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JohnH
04-28-2002, 11:27 PM
I was wondering how many of you cross-trained in other arts. I have spent a little time in American Karate and what we called Korean Tae Kwon Do. It was really a combined martial art with its base in TKD. It also included elements of Spetsnaz (a Russian art, I think), Jujutsu, and Aikido. Having not studied any of these other arts I could not tell if my instructor was being true to these systems or not. I could not have cared less either, I had a good time and it was what I was looking for at the time, very technique and practicality driven.
That experience got me interested in Aikido. Now that I have studied Aikido for a little while, I think my teacher either had very little experience in Aikido or practiced a very different style than what I have since been exposed to. But thatís neither here nor there.

My point is that I found Aikido through another art. Does anyone else have a similar story? Or a completely different story that involves cross-training?
Also, Does anyone here cross-train in Aikido and Capoeira? Capoeira looks like loads of fun and a great work out. I would especially love to hear a response from any Aikidoka/Capoeirista. :D

Thanks
John

Johan Tibell
04-29-2002, 05:12 AM
I have a background in Judo/Jiu-jitsu which I did for about three years. They didn't affect me much in my decision to choose Aikido though.

Regards,

Johan Tibell

andrew
04-29-2002, 05:34 AM
Originally posted by JohnH
of Spetsnaz (a Russian art, I think),

As I kind of half knew somehow (James Bond movies?) it's a Russian secret service thing.

Perhaps you did this thing at www.russianmartialart.com ? Which might well be what the Spetsnaz were taught...
andrew

Greg Jennings
04-29-2002, 07:17 AM
Originally posted by andrew
As I kind of half knew somehow (James Bond movies?) it's a Russian secret service thing.


Definitely not like our Secret Service which is a law enforemcent agency. It's actually part of the Treasury Service.

Spetznaz essentially means "Special Purpose". It's akin to our "Special Forces".

See:

http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/aureview/1986/nov-dec/boyd.html

ObAikido:
I don't know anyone that does Capoeira, much less that actively trains in both Capoeira and Aikido.

My general thought on cross training is that two conditions should be met before actively cross training. 1. The person should be very well grounded (like 5-10 years) in one art before pursuing another and 2. Have a considerable amount of free time.

Dabbling as opposed to actively cross training is, in my mind, a whole different topic.

Best Regards,

akiy
04-29-2002, 08:52 AM
Originally posted by Greg Jennings
ObAikido:
I don't know anyone that does Capoeira, much less that actively trains in both Capoeira and Aikido.
One of my previous aikido teachers used to train in Capoeira for about five years. She said she stopped when capoeira became less about "playing."

Interesting was that her mestre said that the most aggressive students that he had were those from aikido. My teacher thought this might have had to do with our ingraining the principle of irimi into our bodies...

-- Jun

andrew
04-29-2002, 08:58 AM
Originally posted by Greg Jennings


Definitely not like our Secret Service which is a law enforemcent agency.

I know nothing of your secret service!

And pretty much nobody knows the name of the Irish one. (Yes, it does exist.)

andrew

Krzysiek
04-29-2002, 09:20 AM
She said she stopped when capoeira became less about "playing."


What does Capoeira become if it becomes less about "playing"? (That's kind of like asking what does Aikido become when it becomes less about harmony... but I'm curious.

akiy
04-29-2002, 09:30 AM
Originally posted by Krzysiek
What does Capoeira become if it becomes less about "playing"?
Most likely competition for the sake of winning...

-- Jun

Greg Jennings
04-29-2002, 10:57 AM
Originally posted by andrew


I know nothing of your secret service!

And pretty much nobody knows the name of the Irish one. (Yes, it does exist.)


My point was that the term "Spetsnaz" is a term for the former Soviet/Russian "Special Forces".

It's not an art. It's not secret in any way. It's an overt military sub-organization.

Best Regards,

Doug Mathieu
04-29-2002, 12:49 PM
Hi John

I was training in a Jujitsu style called Willow Jujitsu when our teacher moved away and the class folded. Luckily a couple students knew of an Aikido Dojo and we went there.

Up to then the only thing I had seen on Aikido was a Bruce Tegner book where he said something along the lines of ...it's a nice looking art, difficult to learn and utterly impractical...

I found Aikido had similar feelings to the Jujitsu style I was learning in its aspect of not clashing and blending, going with the flow.

Since then I have noticed there appears to be many Aikido people who have trained in a prior martial art. Their stories often follow a pattern of coming to a time when they look for more than sparring and competition and a deeper thought process in a martial art.

I do realize other martial arts can provide deeper experiences eventually but it seems Aikido offers this from the start.

As to Capoeria I know an Aikido student at another Dojo who is training in both and enjoying it very much. The student is a young lady who teaches dance. She enjoys the movement in both Aikido and Capoeria.

JohnH
04-29-2002, 03:08 PM
I suppose the spetsnaz that I was taught must have been based on the techniques used by that organization. Thats just a guess though, I really don't know for sure.

My coming to Aikido was very similar to what Doug described. I had been researching Aikido on the web for a while. I found that this site and Aikido FAQ are really informative. I found a club through a local community college and started to practice with them while continuing my "TKD" training. (The " " are not meant to show any disdain for my previous art, but I don't think that it really qualifies as TKD even though that is what we called it.) During this time my "TKD" instructor was trying to develop my "Killer Instinct" evileyes(his words, not mine) while the Aikido dojo appealed to my less aggressive and destructive side. I came to realize through a sparring accident that I really didn't like the thought of becoming the Whirlwind of Total Annihilation :grr: that I believe my "TKD" instructor could have made me. I left for non junior college soon after and decided to continue pursuing Aikido instead of trying to find something like my "TKD" class.
Initially, I really missed having my physical limits pushed, but I have come to realize that Aikido can be physically, as well as mentally, demanding. I still miss kicking stuff, because I couldn't take my striking dummy to the dorm. But now that summer is here, the feet will fly!:D

I aggreed with Mr. Jennings when he said that Cross-Training takes a lot of free time. I also think that it can take a lot of money unless you are able to find someone who is willing to teach you for free. Considerng the comment in Mr. Jennings' first post I don't suppose I ever really cross-trained, dabbling seems to be more accurate. I just dabbled in Aikido untill I moved and dropped "TKD". I don't think I will do anything beyond dabbling untill I feel solid in Aikido. That sould only take a few decades:D. I'm trying to find a Capoeira group in my area that is cheap and close, so that I can pursue some of that dabbling.

cdwright
04-29-2002, 07:13 PM
Originally posted by JohnH
I was wondering how many of you cross-trained in other arts. I have spent a little time in American Karate and what we called Korean Tae Kwon Do. It was really a combined martial art with its base in TKD. It also included elements of Spetsnaz (a Russian art, I think), Jujutsu, and Aikido. Having not studied any of these other arts I could not tell if my instructor was being true to these systems or not. I could not have cared less either, I had a good time and it was what I was looking for at the time, very technique and practicality driven.
That experience got me interested in Aikido. Now that I have studied Aikido for a little while, I think my teacher either had very little experience in Aikido or practiced a very different style than what I have since been exposed to. But thatís neither here nor there.

My point is that I found Aikido through another art. Does anyone else have a similar story? Or a completely different story that involves cross-training?
Also, Does anyone here cross-train in Aikido and Capoeira? Capoeira looks like loads of fun and a great work out. I would especially love to hear a response from any Aikidoka/Capoeirista. :D

Thanks
John



Crosstraining is a great idea. Bruce Lee believed heavily in it. How do you defend against a kick unless you know how one is thrown? To quote Van Damme in Bloodsport(I KNOW it is cheesy but true) "Use any technique that works, never limit yourself to one style, to keep an open mind"

My "style" is not the same as your "style", it works for me. My sensei's sensei said to him during a test: "Alright, you've shown me what I have taught you. Now, show me something that is yours."