to my limited knowledge they could train in several martial disciplines at the same time.

Very true, Peter. Cannot dissagree. But, IMHO (and IMHO and cosmotheory only) one cannot master something if at the same time he is involved in doing several other things. Just a personal view on life...

And your local "sensei" isnīt a daimyo.

YOU tell him that!
:D

harveyr4
04-01-2011, 06:56 AM
Hey guys,
thanks for the input. But I wasn't meaning trying to take them both at the same time. I don't really have time to do that. Just an idea of what other kind of style to take in the future. The other factor is I don't really like to use weapons. I like the thought of just using my body, hands, legs, etc... With Aikido You can take down an attacker very quickly and break bones at the same time. As far as an attacker goes, I want to take them down as quickly as possible, break bones and make a quick shot to the nose all in one type of motion. I know this sound bad, but if someone wants to attack someone to hurt, still, or kill them, than I want them to fill pain and to think twice about ever attacking anyone again. I like Aikido and will take that style, but would like to take an other style to add the attack style into Aikido.

Mark Peckett
04-01-2011, 08:16 AM
If you're interested in effectively taking down and winning in fights, then judo/jujitsu seems to be the way to go. Curtis Sliwa, founder of the Guardian Angels said judo was the best martial art as 9 out of 10 fights end up rolling round on the floor, and BJJ springs from the same philosophy.
If you want to pop someone in the nose, wado ryu karate was founded by a jujitsu master and has a lot of the nagashi/diverting principles of aikido - plus hitting and kicking!
Filipino eskrima uses a lot of the same locks as aikido and includes devastating finishes, as does hapkido.
All of these arts can inform your practice, including being aware of how other arts can counter what you're doing in your aikido, but ...
personally, I'd wait until you're really secure in one art like aikido before you move to another. The differences will interfere with your practice of both arts otherwise.

lbb
04-01-2011, 08:25 AM
If you're thinking about what might be an interesting style somewhere down the road, I'd say don't bother to look for a style based on your perceived present-day needs. Right now you're thinking of a hypothetical self-defense scenario, which may or may not be realistic, and of "teaching a lesson" to your attacker...no beef with that, but people who try to draw conclusions based on what they're going to feel ten years from now, are operating on bad data. So I'd say don't try to make a utilitarian choice, or really any choice at this time. Instead, just spend some time learning more about different styles. Donn Draeger's "Comprehensive Asian Fighting Arts" is a great place to start, and then you can spin off from there, depending on where your interest takes you.

matty_mojo911
04-04-2011, 10:03 PM
Hi Harvey

My advice to new students is always the same "what do you want out of the art? (either Aikido, or whatever). If you have an answer then you just need to find what art meets the need. Wikipedia, youtube, or the local library - are your main sources.

It also massively depends on your type of personality - for example a Karate style might fit but when you see them train you say "Holy Hell I'm not doing that crazy stuff!!!!" Aikido generally attracts a more passive, peaceful person - generally.

However if you want to be an ace fighter, able to defend yourself well this is what you need: A never say die attitude, train really hard (in whatever style), train a stand up style (kickboxing, or Muay Thai - so you learn how to take apunch), a ground style (BJJ is king in this field) and a throwing style - Aikido or Judo. I'm not a fan of Kung Fu styles - a lot of flash and not a lot of substance. Harsh I know. Those are my thoughts - good luck.

lbb
04-05-2011, 06:19 AM
Yeah, we all know about those horrible violent karateka...

oisin bourke
04-05-2011, 06:29 AM
Hey,

As I said in an earlier post, I'm new to the forum and Aikido.

I was wondering which other martial art form would be a good choice to go with Aikido? What I'm look for is a art the would not be a role around on the floor art, I'm sure they are great arts but just not for me. I have thought about Kung Fu. I like Aikido but would like some attack moves added into it. My way of thinking is, the more I keep an attacker off of my body the better. That is why I like the Aikido art forum. Does anybody have any feed back or thoughts about this?

I'm becoming convinced that the art/style is not as important as the teacher. Don't worry too much about the style. Look around your area and if you can find an excellent technician who can explain their art reasonably well who also happens to be a decent human being, then go with that.

phitruong
04-05-2011, 07:55 AM
Yeah, we all know about those horrible violent karateka...

saw quite a few karateka screaming and yelling and beating up these defenseless makiwara. what a bunch of nut jobs! :D

Mark Freeman
04-05-2011, 09:07 AM
Aikido generally attracts a more passive, peaceful person - generally.
.

Hi Matt,

I see you are new to Aikiweb then:D

Generally I agree with the points that you made though.

regards

Mark

Marc Abrams
04-05-2011, 09:49 AM
saw quite a few karateka screaming and yelling and beating up these defenseless makiwara. what a bunch of nut jobs! :D

Phil:

You think that's nuts! I saw a bunch of screaming and yelling makiwara beating up a bunch of defenseless karateka..........:freaky:

Marc

lbb
04-05-2011, 10:11 AM
Phil:

You think that's nuts! I saw a bunch of screaming and yelling makiwara beating up a bunch of defenseless karateka..........:freaky:

Marc

Buncha babies. Around here, we cut the makiwara down and burn 'em!

(we have to...to stay warm...what is this "spring" of which you speak?)

Larry Feldman
04-05-2011, 03:12 PM
I agree with Oisin, it's the teacher.

Being in Arkansas I suspect your options may be more limited than say Los Angelos. Go find who is available in your area and make your decision based on that.

Walter Martindale
04-05-2011, 08:45 PM
Hey guys,
thanks for the input. But I wasn't meaning trying to take them both at the same time. I don't really have time to do that. Just an idea of what other kind of style to take in the future. The other factor is I don't really like to use weapons. I like the thought of just using my body, hands, legs, etc... With Aikido You can take down an attacker very quickly and break bones at the same time. As far as an attacker goes, I want to take them down as quickly as possible, break bones and make a quick shot to the nose all in one type of motion. I know this sound bad, but if someone wants to attack someone to hurt, still, or kill them, than I want them to fill pain and to think twice about ever attacking anyone again. I like Aikido and will take that style, but would like to take an other style to add the attack style into Aikido.

Martial Art click-clack-pow... click - pull slide back. clack - release slide. pow - squeeze trigger with implement pointing at center of mass. repeat pow until threat is ended.
Or run like hell. (a better option - speshully where I live 'cause it's agin the law to 'carry'.) Best training for self defense is to be able to run like the wind and get the hell away from the attacker. Or run him or her over if he or she is blocking your escape route. Develop a 100 m sprint followed by a 5 km run - most people can't follow that... If the attacker catches you, you're in trouble, and it would be to your advantage to be able to defend yourself with whatever works. Some people find that Aikido is suitable.

W

what time zone is this aikiweb server based in - says here my post was sent at 2:45 PM but it was 10:45 PM here in Ontario... Hawaii? Last time I asked Jun he told me it was based in the mountain time zone but that can't be right...

Walter Martindale
04-06-2011, 05:58 AM
what time zone is this aikiweb server based in - says here my post was sent at 2:45 PM but it was 10:45 PM here in Ontario... Hawaii? Last time I asked Jun he told me it was based in the mountain time zone but that can't be right...

Jun answered me in a personal message. My personal settings still had me in New Zealand... Oops.
Thanks Jun.

aikidoka81
03-28-2012, 10:43 PM
Hey,

As I said in an earlier post, I'm new to the forum and Aikido.

I was wondering which other martial art form would be a good choice to go with Aikido? What I'm look for is a art the would not be a role around on the floor art, I'm sure they are great arts but just not for me. I have thought about Kung Fu. I like Aikido but would like some attack moves added into it. My way of thinking is, the more I keep an attacker off of my body the better. That is why I like the Aikido art forum. Does anybody have any feed back or thoughts about this?

You can learn sword martial arts like Iaido or Kendo to compliment your Aikido since Aikido also teaches sword and the hand strikes are based on sword movements. I've thought about learning that before but later decided to just focus on Aikido so that I can improve my Aikido faster. Kung Fu is different from Aikido and you may mix up or confuse the techniques so it's advisable not to.

D-Ring
03-29-2012, 04:38 PM
I was wondering which other martial art form would be a good choice to go with Aikido? What I'm look for is a art the would not be a role around on the floor art, I'm sure they are great arts but just not for me.

Harvey, my suggestion is that you might look for a good teacher rather than a specific style. I've taken a few different MA along the way and I've noticed my success and enjoyment usually have much more to do with the teacher and the other students that it does with whatever the name on the door is. Even in places where MA schools abound you may only find one or two teachers who are experienced, mature and really know what their art is about. Good aikido will serve you in wherever you go next.

That said, I've recently quit rolling around on the ground as well. A wise man adapts to the limitations of his body. : )

Peace,
Dave

Zoe S Toth
03-29-2012, 06:17 PM
Hey,

As I said in an earlier post, I'm new to the forum and Aikido.

I was wondering which other martial art form would be a good choice to go with Aikido? What I'm look for is a art the would not be a role around on the floor art, I'm sure they are great arts but just not for me. I have thought about Kung Fu. I like Aikido but would like some attack moves added into it. My way of thinking is, the more I keep an attacker off of my body the better. That is why I like the Aikido art forum. Does anybody have any feed back or thoughts about this?

Hello!

I hate to tell you but if you want to go offensive, you'll need to understand ground and standing fighting. A dojo mate of mine and I do this all the time. He and another girl at my dojo did karate- so they do 'tap fighting' from time to time. He does fine dealing with her. My background is in kicks and ground fighting and this is what happens:

If he manages to keep it a standing fighting focusing on the fist he wins.

If I manage to bring in more kicks, I either get a good one in and its over OR its a sweep, we bring it to the ground and I choke him out.

My advice is budo is not a short term goal- O'Sensei was highly skilled at multiple arts. He didn't learn that in a few years but rather over his life.

Good luck.

Henrypsim
03-29-2012, 09:17 PM
Must have done something wrong. I thought I send in my opinion but did not see it. So here it goes again.

I would suggest you consider I Liq Chuan (ILC). The Sifu's name is Sam Chin, resides in New York but gives seminars around the country and other foreign lands.

ILC's principles of yin and yang, ground path, awareness, ki etc coincides with what O-Sensei's main focus was in teaching Aikido. O-Sensei has said that without those same principles, you are not learning Aikido. Unfortunately most modern day Aikido senseis and students only practice Ai-Do which in essence ..... useless against anyone who is bigger, stronger or knows a bit of "something".

Benjamin Green
03-30-2012, 12:37 AM
Do whatever you think you'd most dislike to fight as. Fighting in situations where you're totally comfortable isn't something that takes much practising.

Personally I'd recommend boxing or muay thai, something like that. What they do isn't pretty - the latter's become virtually synonymous with brutality - but the experience of things being a total mess and having to keep going is well worth getting.

PeterR
03-30-2012, 12:43 AM
You try some of this - you try some of that and then one day you find what you really want to do and concentrate on that. Then after a few years you add in something else to help you understand your choice a bit better.

Observations.

You may end up in an art far different from what you would have thought.

The teacher is far more important than the art. Its inspiration coupled with the ability to transmit.

No teacher of any worth studied only one thing.

Gorgeous George
03-30-2012, 07:00 PM
Hey guys,
thanks for the input. But I wasn't meaning trying to take them both at the same time. I don't really have time to do that. Just an idea of what other kind of style to take in the future. The other factor is I don't really like to use weapons. I like the thought of just using my body, hands, legs, etc... With Aikido You can take down an attacker very quickly and break bones at the same time. As far as an attacker goes, I want to take them down as quickly as possible, break bones and make a quick shot to the nose all in one type of motion. I know this sound bad, but if someone wants to attack someone to hurt, still, or kill them, than I want them to fill pain and to think twice about ever attacking anyone again. I like Aikido and will take that style, but would like to take an other style to add the attack style into Aikido.

If you're interested in real-life self-defence, as opposed to the likes of karate, taekwondo, aikido, and - to an extent: judo - I recommend you check out the Gracie Challenge stuff:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDdVTFyhorY&feature=player_embedded

I think the determination is that clinching/grappling is where most fights end up, hence striking is - literally - quite hit and miss. Grappling allows you to save energy, and safely subdue an aggressor; whereas smashing someone up is quite energy inefficient, and quite possibly illegal.

...but as you don't want to 'roll around', i'd say judo fits your criteria for 'taking an attacker down very quickly and breaking their bones'.
As you'll spar with resisting opponents, by the time you come up against someone 'on the street' (quite possibly never), you'll find it child's play to put them on the ground.

But after a few months/years, you'll quite possibly find yourself asking if all the training is for the sake of such imaginary encounters - or whether you're training for some other reason.
It's a hell of a lot of time and effort you'll spend to become 'street lethal'...you might want to get something else out of it - and after a relatively brief period of training, you will probably have no further need to train to overcome bums in the street: then you'll ask yourself why you should bother training any longer...

And if you're thinking of self-defence: for the love of God, don't think of aikido - or anything that lacks sparring/randori.