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RonRagusa
08-28-2010, 10:40 PM
Below is a brief interchange I had with Dan and some further comments from me.

I said...

I'd rather have uke
push the air
where I have been
than push me.

Dan said...

While that is excellent and sounds rather nice, by the way.

In a more poetic refrain:
He pushes the air
Where I have been

There is another way, Ron. he can push on you, and you use his enery to take it from him while simultaniously feeding back. He feels like he is pushing into a hole while you are cpatruing his being and leading him.

In my way of moving:
He pushes
I take from him what he offers
I give it back to him equally
We meet..in peace.

Peace
Dan

I said...

Hi Dan -

And so, together, we complete the circle.

All the best,
Ron

Dan said...
Well I like my version of
"He pushes the air
Were I have been.."

I love your version that fits my own

"Together we complete the circle..."

I'm stealing that (with credit).
Short and to the point.

Thanks
Dan

What I see is that Dan and I are talking about the same process albiet from diametrically opposed viewpoints. I am taking what uke has to offer while in a state of motion. My movement suggests a trajectory that uke may move in without encountering any resistance from me. Dan seems to be accepting uke's gift of energy statically and then leading uke in some way without much motion at all (I may have totally misinterpreted Dan's remarks here so please forgive).

Dan's statement: "he can push on you, and you use his enery to take it from him while simultaniously feeding back. He feels like he is pushing into a hole while you are cpatruing his being and leading him." is what I refer to as simultaneous leading and following or moving in concert, not conflict. When I yield my position to uke I do it in such a way as to afford him the opportunity to fall into the momentary vacuum I leave behind. The energy he has expended must go somewhere so I accept it with thanks, and give it back to him when we meet up later. His balance I keep; it will be restored when he meets the mat. I refer to this as the cycle of conflict engagement, neutralization and resolution.

It's rather like a surfer who rides the wave front, remaining calm and upright while the sea froths and churns around him. He accepts the force the ocean gives him, following where it leads, while leading it, as it in turn carries him along.

(Original blog post may be found here (http://ron-aikidothoughts.blogspot.com/2010/08/one-hundred-and-sixty-nine.html).)