PDA

View Full Version : Aiki-Geometry


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


JohnH
04-27-2002, 01:08 AM
Howdy all

Could anyone tell me the signifigance of the three shapes,:circle: :square: :triangle: ? I started Aikido a little less than a year ago, and I think it may have been explained to me early on, but I seem to have forgotten.

Thanks:)

shihonage
04-27-2002, 01:53 AM
Originally posted by JohnH
Howdy all

Could anyone tell me the signifigance of the three shapes,:circle: :square: :triangle: ? I started Aikido a little less than a year ago, and I think it may have been explained to me early on, but I seem to have forgotten.

Thanks:)

It's simple: these are the shapes of the uke's motion after being thrown.

Oh wait...

particleman151
04-27-2002, 08:56 AM
I have read this in one of my aikido books but cant seem to find it right now.

If i can remeber correctly the triangle is the channeling of ki. The circle represents the circular movments of aikido and the square referses to the hara and having balance.

Hope this helps, if i can find my book ill repost with what it says in there.:ki:

guest1234
04-27-2002, 10:38 AM
In The Essence of Aikido, Spiritual Teaching of Morihei Ueshiba , complied by John Stevens, the circle, square and triangle are used to represent the three fundamentals.

The triangle represents iku-musubi (the vivifying fundamental) ,the ki-flow dimension , symbolizes initiative, and is the key to entering.

The circle represents taru-musubi (the completing fundamental), the liquid dimension, symbolizes unification, and is the key to blending.

The square represents tamatsume-musubi (fullfilling fundamental), the solid dimension, symbolizes form, and is the key to control.

b

Erik
04-27-2002, 12:49 PM
Originally posted by JohnH
Could anyone tell me the signifigance of the three shapes,:circle: :square: :triangle: ? I started Aikido a little less than a year ago, and I think it may have been explained to me early on, but I seem to have forgotten.


This may not be what you are looking for but hunt down some of Terry Dobsen's work. Primarily giving in to get your way. Terry broke them down into a way of representing conflict. For instance a triangle is forward energy. A square is solid and stable and a circle represents blending. Two triangles moving head on prepresented force on force whereas a triangle coming at a circle would cause the circle to turn and blend with the forward energy.

That's not a terribly good or detailed explanation but it convey's the direction Terry took with it.

Bruce Baker
04-27-2002, 04:37 PM
You will find numerous references to meanings in these shapes, as well as movement.

As you continue to practice Aikido you will mimic the movements of these shapes with your techniques and weapons training.

Since they are the most basic of building blocks, you will find a variety of applied meanings depending upon the type of martial art you are studying, and the teacher.

I think reading John Stevens books will explain the Japanese Aiki point of view, and your practice will find movements in these shapes ...

After that, put the hat on the man with the square body ... Aikido man from shapes!

Or did you want the Masonic Temple view from a building point?

NO ... really, poke about and see the different interpretations in different martial arts, then see how they all connect with these shapes as movement and philosophy.

Then just practice and see how much is true for you.

Suru
04-28-2002, 12:26 AM
The square represents shihonage, the four directions throw. It reminds us to "throw" our gratitude toward nature, ancestors, the universe, and other people.

The circle has no beginning and no ending. It represents the all-encapsulating nature of aikido technique.

The triangle points upward toward heaven and is stable at its earthen base. It represents tenchi nage, the ever-so-essential heaven and earth throw.


Drew

Brian Crowley
04-28-2002, 12:58 PM
I like the story that Terry Dobson tells on this subject in "It's a Lot Like Dancing...An Aikido Journey". After six years of training with Osensei, Dobson decides to ask him this very question during a momement when he finds himself alone with Osensei. Terry indicates that he thinks to himself,"one question in six years ain't so bad", so he politely asks about the meaning of circle, square, triangle.

Osensei responds with, "Terrusan, you know you should go find out yourself." Then Osensei walked away.

In the book, Terry indicates some irritation with Osensei's response; however I think his response was 100x more useful than if he had given a mini-lecture on the subject. These symbols are so basic and fundamental that they can really be used to represent hundreds of different principals, concepts, ways of moving, thinking, etc. Therefore I think that the true value lies in the thinking and learning process that you go through to attach meaning (if any) to them.

Brian

George S. Ledyard
04-29-2002, 09:12 AM
Originally posted by JohnH
Howdy all

Could anyone tell me the signifigance of the three shapes,:circle: :square: :triangle: ? I started Aikido a little less than a year ago, and I think it may have been explained to me early on, but I seem to have forgotten.

Thanks:)

John Stevens touches on this in various books. But the most extensive explanation of these symbols and the rest of the philosphical / spiritual underpinnings of O-Sensei's Aikido is in The Spiritual Foundations of Aikido by William Gleason Sensei.

Don_Modesto
04-29-2002, 10:50 AM
Originally posted by George S. Ledyard
The Spiritual Foundations of Aikido by William Gleason Sensei.

Been there, annotated that. In the words of Byron:

"In explaining metaphysics to the nation,
I wish he would explain his explanation!"

Failing the input of the venerable Gleason, I, for one, would sure benefit from your interepretation on this, George.

guest1234
04-29-2002, 05:02 PM
Originally posted by George S. Ledyard


John Stevens touches on this in various books. But the most extensive explanation of these symbols and the rest of the philosphical / spiritual underpinnings of O-Sensei's Aikido is in The Spiritual Foundations of Aikido by William Gleason Sensei.

I like Gleason Sensei's book, especially when I feel like I might be getting a handle on things, it's good for reminding me I don't:freaky: , but I found Stevens Sensei's book a bit more of a direct answer to the question, and more accessible to my beginner's mind:confused:

Also, I've bought twocopies of Gleason Sensei's book now, and each has split along the spine and the pages come loose...:eek: did yours do this?