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Shinmai
12-29-2010, 09:01 PM
I've been researching woods to make my first jo, and the more research I do the more confused I become. So many recommendations!

Many of the woods I've seen highly recommended just aren't available to me here in Australia. When it comes to hardwood dowel, the hardware/timber places around here all have Kwila/Mervan and Tasmanian Oak and that's about it.

Never seen Kwila/Mervan recommended by anyone, but I've seen recommendations for Tasmanian Oak by a couple of aikidoka in various forums.

So I've decided to ignore all the exotic stuff and take a gamble on the Tassie Oak. I'm planning to make a couple: 1x25mm and 1x30mm. I'm a big strong lad and I don't know which will suit me best, so making two isn't a big effort.

But being wood-ignorant, I have a question about finishing...

Stain, varnish or some sort of oil? Or some combination? Or something else entirely?

Obviously the Jo needs to slide easily but not be slippery.

Anyone out there expert in this sort of thing?

Thanks in advance for any advice.

jbblack
12-30-2010, 09:00 AM
Brad at Kingfisher Woodworks has some thoughts: http://kingfisherwoodworks.com/warr.maint.html
I have used his oil finish on weapons for about 15 years and they work well.
Cheers, Jeff

lbb
12-30-2010, 09:39 AM
Stain, varnish or some sort of oil? Or some combination? Or something else entirely?

Sweat.

shakou
12-30-2010, 11:01 AM
Wood will always need to be treated with something. Varnish has a tendencey to not allow the wood to breath as it needs to. I have a friend who trains in Jodo and has stripped the varnish from his as it allows better movement of the weapon through his hands.

I prefer oiled over varnished also since making the switch to Sei Do Kai bokuto over standard cheaper shiro kashi bokuto, not as slippery in the hand. I suppose if you're making two then oil one and varnish the other, they can both be re done depending on your own preference.

I think the oil weapons makers use is tung oil, I may be wrong but can't check as the work system is a drag and has barred me from most weapons site :D

Larry Feldman
12-30-2010, 03:55 PM
Tung oil.

Shinmai
12-30-2010, 04:36 PM
Thanks guys.

Looks like Tung oil is the go. I've done a search for the Kingfisher oil but can't find anyone selling it here in Australia.

shakou
12-31-2010, 11:01 AM
look up bokken making on you tube and there is a guy called rei - ho i think who has a few good tutorials to watch, he pretty much explains it all on there, you can pick the oil up from most wood working store/dept etc.

ravenest
01-04-2011, 08:34 PM
I've been researching woods to make my first jo, and the more research I do the more confused I become. So many recommendations!

Many of the woods I've seen highly recommended just aren't available to me here in Australia. When it comes to hardwood dowel, the hardware/timber places around here all have Kwila/Mervan and Tasmanian Oak and that's about it.

Never seen Kwila/Mervan recommended by anyone, but I've seen recommendations for Tasmanian Oak by a couple of aikidoka in various forums.

So I've decided to ignore all the exotic stuff and take a gamble on the Tassie Oak. I'm planning to make a couple: 1x25mm and 1x30mm. I'm a big strong lad and I don't know which will suit me best, so making two isn't a big effort.

But being wood-ignorant, I have a question about finishing...

Stain, varnish or some sort of oil? Or some combination? Or something else entirely?

Obviously the Jo needs to slide easily but not be slippery.

Anyone out there expert in this sort of thing?

Thanks in advance for any advice.

Hi Cedric. I have been using Tassie oak for years for Jo and Bo. I've found it very sufficient (not good for bragging or posing though ;) ) Nice range of cheap ones and thicknesses at Bunnings, select the right piece, look for a straight grain and check for flaws or knots that will split across the length and not down it. Give it a good sand and rub in pure wood oil, (no additives) like Sifa furniture oil (hardware or Bunnings), If it dries out (of oil) it will start to split, even without use. Do maintenance (which we should all do anyway) after a heavy contact session, go over it, sand it and oil again. This gives me a good grip and movement through the hand. Eventuall it may not last as long as other expensive woods, then you will be up for another $12 at Bunnings, if you can handle that :D . Last teacher told me Sensai Sugarno used p-nut oil. I tried it and it seems just as good and cheaper. Dont varnish it for the reasons above. Have fun!

I do not reccomend linseed oil.