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dps
03-07-2011, 02:49 PM
Aikido Aikibojitsu and the Structure of Natural Law
by John Thomas Read

http://www.aikibojitsu.com/BookPage.html

I am trying to decide whether to buy this book.

To that end I want to know if my understanding of this excerpt from the book (http://www.aikibojitsu.com/files/Asymptotic_Surface_2.pdf) is correct.

Simply put the katas are a way of tuning or harmonizing the practitioner's body with the bo or jo so that the practitioner "becomes one" with the bo or jo.

dps

crbateman
03-07-2011, 04:08 PM
I have the book, and I must confess that I've had a hard time getting my head around much of it, partly because I'm not a physicist, and partly because I have not previously tried to decipher the techniques I do into this much matter-of-fact science. It's definitely a thought-provoking read (until your head explodes), but I don't honestly know how much or how little it might help my Aikido training. Only time will tell.

Tenyu
03-07-2011, 04:16 PM
David,

The most important book on Aikido ever written.

For my 'antagonists', you still have to buy the book to prove me wrong! :p

-Tenyu

I gave my honest assessment of the book. Any ad hom replies will be ignored in advance.

jbblack
03-07-2011, 04:20 PM
I have the book and it is quite interesting.

graham christian
03-07-2011, 05:14 PM
Looks good to me. Well done Sensei Read.

dps
03-07-2011, 06:43 PM
I learned electronics and radio communications in the Air Force. I also have an associate degree in electrical/electronic engineering technology and have designed and built antennas though nothing in the microwave range.

From my viewpoint the body is a signal generator, the arms are the transmissions lines and the staff is the antenna. It seems that you are trying to tune the system ( generator, tx lines, antenna or body, arms, staff) to the same frequency.
I think that the explanation of microwave waveguides is confusing as the vibrations talked about are no where near the frequencies of microwaves. Plus the frequency of the staff is a mechanical vibration not an electrical-magnetic vibration.

I am still trying to figure out what "attenuated activation" is. What are you attenuating and what are you activating?

How does this help my Aikido?

Any help?

dps

Tenyu
03-07-2011, 08:24 PM
David,

Attenuation is my concept, it's not in the book. I can't explain its application without describing how to do it which I already stated I'm not going to do publicly. It's not something you should be concerned with.

The electrical analogies of non-resistance, load matching(nage to uke), and infinite impedance are relevant to Aikido and are thoroughly explained in the book.

-Tenyu

danj
03-07-2011, 10:17 PM
There was a previous thread discussing the book here
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19392&highlight=aikibojitsu

My thoughts then were the use of the technical terms were a little misleading to those familiar with them and might present a barrier. Thus at some point the analogy my cease to be helpful but if it helps some thats great.

of course i haven't read the book, George gave a great review in the thread sufficient to make me rethink..but haven't reached for the wallet just yet.

best,
dan

George S. Ledyard
03-08-2011, 12:10 AM
There was a previous thread discussing the book here
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19392&highlight=aikibojitsu

My thoughts then were the use of the technical terms were a little misleading to those familiar with them and might present a barrier. Thus at some point the analogy my cease to be helpful but if it helps some thats great.

of course i haven't read the book, George gave a great review in the thread sufficient to make me rethink..but haven't reached for the wallet just yet.

best,
dan

I have an entire library of totally mediocre, in some cases poor, aikido and martial arts books. When you occasionally find one that actually has some content, and even content that is extremely difficult to wrap your mind around, I think we should do our best to support the effort, rather like supporting local small businesses rather than the big chains or trying to buy local produce to support small farmers.

There's a tremendous amount in the is book that I have a hard time wrapping my mind around... isn't that fantastic? A book that represents a real stretch? In the same way folks had a hard time understanding the Founder, this book is HUGE in its conception and it takes work to digest. It is also one of those books that you will be able to read each year forever and see something new each time. That makes it quite the bargain as books go.

I do not think that reading this book will make your Aikido better. (Practicing the stick work described probably would.) It will enlarge your conception of what our art offers... it's really staggering. It is so NOT an ordinary technique book. You don't speed read this book. If anyone read Ushiro Sensei's latest book, there's a lot of content like that... a paragraph that you simply stop and think about for a couple of days; stuff you aren't sure you understand what the author meant. I love stuff like this... it isn't easy but it's definitely worth reading if you are thoughtful about the art at all. The folks who think that Aikido is pretty much about fighting, and worry most about whether their Aikido can defeat an MMA practitioner should stay away for sure.

graham christian
03-08-2011, 07:19 AM
I learned electronics and radio communications in the Air Force. I also have an associate degree in electrical/electronic engineering technology and have designed and built antennas though nothing in the microwave range.

From my viewpoint the body is a signal generator, the arms are the transmissions lines and the staff is the antenna. It seems that you are trying to tune the system ( generator, tx lines, antenna or body, arms, staff) to the same frequency.
I think that the explanation of microwave waveguides is confusing as the vibrations talked about are no where near the frequencies of microwaves. Plus the frequency of the staff is a mechanical vibration not an electrical-magnetic vibration.

I am still trying to figure out what "attenuated activation" is. What are you attenuating and what are you activating?

How does this help my Aikido?

Any help?

dps

David. From your viewpoint the staff is the antenna. From Sensei Reads viewpoint the staff is used 'as' a waveguide. So you would have to see it from that viewpoint to understand what he is saying.

He's not saying it IS a waveguide, he is saying it acts according to the principles of one.

I'm not saying treating it as an antenna is wrong as that may indeed lead to a different way of using it.

Anyway, therefore the energy put into it travels through it and as he says bounces off of it's walls as it travels and reflects back from the ends. So I suggest the 'vibrations' are more to do with feeling the movement of the energy in the staff.

The energy is put into it by the person holding it or using it. So I would think therefore that person is activating this movement of energy in the staff.

Now if you can therefore put a lot of energy into it causing this activation then surely you could reduce that as well no? Would that not be attenuated activation?

Especially if you think of holding the staff with someone pushing hard from one end. They would therefore be pushing a lot of energy into it.(activation) I'm sure with your experience you could adjust and move in such a way that either earths that force or disperses it and thus reduces it.

Now I may be completely wrong here, but that's my attempt at it.

If I add on all the other concepts he gives there to do with motion of the staff and then even to motion of the person with the staff it makes it all the more fascinating. Plus the fact that he is saying it is a matter of following Natural Laws which you need to understand, see, follow and apply. Interesting.

2cents. G.

Mark Kruger
03-08-2011, 01:42 PM
Does he define what preformal means? I am unable to locate a definition elsewhere.

Tenyu
03-08-2011, 02:01 PM
Does he define what preformal means? I am unable to locate a definition elsewhere.

Yes, everything's defined. Glossary included for easy reference.

danj
03-08-2011, 10:12 PM
I have an entire library of totally mediocre, in some cases poor, aikido and martial arts books. When you occasionally find one that actually has some content, and even content that is extremely difficult to wrap your mind around, I think we should do our best to support the effort, rather like supporting local small businesses rather than the big chains or trying to buy local produce to support small farmers.

There's a tremendous amount in the is book that I have a hard time wrapping my mind around... isn't that fantastic? A book that represents a real stretch? In the same way folks had a hard time understanding the Founder, this book is HUGE in its conception and it takes work to digest. It is also one of those books that you will be able to read each year forever and see something new each time. That makes it quite the bargain as books go.

I do not think that reading this book will make your Aikido better. (Practicing the stick work described probably would.) It will enlarge your conception of what our art offers... it's really staggering. It is so NOT an ordinary technique book. You don't speed read this book. If anyone read Ushiro Sensei's latest book, there's a lot of content like that... a paragraph that you simply stop and think about for a couple of days; stuff you aren't sure you understand what the author meant. I love stuff like this... it isn't easy but it's definitely worth reading if you are thoughtful about the art at all. The folks who think that Aikido is pretty much about fighting, and worry most about whether their Aikido can defeat an MMA practitioner should stay away for sure.

tapping out and reaching for wallet!

JW
03-08-2011, 11:57 PM
I have a question for all who bought or will buy this book. What makes you want to give it a chance? For instance, Ellis Amdur had a lot of articles on AJ, and posts on forums. He got people engaged. Big-name aikido shihans in major organizations get interest because people in aikido know or "believe in" them.
I know some people would have seen Read Sensei do a demo, and became interested that way. But otherwise, what is the reason?

I'm just curious about how a person who has something to say produces enough interest and gains enough credibility to sell their book.

Tenyu
03-09-2011, 07:13 AM
Jonathan,

Are you interested in learning the technical principles of Aikido?

Alex Megann
03-09-2011, 07:58 AM
As well as over thirty years in aikido, I am a trained physicist. For this reason, my teacher has asked me many times to explain what he is trying to get across in physical terms - he talks in terms of gravity, wave-like movements and so on, and I think he is hoping I will come up with some kind of "universal theory of aikido".

I have tried on at least two occasions to start writing articles describing aikido principles in terms of concepts like Newton's laws of motion, static stability and rotational forces, but each time I realised that that is actually not how I, personally, understand aikido. In other words, this way of looking at aikido doesn't help me to make progress. Others, of course, may have different ways of learning than I do.

In both my aikido training and my yoga practice right now, I am working on things like freeing the shoulder blades and linking them to my spine, and feeling connections between the soles of my feet and my hips. Of course physics explains these things perfectly well, but it doesn't help me to relax and to cultivate awareness in my body - if anything, engaging my logical, rational brain has the opposite effect!

From what I have read, I have a lot of respect for Tom Read and his teaching, and I wouldn't hesitate to go to one of his classes if he came to my neighbourhood. All the same, I am completely befuddled by the use of complex and subtle but extremely precise physics terms in this context. Maybe I have been made cynical by exposure to the whole industry of alternative quackery using "quantum" this and "holographic" that, but I am immediately cautious when I see relatively obscure physics terminology such as waveguides and asymptotes being used to describe movements of the human frame.

Have any other physicists read this book, and if so do they have any comments on it?

Alex

Graham Farquhar
03-09-2011, 08:10 AM
I have an entire library of totally mediocre, in some cases poor, aikido and martial arts books. When you occasionally find one that actually has some content, and even content that is extremely difficult to wrap your mind around, I think we should do our best to support the effort, rather like supporting local small businesses rather than the big chains or trying to buy local produce to support small farmers........

If anyone read Ushiro Sensei's latest book, there's a lot of content like that... a paragraph that you simply stop and think about for a couple of days; stuff you aren't sure you understand what the author meant. I love stuff like this... it isn't easy but it's definitely worth reading if you are thoughtful about the art at all. The folks who think that Aikido is pretty much about fighting, and worry most about whether their Aikido can defeat an MMA practitioner should stay away for sure.

George

Thanks for this. It would be great if you could share one or two titles of books which make you stop and think about things for a couple of days that would be great for those of us who want that stretch.

Graham

dps
03-09-2011, 10:45 AM
George

Thanks for this. It would be great if you could share one or two titles of books which make you stop and think about things for a couple of days that would be great for those of us who want that stretch.

Graham

George,

It would also be great if you could explain the terminology used.

I love stretching the old gray matter.

dps

sakumeikan
03-09-2011, 10:55 AM
As well as over thirty years in aikido, I am a trained physicist. For this reason, my teacher has asked me many times to explain what he is trying to get across in physical terms - he talks in terms of gravity, wave-like movements and so on, and I think he is hoping I will come up with some kind of "universal theory of aikido".

I have tried on at least two occasions to start writing articles describing aikido principles in terms of concepts like Newton's laws of motion, static stability and rotational forces, but each time I realised that that is actually not how I, personally, understand aikido. In other words, this way of looking at aikido doesn't help me to make progress. Others, of course, may have different ways of learning than I do.

In both my aikido training and my yoga practice right now, I am working on things like freeing the shoulder blades and linking them to my spine, and feeling connections between the soles of my feet and my hips. Of course physics explains these things perfectly well, but it doesn't help me to relax and to cultivate awareness in my body - if anything, engaging my logical, rational brain has the opposite effect!

From what I have read, I have a lot of respect for Tom Read and his teaching, and I wouldn't hesitate to go to one of his classes if he came to my neighbourhood. All the same, I am completely befuddled by the use of complex and subtle but extremely precise physics terms in this context. Maybe I have been made cynical by exposure to the whole industry of alternative quackery using "quantum" this and "holographic" that, but I am immediately cautious when I see relatively obscure physics terminology such as waveguides and asymptotes being used to describe movements of the human frame.

Have any other physicists read this book, and if so do they have any comments on it?

Alex
Alex,
Reading a book on Aikido such as the book in question might well give you complex theories. However I think too much emphasis is put on these type of books . Best bet is to just practice and if you use this experience and a bit of common sense I think you can acquire understanding of Aikido principles.On the one hand you have the Mystic Meg group/on the other the 'Science /Theoretical /Universal principle/Unified Theory groups, me? I say KISS.
Cheers, Joe.
Ps Meant to say hello at Cardiff.

Alex Megann
03-09-2011, 11:37 AM
Alex,
Reading a book on Aikido such as the book in question might well give you complex theories. However I think too much emphasis is put on these type of books . Best bet is to just practice and if you use this experience and a bit of common sense I think you can acquire understanding of Aikido principles.On the one hand you have the Mystic Meg group/on the other the 'Science /Theoretical /Universal principle/Unified Theory groups, me? I say KISS.
Cheers, Joe.
Ps Meant to say hello at Cardiff.

Hi Joe,

I'm sure there is some content in books like this - as I said, I'm sure Tom Read knows his stuff as far as aikido goes - but sometimes the words tend to put me off delving too far. There are only so many hours in the day, after all!

I think I remember us having quite a long chat in Cardiff, but then maybe my old brain is getting too tired these days...

Alex

Mark Kruger
03-09-2011, 12:22 PM
From what I have read, I have a lot of respect for Tom Read and his teaching, and I wouldn't hesitate to go to one of his classes if he came to my neighbourhood. All the same, I am completely befuddled by the use of complex and subtle but extremely precise physics terms in this context. Maybe I have been made cynical by exposure to the whole industry of alternative quackery using "quantum" this and "holographic" that, but I am immediately cautious when I see relatively obscure physics terminology such as waveguides and asymptotes being used to describe movements of the human frame.

Have any other physicists read this book, and if so do they have any comments on it?

Alex

Well, I'm working in structural and civil engineering, but my BS is in physics. I've also worked as an aircraft electrician for the Navy and at a university applied physics laboratory on underwater acoustics. I've been practicing aikido for close to 20 years. My wife has a PhD in physics and did her dissertation on quantum dots. She has been practicing aikido for over 15 years.

I just borrowed the book last night from my Sensei, so I can't give a full assessment. From what I have read, I concur with your post. For the layperson the terminology isn't a problem, but for knowledgeable folks it is the equivalent of fingernails on the chalkboard.

I'll post more once I have a chance read more of his book.

kewms
03-09-2011, 12:31 PM
In both my aikido training and my yoga practice right now, I am working on things like freeing the shoulder blades and linking them to my spine, and feeling connections between the soles of my feet and my hips. Of course physics explains these things perfectly well, but it doesn't help me to relax and to cultivate awareness in my body - if anything, engaging my logical, rational brain has the opposite effect!

I haven't yet read Read Sensei's book, but that's been my experience as well. (My background is in materials science and solid state physics.) The more "accurate" and "scientific" a description is, the less it helps me. Sometimes science-based metaphors can help -- like thinking of body structure as an electrical ground path -- but only as long as they remain metaphorical.

Katherine

Keith Larman
03-09-2011, 12:48 PM
Well, unlike Alex, I'm an amateur. But in my graduate/"professional student" days I spent a lot of time in physics and mathematics. Asymptotes are kind of an interesting topic, I suppose, but the thing here is that the application in this case seems odd. In mathematics I have a fairly good understanding although it seems Mr. Read is focusing on a sort of special case to describe something physical -- like skating just outside the range of something else. The problem for me is that asymptote has a very distinct meaning and asymptotes can intersect the line depending on the function (a wavy line that repeatedly crosses the line but the wave gets smaller and smaller as an example). But anyway, I guess the problem I have is one of instantiation. He's talking about an rather obscure mathematical concept as if it is a physical *thing* of sorts which itself carries all sorts of properties (Alex's point about applying it to the human frame for instance). That seems like one heck of a leap. But maybe it is possible/correct in physics in a way I don't know, but I'm kinda stuck in the mathematical definition. Then again I've been out of school for a quarter century...

Shrug. I can see hints of what he's getting at. But I also find the use of the terms, well, misleading. Then again it might by my limitations.

One issue I have long had is the misuse of highly technical words. Scientific/philosophical jargon tends to lend an air of authority and "accuracy" to writing. Unfortunately if the words are not being used in a sort of "canonical" fashion then we're left with at best confusion and misinterpretation.

That's all I got on this one... I'm sure he could be doing some great stuff. I'm just not so sure about the explanation...

Demetrio Cereijo
03-09-2011, 01:09 PM
I'm wondering what is Read Sensei background in maths/physics.

Flintstone
03-09-2011, 02:31 PM
I'm wondering what is Read Sensei background in maths/physics.
I may risk a guess.

Demetrio Cereijo
03-09-2011, 03:07 PM
At your own risk.

mathewjgano
03-09-2011, 03:10 PM
I'll have to read up more, but is it correct to say the use of asymptote is directly related to the effects of "limit" in calculus? Isn't it just describing limits with respect to geometry of motion (spirals, etc.)? One analogous movement being to keep aite at the very limits of stability in order to maintain control; maintaining some space along the continuum in which, theoretically, aite can approach but never touch?
That's how I've been applying the term...for what little I've been paying attention to it. I have no clear idea what it denotes and my calculus classes were a decade ago and bastardized by years of irrational poetry writing.

Keith Larman
03-09-2011, 05:25 PM
Wikipedia's page is actually quite good. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asymptote)

danj
03-10-2011, 05:10 AM
Have any other physicists read this book, and if so do they have any comments on it?

Alex

Radio physics was my game before getting into sports engineering. Agree its tough to use physics to explain aikido, probably something derivative like biomechanics is better suited?

Haven't read the book as yet but agree with Mark's 'fingernails on a chalk board thing'

From what I read in the sample, and looking past the jargon, I got a koan or two from it which is often gold if its what you need at the time.

Mark looking forward to your review...

Mark Freeman
03-10-2011, 05:34 AM
In both my aikido training and my yoga practice right now, I am working on things like freeing the shoulder blades and linking them to my spine, and feeling connections between the soles of my feet and my hips. Of course physics explains these things perfectly well, but it doesn't help me to relax and to cultivate awareness in my body - if anything, engaging my logical, rational brain has the opposite effect!



Hi Alex,

I agree, for me the progress I make in aikido is down to my own internal awarenes of what my mind and body are doing in the moment. There is no time for rational logical thought, it just gets in the way.

There is a place for the rational intellect though, when it comes to trying to explain to another what your understanding is, of what is happening. But the more complex the explanation, the less people there will be to understand you. And those that do understand, then only have an intellectual understanding and not the deep mind/body knowing that is required to actually 'do' something.

My understanding of quantum physics is sketchy at best, but I am not averse to using an aspect of it in my teaching. As far as I am aware- a wave is a particle is a wave, it is either or, depending on the moment it is 'looked' at. I try to explain that the aikido mind/body is like this, either solid or liquid depending on the moment of engagement, it works for me anyway:)

regards

Mark

mrlizard123
03-10-2011, 06:49 AM
From the excerpts available on the website it sounds to me like there might be some interesting concepts but wrapped in difficult terminology though I'll not comment their it's accuracy as I'd be stepping outside my pay-grade in terms of physics knowledge.

I can get some of what is meant (I think) from the discussion of asymptotes but that doesn't mean that I think the terminology itself is accurate or appropriate.

Being stood where uke is unable to reach you, moving in such a fashion as to always be "one step ahead" due to a limitation in their ability to move; this makes some sense but whether that is what is intended or not I can't be sure based on the use of complicated terms.

Whether these terms add or detract from the message I guess would be revealed if I read the whole book and compared "notes" with someone with a greater understanding of the terms used.

If someone wants to mail me a copy I'll happily read it :D

sakumeikan
03-10-2011, 07:05 AM
Jonathan,

Are you interested in learning the technical principles of Aikido?
If anyone is interested in learning Aikido principles why not simply practice?Is it necessary to sit and read articles of the type to understand in a practical sense something like Kote Gaeshi? Aikido is not rocket science . Imo these books are no more than coffee table ornaments. Cheers, Joe.

Mark Freeman
03-10-2011, 08:12 AM
If anyone is interested in learning Aikido principles why not simply practice?

Now don't go getting all reactionary on us Joe!

Surely it's better to endlessly discuss the text, the syntax, the punctuation and the typeface of the complicated words than to do something as daft as getting onto the mat and working it out there!:D

Keith Larman
03-10-2011, 09:07 AM
Since when is practicing and reading about something mutually exclusive? :) Okay, not happening at the exact same time, but I'm pretty sure most of you aren't on the mat for all your waking hours. I'm sure at least a few of you aren't on constant alert, practicing continuously and might actually do something like sit on the pot for a few minutes and read a book...

dps
03-10-2011, 02:23 PM
might actually do something like sit on the pot for a few minutes and read a book...

Any longer than a few minutes my legs go numb and the cushioned seat sticks to my backside.

dps

JW
03-10-2011, 08:52 PM
Jonathan,

Are you interested in learning the technical principles of Aikido?

From a friend who doesn't know much about aikido? No. From someone who I believe for one reason or another to have a very rich and illuminating understanding to share? Yes.
My question was more straightforward, because I don't know anything about Read sensei other than what opinions have been shared on this board.
The question rephrased: if there are 5 people with fancy words publishing books, and none of them are directly related (in terms of budo-lineage) to anyone I know, and I have not felt any of them.. what criteria might I use to choose which of the 5 authors is on the money? I have lots of fancy terms I made up. Should anyone trust me? Just because attenuated activation of asymptotes using level 25 resonators sounds fancy, should I buy your (hypothetical) book?

Tenyu
03-11-2011, 08:56 AM
From someone who I believe for one reason or another to have a very rich and illuminating understanding to share? Yes.
My question was more straightforward, because I don't know anything about Read sensei other than what opinions have been shared on this board.

Have you been to his website and read it? Have you read the excerpts he's made available online?


The question rephrased: if there are 5 people with fancy words publishing books, and none of them are directly related (in terms of budo-lineage) to anyone I know, and I have not felt any of them.. what criteria might I use to choose which of the 5 authors is on the money?

Are there four other books discussing the fundamental physical principles of Aikido? Have you not read any Aikido books other than what your teacher or your teacher's teacher have written? When I first started Aikido I saw Sunadomari's presentation in the Aikido Journal video. I liked it so I bought his book which I enjoyed. I don't know anyone from that lineage nor did I ever take ukemi from him. He passed away last year. Hypothetically, if O Sensei were unknown, and you saw a video of his work, would you ignore what he had to say because no one else you know knew of him?

Should anyone trust me?

If you don't back up your descriptions with any evidence, I wouldn't.

dps
03-12-2011, 05:39 AM
From;

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?p=276059#post276059

in terminology that I understand,

The theoretical foundation of aikido and its mastery is very simple and can be taught in precision much like music theory, practicing and achieving it is a different story of course. Nage cannot violate the implicit demand nor the harmonic resonant frequency of uke(or the staff if one wishes to practice O Sensei's aikibojitsu) as the universe is governed by natural law. So in technical terms nage is bound by uke's frequency, nage has no choice in the path, timing, and energy to respond with in order to find the truly unassailable position. The relationship between uke and nage is mapped out by the following graphs where nage is the sine wave(the initial point being 0 completely neutral) and uke is the cosine wave(the intial point being 1 manifesting attack).

http://img247.imageshack.us/img247/8678/ukenagegrapheu5.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
[/URL]

http://img165.imageshack.us/img165/6696/ukenagegraph2mz8.jpg (http://g.imageshack.us/g.php?h=247&i=ukenagegrapheu5.jpg)


If nage is absolutely non-resistant(yet grounded) then nage will always lead uke with a 90 degree phase shift in time, where uke has no potential for kaeshiwaza and nage has the option of presenting uke with a throw at 90, 270, 450, 630 degrees, and so on which can all be a terminal point in nage's expression of peak intensity during that particular cycle. Essentially uke has to deal with infinity then if nage chooses the exponential over linear path. In practice, uke doesn't have to worry too much about it because gravity will eventually bring uke down from the throw, however far that may be, and flying through the air is a much better alternative than having to run into nage's fist. My sensei tells me during his prime his staff would literally break in half from striking hyperbolically to nothing more than an asympototic plane in the air. Mastering aikido requires an understanding of the universe. Hikitsuchi Sensei said if your heart is not correct your technique cannot be correct, if you do not practice masakatsu agatsu then you will either consciously or unconsciously impose your personal desires hence resistance into the pre-determined preformal role of nage. Modern society teaches us freedom lies in having choices, while aikido teaches us freedom lies in understanding the universe already made the choices for us while giving us the ability to manifest them totally non-resistively and beautifully. It's no surprise the martial aspect is such a small subset of aikido, it's religion by definition.

Regards,
Tenyu "the aikido geek" Hamaki

When two waves meet you get a third resultant wave that is a different phase and amplitude of the original waves. The resultant wave is dependent on the phase and amplitude difference of the two original waves.

Using the following website could you point out the resultant wave form?

[url]http://paws.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/superposition/superposition.html (http://g.imageshack.us/g.php?h=165&i=ukenagegraph2mz8.jpg)

dps

dps
03-14-2011, 01:38 PM
So the two people who endorse this book are;




The most important book on Aikido ever written.




and

In the same way folks had a hard time understanding the Founder, this book is HUGE in its conception and it takes work to digest.

I do not think that reading this book will make your Aikido better.

dps

Tenyu
03-14-2011, 05:30 PM
From;

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?p=276059#post276059

in terminology that I understand,

When two waves meet you get a third resultant wave that is a different phase and amplitude of the original waves. The resultant wave is dependent on the phase and amplitude difference of the two original waves.

Using the following website could you point out the resultant wave form?

http://paws.kettering.edu/~drussell/Demos/superposition/superposition.html

dps

David,

None of those superpositions are optimal to Aikido because they all introduce resistance. The graph in the book represents only one waveform in real life application, not two. It's nage's job to initiate and lead, with respect to uke's inertial reactance, the same waveform uke's bound to from the very beginning. The sine and cosine in the book represent nage's relative power locations in time(90 deg, the fixed point of non-resistance) ahead of uke's along the exact same waveform.

I realize there's a lot of focus in non-Aikido internal arts to succeed through buckling and compromising uke's integrity, but these actions both in theory and practice create a fundamentally flawed separation(please read Ascent of Humanity in Open Topics) with multiple discordant waveforms between nage and uke. If it's not obvious chaos is the last thing nage wants in a martial interaction. If one's in danger, then nage will do whatever necessary including compromising uke's integrity, but that's easy for any beginner to learn and should rarely be the focus in the practice of Internal Aikido. The psychology and intent we train most of the time in the dojo is the same one we want to be applying in our daily lives.

We already have a global culture and infrastructure today, politically, economically, socially embracing this disrespect for uke's integrity, primal violence, desire to segregate the other through every means possible. People ‘succeed' by subjugating the other, might makes right, but no one's ever apart from their actions. We are what we do. A firm foundation and grounding in the Infinite cannot co-exist that way. The root source of all of humanity's problems can be traced back to normalizing disconnection with the Infinite.

Keith Larman
03-14-2011, 06:36 PM
... The root source of all of humanity's problems can be traced back to normalizing disconnection with the Infinite.

Hmmm, I would think that sometimes a trombone rejoices, but a stalactite around a somnambulist always accidentally gives secret financial aid to the midwife! Most people believe that some espadrille steals pencils from a saintly marzipan, but they need to remember how non-chalantly a cup meditates. Toscanini, the friend of the Interloper and Jespera, returns home with the hand about the haunch. When another labyrinth goes to sleep, a cleavage ruminates.

Obviously I'm getting a migraine...

danj
03-14-2011, 07:07 PM
One of the benefits of a western scientific approach, such as probably adopted by the book in question is a reductionist approach i.e. lets make things simplier so we can get our head around some ideas and learn something.

Having presented a sine/cosine analogy (its quite nice by the way) its important to recognise that
1. when discussing an analogy, recognise its limits, at some point all analogies cease to be useful. This is usually the point where they introduce more complexity....which would seem to be the case here
2. when discussing a concept its important to not wander onto other topics without dealing with the first one completely, this is especially important if it is the foundation for later ideas.

hopes this helps.. and keen to hear thoughts

best,
dan

David,

None of those superpositions are optimal to Aikido because they all introduce resistance. The graph in the book represents only one waveform in real life application, not two. It's nage's job to initiate and lead, with respect to uke's inertial reactance, the same waveform uke's bound to from the very beginning. The sine and cosine in the book represent nage's relative power locations in time(90 deg, the fixed point of non-resistance) ahead of uke's along the exact same waveform.

I realize there's a lot of focus in non-Aikido internal arts to succeed through buckling and compromising uke's integrity, but these actions both in theory and practice create a fundamentally flawed separation(please read Ascent of Humanity in Open Topics) with multiple discordant waveforms between nage and uke. If it's not obvious chaos is the last thing nage wants in a martial interaction. If one's in danger, then nage will do whatever necessary including compromising uke's integrity, but that's easy for any beginner to learn and should rarely be the focus in the practice of Internal Aikido. The psychology and intent we train most of the time in the dojo is the same one we want to be applying in our daily lives.

We already have a global culture and infrastructure today, politically, economically, socially embracing this disrespect for uke's integrity, primal violence, desire to segregate the other through every means possible. People ‘succeed' by subjugating the other, might makes right, but no one's ever apart from their actions. We are what we do. A firm foundation and grounding in the Infinite cannot co-exist that way. The root source of all of humanity's problems can be traced back to normalizing disconnection with the Infinite.

Tenyu
03-14-2011, 07:59 PM
1. when discussing an analogy, recognise its limits, at some point all analogies cease to be useful. This is usually the point where they introduce more complexity....which would seem to be the case here

dan

Dan,

The graph isn't an analogy, it directly represents the relationship of power between nage and uke. I think what the graph informs of Aikido is very simple. I wrote a little more clarification in post #291 in my long introductory thread. Please let me know what you find confusing about it.

sakumeikan
03-15-2011, 03:46 AM
Any longer than a few minutes my legs go numb and the cushioned seat sticks to my backside.

dps

David,
What are you doing sitting on my comfy toilet seat???? Joe

sakumeikan
03-15-2011, 04:01 AM
Now don't go getting all reactionary on us Joe!

Surely it's better to endlessly discuss the text, the syntax, the punctuation and the typeface of the complicated words than to do something as daft as getting onto the mat and working it out there!:D
Dear Mark,
i would suggest that sitting for hours clutching a dictionary, Physics /Maths books would be less tiring physically than doing a hard session at the dojo.Armchair Aikido is really good. My own reading is limited to the Dandy, the Beano , Batman and a well thumbed 1957 copy of Health and Efficiency.The last book is read avidly for purely educational purposes only!!
Cheers, Joe.

dps
03-15-2011, 07:41 AM
David,
What are you doing sitting on my comfy toilet seat???? Joe

Sometimes it is the only place I can go and have some quiet and read a book.

Mine's not heated is yours.

David

sakumeikan
03-15-2011, 05:46 PM
Hmmm, I would think that sometimes a trombone rejoices, but a stalactite around a somnambulist always accidentally gives secret financial aid to the midwife! Most people believe that some espadrille steals pencils from a saintly marzipan, but they need to remember how non-chalantly a cup meditates. Toscanini, the friend of the Interloper and Jespera, returns home with the hand about the haunch. When another labyrinth goes to sleep, a cleavage ruminates.

Obviously I'm getting a migraine...

Dear Keith,
Instead of you getting a migraine having read your comments I think your giving me a migraine. Just joking. Love your article. Great example of extracting the urine.
Joe.

Mark Kruger
03-16-2011, 05:27 PM
Given the graph, how can you throw somebody at 450 degrees or 630 degrees given that both uke and nage approach infinite contraction or de-contraction at 270 degrees?

Given the graph, where are the sine and cosine waves? Sine and cosine plots are smooth and continuous. Both lines that are plotted have a discontinuity at t=270.

Tenyu
03-16-2011, 06:29 PM
Mark,

The graph above is only an example specific to when nage finishes the technique with the second power application. Nage can finish with the first, second, third, or so on although I personally don't recommend having four or more in regular taijitsu practice. Here's the other graph, which isn't showing in the original post anymore for some reason, showing just the phase lead:

http://www.hollygroverecords.com/UkeNagegraph.jpg

sakumeikan
03-16-2011, 07:31 PM
Given the graph, how can you throw somebody at 450 degrees or 630 degrees given that both uke and nage approach infinite contraction or de-contraction at 270 degrees?

Given the graph, where are the sine and cosine waves? Sine and cosine plots are smooth and continuous. Both lines that are plotted have a discontinuity at t=270.

Dear Mark,
Physics etc was never my strong point but geometry states that 360degrees is a circle? Where does Tenyu get his 630 degrees from unless of course he does more than one [ in Aikido terms ] rotational movement?Having said that why would anyone want to rotate more than 360 degrees anyway?Ice skaters may do multiple rotational movements but these are just 360 degrees multiplied by the number of rotations they do.I have yet to see a compass/protractor that can draw /measure 630 degrees. Cheers, Joe.

Tenyu
03-16-2011, 08:06 PM
Dear Mark,
Physics etc was never my strong point but geometry states that 360degrees is a circle? Where does Tenyu get his 630 degrees from unless of course he does more than one [ in Aikido terms ] rotational movement?Having said that why would anyone want to rotate more than 360 degrees anyway?Ice skaters may do multiple rotational movements but these are just 360 degrees multiplied by the number of rotations they do.I have yet to see a compass/protractor that can draw /measure 630 degrees. Cheers, Joe.

Joe,

Here's animation that shows:

http://www.rkm.com.au/ANIMATIONS/animation-sine-wave.html

In the nage/uke graph, cosine and sine display the passage of time, it has nothing to do with the physical rotations of nage or uke.

kewms
03-17-2011, 01:38 AM
Dear Mark,
Physics etc was never my strong point but geometry states that 360degrees is a circle? Where does Tenyu get his 630 degrees from unless of course he does more than one [ in Aikido terms ] rotational movement?Having said that why would anyone want to rotate more than 360 degrees anyway?Ice skaters may do multiple rotational movements but these are just 360 degrees multiplied by the number of rotations they do.I have yet to see a compass/protractor that can draw /measure 630 degrees. Cheers, Joe.

Tenyu appears to be mapping the relative oscillations of uke and nage over time. His chart would make perfect sense if they were elementary particles, although in that case the chart really should be labeled with fractions of pi rather than degrees. It makes somewhat less sense in the macroscopic limit (human beings).

Katherine

sakumeikan
03-17-2011, 04:03 AM
Joe,

Here's animation that shows:

http://www.rkm.com.au/ANIMATIONS/animation-sine-wave.html

In the nage/uke graph, cosine and sine display the passage of time, it has nothing to do with the physical rotations of nage or uke.
Tenju,
With all due respect you have not stated where/how you arrive at the 630 degrees . Would you accept my 360 degree as valid? Cheers, Joe.

danj
03-17-2011, 06:02 AM
I note the following
"Tenyu Hamaki is using diagrams **the one used in this thread?** that I created as part of my Aikibojitsu art form. These are direct copies from my own hand, and Tenyu Hamaki is using them without my permission. In fact, he didn't even ask. Everything he is doing is fradulent.

- Tom Read, founder of Aikibojitsu"
from http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?p=276059#post276059

The above is a fairly serious accussation I would think.

As an aside it also may explain the difficulty in adequately explaining the illustration and if it is indeed the case as suggested above I imagine the original accompanying text or commentary would shed some light.

respectfully,
dan

dps
03-17-2011, 07:07 AM
If you can't explain it so that people who already know Aikido can understand you then how are you going to get a new student to understand you?

dps

Mark Kruger
03-17-2011, 12:10 PM
If you can't explain it so that people who already know Aikido can understand you then how are you going to get a new student to understand you?

dps

I suspect that new students are preformal. :freaky:

The sad part about all of this is that it's going to make it harder for Read Sensei.

Mark Kruger
03-17-2011, 12:30 PM
Dear Mark,
Physics etc was never my strong point but geometry states that 360degrees is a circle? Where does Tenyu get his 630 degrees from unless of course he does more than one [ in Aikido terms ] rotational movement?Having said that why would anyone want to rotate more than 360 degrees anyway?Ice skaters may do multiple rotational movements but these are just 360 degrees multiplied by the number of rotations they do.I have yet to see a compass/protractor that can draw /measure 630 degrees. Cheers, Joe.

To answer your questions to the best of my ability:

Yes, there are 360 degrees in a circle. A degree, in this case, is a measure of angle. Of course the graph is labeled "x = time". Now, given a known angular velocity, you can associate time and angle, but there is no indication that this has been done in the graph. I suspect that Read Sensei had a verbal discussion that went along with the graph.

630 degrees does imply more than one full rotation around the circle.

Tenyu
03-17-2011, 02:43 PM
the chart really should be labeled with fractions of pi rather than degrees. It makes somewhat less sense in the macroscopic limit (human beings).

Katherine

I can't visualize Pi/2 like I can 90 degrees. There's no benefit using a confusing unit of measurement when one that's universally understood is available.

Tenyu
03-17-2011, 02:53 PM
I note the following
"Tenyu Hamaki is using diagrams **the one used in this thread?** that I created as part of my Aikibojitsu art form. These are direct copies from my own hand, and Tenyu Hamaki is using them without my permission. In fact, he didn't even ask. Everything he is doing is fradulent.

- Tom Read, founder of Aikibojitsu"
from http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?p=276059#post276059

The above is a fairly serious accussation I would think.

As an aside it also may explain the difficulty in adequately explaining the illustration and if it is indeed the case as suggested above I imagine the original accompanying text or commentary would shed some light.

respectfully,
dan

This has all been covered:

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19361

post #291 in http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19361&page=12

post # 43 in http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19542&page=2

I can't explain what you don't understand if you don't tell me what it is you don't understand or if you don't read what I've already written about the graph.

Tenyu
03-17-2011, 02:57 PM
If you can't explain it so that people who already know Aikido can understand you then how are you going to get a new student to understand you?

dps

I already said in post # 329 on page http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19361&page=14 that technical theories are not given to a beginner. This is a forum of many teachers who could all benefit from reading and understanding the deeper concepts in Tom's book. I do think the book at times uses unnecessarily long descriptions, but considering there's never been a book before with this level of insight on the fundamental principles of Aikido, it's worth the effort to read once. I haven't read it in a couple years and I'll probably never read it again because I understood it the first time. The only thing I didn't get were a couple equations of higher math, but the concepts they describe were accessible.

mathewjgano
03-17-2011, 03:07 PM
I can't visualize Pi/2 like I can 90 degrees. There's no benefit using a confusing unit of measurement when one that's universally understood is available.

They're just different abstractions used to denote the same thing. Visualizing 90 degrees is visualizing Pi/2, so if you're doing one, you're already doing the other, but I agree it's generally better to use terms that feel most comfortable/familiar to us.
Also, I tend to think the use of confusing terminology has its place in the learning process. When you showed up here talking about asymptotes and the like, while it initially was gibberish to me (despite knowing a little about calculus), it provoked me to learn. Situational adaptation, whether it's the ability to switch between modes of communication or adapting to some "new" set of attacks, is what I consider to be the essence of "budo."

Ron Tisdale
03-17-2011, 04:28 PM
Actually, i don't see this addressed at all, Since Tom's post is the last one in that particular thread and all...

BUT I am late to the party, and as such, my impressions don't mean squat.

Best,
Ron (and I SUCK at math, so...)

This has all been covered:

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19361

post #291 in http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19361&page=12

post # 43 in http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19542&page=2

I can't explain what you don't understand if you don't tell me what it is you don't understand or if you don't read what I've already written about the graph.

Tenyu
03-17-2011, 05:14 PM
I can't believe I have to repost myself after giving proper links multiple times. No one can argue I haven't described in detail what those graphs mean. If any of the following descriptions are not understood, then a specific question must be asked.

If nage is absolutely non-resistant(yet grounded) then nage will always lead uke with a 90 degree phase shift in time, where uke has no potential for kaeshiwaza and nage has the option of presenting uke with a throw at 90, 270, 450, 630 degrees, and so on which can all be a terminal point in nage's expression of peak intensity during that particular cycle. Essentially uke has to deal with infinity then if nage chooses the exponential over linear path. Hikitsuchi Sensei said if your heart is not correct your technique cannot be correct, if you do not practice masakatsu agatsu then you will either consciously or unconsciously impose your personal desires hence resistance into the pre-determined preformal role of nage. Modern society teaches us freedom lies in having choices, while aikido teaches us freedom lies in understanding the universe already made the choices for us while giving us the ability to manifest them totally non-resistively and beautifully. It's no surprise the martial aspect is such a small subset of aikido, it's religion by definition.

The graph in the book represents only one waveform in real life application, not two. It's nage's job to initiate and lead, with respect to uke's inertial reactance, the same waveform uke's bound to from the very beginning. The sine and cosine in the book represent nage's relative power locations in time(90 deg, the fixed point of non-resistance) ahead of uke's along the exact same waveform.

I realize there's a lot of focus in non-Aikido internal arts to succeed through buckling and compromising uke's integrity, but these actions both in theory and practice create a fundamentally flawed separation(please read Ascent of Humanity in Open Topics) with multiple discordant waveforms between nage and uke. If it's not obvious chaos is the last thing nage wants in a martial interaction. If one's in danger, then nage will do whatever necessary including compromising uke's integrity, but that's easy for any beginner to learn and should rarely be the focus in the practice of Internal Aikido. The psychology and intent we train most of the time in the dojo is the same one we want to be applying in our daily lives.

We already have a global culture and infrastructure today, politically, economically, socially embracing this disrespect for uke's integrity, primal violence, desire to segregate the other through every means possible. People ‘succeed' by subjugating the other, might makes right, but no one's ever apart from their actions. We are what we do. A firm foundation and grounding in the Infinite cannot co-exist that way. The root source of all of humanity's problems can be traced back to normalizing disconnection with the Infinite.

When you hit a bag you're striking with your hand at uke. With the staff, I'm striking with uke at a grounded asymptote in space. In Aikido, I never strike at uke. Any atemi*(a physically unconnected throw) I throw are never aimed at uke in the particular but at upstream asymptotes surrounding uke that absolutely determine all of uke's options. For this to happen all of nage's atemi and power applications must be ahead of uke's power applications by 90 degrees, the location of total non-resistance, in time. You can see this mapped out in the graphs on this page: http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=14719 The Y-axis represents the power applications of both nage and uke. 1 and -1 are exactly the same, they both represent peak applied power(contraction) and 0 represents a return to peak potential power(decontraction). I copied these graphs from memory after one of the first classes I attended of Tom's where he drew this on the chalkboard. It's also in his new book Aikido Aikibojitsu and The Structure of Natural Law.

This is why fighting and blocking are impossible in Aikido. Referring to the same graph linked above, fighting requires nage's and uke's lines to intersect at 0, and for their peak power applications to collide together at the same time, the definition of absolute resistance.

*Atemi can be used as a transitional resonator(non-activation) leading up to the throw/strike or it can be used as a complete throw/strike(activation) in itself. The asymptotic placement in space is different depending on the type of atemi.

Flintstone
03-18-2011, 05:30 AM
I can't visualize Pi/2 like I can 90 degrees. There's no benefit using a confusing unit of measurement when one that's universally understood is available.
Well, were you an engineer you will find pi/2 far more visualizable than 90º...

Marc Abrams
03-18-2011, 07:17 AM
The owner of the written material (Reid Sensei) has clearly stated that it is being used without his direct permission. NOBODY should be responding to Tenyu, who is using somebody else's work without their explicit permission.

Marc Abrams

Flintstone
03-18-2011, 10:49 AM
The owner of the written material (Reid Sensei) has clearly stated that it is being used without his direct permission. NOBODY should be responding to Tenyu, who is using somebody else's work without their explicit permission.
Well, with all due respect for Reid Sensei, I don't see the connection between using somebody else's work w/o their explicit permission and responding to some(other)body else.

dps
03-18-2011, 10:52 AM
If you give a person enough rope he will hang himself, over and over and over again.

Tenyu's inability to use scientific concepts coherently smacks of pseudoscience.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudoscience,

"Pseudoscience is a claim, belief, or practice which is presented as scientific, but which does not adhere to a valid scientific methodology, lacks supporting evidence or plausibility, cannot be reliably tested, or otherwise lacks scientific status.[1] Pseudoscience is often characterized by the use of vague, exaggerated or unprovable claims, an over-reliance on confirmation rather than rigorous attempts at refutation, a lack of openness to evaluation by other experts, and a general absence of systematic processes to rationally develop theories."

Or simply put, If you can't dazzle them with your brilliance then baffle them with your bullshit.

dps

Tenyu
03-18-2011, 02:36 PM
The owner of the written material (Reid Sensei) has clearly stated that it is being used without his direct permission. NOBODY should be responding to Tenyu, who is using somebody else's work without their explicit permission.

Marc Abrams

Are you implying I’m copying and pasting from the book here? I’ve never duplicated any passages on this forum or elsewhere. The only thing I’ve used are the two graphs, which were originally posted three years ago before I even knew there was a book. Regardless they fall under fair use copyright laws.

No one else here but George has promoted the book, which was published three months ago. I suggest you buy it yourself if you haven’t already, you would learn a lot from it.

George S. Ledyard
04-22-2011, 04:37 PM
It has come to my attention that I may have been murky and less than precise in some of what I meant to say on this thread.

At one point I said something to the effect that reading this book wouldn't improve your Aikido. Taken out of context it doesn't sound like what I intended to say so i will restate my idea.

No book alone will improve improve anyone's practice. Just as few ouwld maintain that reading every book written on Zen will substitute for actual practice of meditation, no book on aikido, no matter how profound, will make your Aikido better without the effort to reflect the ideas and concepts outlined in the book in ones physical practice.

I think some took my statement to mean that I adhere to the belief that such a book as Tom Read's is merely an intellectual exercise. I do not believe that. Those who know me have heard me state on many occasions that I think that in order to have great Aikido, one needs to be thoughtful about ones practice. Personally, I think Aikido is an art designed for thoughtful people. I have never seen anyone who's Aikido is very good at all who is anti-intellectual about what he is doing. I think that the "just practice and you'll eventually get it" folks are not only wrong but 40 years of Aikido history would prove my point.

Tom Read's book on Aikibojitsu is complex. Our art is complex. The book takes work. Our art certainly takes work. But I want to be clear... thoughtful people, in my opinion, do better Aikido and this book offers an almost unlimited set of ideas and insights to help one think about the art. If one takes these ideas into ones practice so that they are reflected in what one is actually doing on the mat in the dojo, then the book will certainly help to make ones Aikido better.

The book is absolutely worth reading. It is a masterpiece of insights that came directly from a man's lifetime of Aikido practice. I hope this goes some way towards clearing up any misconceptions I may have created.

danj
04-23-2011, 08:18 PM
Largely based on discussions on the Aikiweb and George's thoughts I took a punt and bought the book in question, the author was happy to ship down under which was a great help too. Ponying up the $$$ I had to realise that while I'll happily pay hundreds to go to a seminar, why was I balking at the price of a book? Strange really because a book (anyones book) is something they have put a lot into and spent time distilling and organising their thoughts.
Well I am only a little way through this book and its tough going (even though I am literate in the sciences used in the book) here are a few thoughts so far.

1/ Gifted people usually use a structure/pedagogy to express themselves, often its easy to mistake the structure for the gifts or vice versa - particularly in the pseudo sciences and eastern schools (which i'll not name examples of because its a distraction and a red herring). Whats unusual here is western science is the structure and vehicle but the book is not scientific per se. Having got my head around that its easer to get on and read the book.

2/ Its a really heavy read, probably if your conversant with the science its off putting and if your not conversant with the science its a barrier to entry.

3/ Its seems to me to be autobiographical and an authentic representation of the author and his life's work, what a treasure to have someone lay it out for others to read.

4/ Mid way through the book I have a few things I can set to work on, one of which has had an immediate effect on my aiki. Not many seminars have had that effect.

planing to write up a full review when i finish, that might be sometime down the track though judging on my progress

dan

PS and OT George, am enjoying your video on connection too. Somethings are familiar some less and new stuff too, some things heard before in other ways some not. Seems a bit like a DR, IS, systema, aiki with a few other juicy bits rolled in as well and very helpful as an affirmation, learning tool and challenge to get better...thankyou

George S. Ledyard
04-24-2011, 12:38 PM
Largely based on discussions on the Aikiweb and George's thoughts I took a punt and bought the book in question, the author was happy to ship down under which was a great help too. Ponying up the $$$ I had to realise that while I'll happily pay hundreds to go to a seminar, why was I balking at the price of a book? Strange really because a book (anyones book) is something they have put a lot into and spent time distilling and organising their thoughts.
Well I am only a little way through this book and its tough going (even though I am literate in the sciences used in the book) here are a few thoughts so far.

1/ Gifted people usually use a structure/pedagogy to express themselves, often its easy to mistake the structure for the gifts or vice versa - particularly in the pseudo sciences and eastern schools (which i'll not name examples of because its a distraction and a red herring). Whats unusual here is western science is the structure and vehicle but the book is not scientific per se. Having got my head around that its easer to get on and read the book.

2/ Its a really heavy read, probably if your conversant with the science its off putting and if your not conversant with the science its a barrier to entry.

3/ Its seems to me to be autobiographical and an authentic representation of the author and his life's work, what a treasure to have someone lay it out for others to read.

4/ Mid way through the book I have a few things I can set to work on, one of which has had an immediate effect on my aiki. Not many seminars have had that effect.

planing to write up a full review when i finish, that might be sometime down the track though judging on my progress

dan

PS and OT George, am enjoying your video on connection too. Somethings are familiar some less and new stuff too, some things heard before in other ways some not. Seems a bit like a DR, IS, systema, aiki with a few other juicy bits rolled in as well and very helpful as an affirmation, learning tool and challenge to get better...thankyou

I am glad you are finding the DVD set useful. There's a lot in there. Most of the time when you work with Ikeda Sensei or Saotome Sensei and they want to focus on "aiki" work, they do so in the context of connection exercises. Often, folks might have some moderate success doing what they are doing, but then have problems translating the principles back into their kihon waza. I've been trying to develop an organized presentation of the principles so that folks can go through the whole repertoire of what they already know and apply the principles to take things up a level or two.