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Tom123
02-10-2010, 07:42 PM
I'm wondering how much other Brit folks pay for insurance, federation membership etc. I've been advised to join the British Tomiki Aikido Federation, but it's 20 annual membership fee and 40 pounds insurance. 60 a year for a humble 5th kue who is unlikely to enter a competition for a while seems a Hell of a lot of money. The Mrs is likely to do some complaining! Id be really grateful for any comments and advice concerning this. Thank you. Martin

PS When I did karate (admittedly about 20 year ago) it was all in for a tenner.

Abasan
02-10-2010, 07:55 PM
Slightly more than 10 years ago, I paid a measly 3quid for the yearly insurance for my University aikido club. I think they did it together with BAB. Maybe the cost of insurance has gone up?

Tom123
02-10-2010, 08:15 PM
Thanks for that, Ahmad. Apparently the federation in question will 'shell out' if need be, whereas the considerably cheaper AMA (Amateur Martial Association) will only cough up if you've been off work for 6 months and have a 'life long' injury. It still seems a lot of money, though.

chris wright
02-11-2010, 02:42 AM
Hi Martin, the cost depends on the club and association.
Many package the insurance and membership together, some charge separately.
I suppose it also depends on if the club is part of a 'national' association - so the fee would be dictated by their head office.
This fee will often go towards courses so members pay less to train with Japanes Shihan, who they pay to come over and train.

A couple of clubs i've been a member of charge about 20 p/a for membership & insurance.
Another club i'm a member of charge 10 insurance and the membership is charged separately on a sliding scale about 35 for beginners and the higher grade you are the less you pay.

Often martial arts clubs will have a high front end (or start-up) fee as they know the drop out rate is high.

john.burn
02-11-2010, 04:56 AM
Hi Martin,

The cost of Aikido insurance in the UK via the BAB is 1.40, clubs and associations usually then ask for a membership that goes to them directly and is nothing to do with the BAB. Not everyone is a member of the BAB mind you but I guess the numbers involved do indeed keep the costs down.

Charging 40 for insurance sounds like a hell of a lot to me!

As it would appear you're learning Shodokan (Tomiki) then the BAA are members of the BAB, they should be cheaper and might well have a dojo in your area.

Walter Martindale
02-11-2010, 05:02 AM
Don't have insurance in NZ - we have "ACC" (Accident Compensation Corp, I think).
However, in terms of safety, it makes sense that an activity which includes tossing each other around and applying joint locking techniques would require some significant risk management. OTOH, when I was in the Canadian shooting sports (National Firearms Ass'n) we could have a million bucks insurance for $5.00 per annum because the shooting sports are VERY safe... Almost the last place in the world you'll find a person getting shot is at a target range due to usually very strict safety practices.

Sorry if a bit OT.
W

Dazzler
02-11-2010, 06:00 AM
Hi Martin,

The cost of Aikido insurance in the UK via the BAB is 1.40, clubs and associations usually then ask for a membership that goes to them directly and is nothing to do with the BAB. Not everyone is a member of the BAB mind you but I guess the numbers involved do indeed keep the costs down.

Charging 40 for insurance sounds like a hell of a lot to me!

As it would appear you're learning Shodokan (Tomiki) then the BAA are members of the BAB, they should be cheaper and might well have a dojo in your area.

Don't just think that the membership is for the 1.40 though...Federations also pay an Annual subscription which from March will be an additional 3.50 per certificate.

So 5 on annual membership is for BAB ..the rest is for membership of your Federation.

We in NAF charge 20 which seems fairly common practice, I'm not surprised that Tomiki would be more though...even for 'non competitors' I'd expect the risk of training for competion without actually competing would still increase and require an extra contribution to insurers.

That probably a question for the Tomiki organisation to answer though.

Again - I'm not surprised that some university clubs are a lot less. We only charge 10 for unwaged - which most students qualify as, but if there is subsidisation from the Uni then sure, it could well be less.

Cheers

D

Alex Megann
02-11-2010, 07:15 AM
40? That's almost as much as I pay the BAB for Professional Indemnity insurance as an instructor!

Our members pay about 25 per year, which covers membership of the dojo and the BAF (which itself includes BAB accident insurance).

Alex

john.burn
02-11-2010, 07:28 AM
Don't just think that the membership is for the 1.40 though...Federations also pay an Annual subscription which from March will be an additional 3.50 per certificate.

So 5 on annual membership is for BAB ..the rest is for membership of your Federation.

We in NAF charge 20 which seems fairly common practice, I'm not surprised that Tomiki would be more though...even for 'non competitors' I'd expect the risk of training for competion without actually competing would still increase and require an extra contribution to insurers.

That probably a question for the Tomiki organisation to answer though.

Again - I'm not surprised that some university clubs are a lot less. We only charge 10 for unwaged - which most students qualify as, but if there is subsidisation from the Uni then sure, it could well be less.

Cheers

D

Yeah, I forgot the cost for the association met member fee for it's BAB membership. The insurance is definitely only 1.40 or so though. Even so, still a lot less than 60.

If I remember correctly from my previous life as a member of the BAB exec then most of the insurance claims put through were from the Tomiki associations.

Ketsan
02-11-2010, 07:35 AM
We pay about 30, although I think membership in the association is included in that as well.

Abasan
02-11-2010, 08:37 AM
Yeah, I forgot the cost for the association met member fee for it's BAB membership. The insurance is definitely only 1.40 or so though. Even so, still a lot less than 60.

If I remember correctly from my previous life as a member of the BAB exec then most of the insurance claims put through were from the Tomiki associations.

In that respect, us ki dojos should get a discount... :D

Mark Peckett
02-11-2010, 09:51 AM
The organisation I belong to charges 20 annual membership which has been pegged for the last 3 years and 50 instructor's insurance through the BAB so 60 for a 5th kyu does seem high; however, as another poster has pointed out, you are practising tomiki style, which may have more injuries related to it.

How does your insurance compare with a local judo club, for example?

Tom123
02-11-2010, 10:24 AM
Thank you all for your contributions. I reckon Daren and Mark have probably hit the nail on the head - ie the competitive aspect of Tomiki probably pushes the price up. As a 5th kyu, I don't imagine that I'll be doing any competing for a long time.
I once visited my friend's Aikiki club back in my hometown and apart from the Kakari Geiko that we do, the training was very similar.

Mark, I do know a judo yudansha - I'll find out how much he pays.

Thanks

Martin

john.burn
02-11-2010, 10:38 AM
Hi Martin,

I could be wrong, but the BAA are Tomiki and also the largest single association within the BAB, they pay 1.40 for insurance the same as anyone else in the BAB. They may have other insurances in place for competeing but I don't think so or surely they wouldn't be claming in the BAB's normal member to member insurance for injuries.

markyboy64
02-15-2011, 12:09 PM
I'm wondering how much other Brit folks pay for insurance, federation membership etc. I've been advised to join the British Tomiki Aikido Federation, but it's 20 annual membership fee and 40 pounds insurance. 60 a year for a humble 5th kue who is unlikely to enter a competition for a while seems a Hell of a lot of money. The Mrs is likely to do some complaining! I'd be really grateful for any comments and advice concerning this. Thank you. Martin

PS When I did karate (admittedly about 20 year ago) it was all in for a tenner.

Most martial art clubs in the UK are in leisure centers.
If so you don't need insurance,you are already covered by law!(I.E the leisure centre).
Plus what you are paying for"which is a fraction of what is being asked" is third party only insurance.
Which means you would have to sue the person who injured you.
Not the club.

So it's more fraud than insurance.
It's the easiest way for instructors to fleece their students.
Especially as most students give up in the first three months.
OOHH no refund!

So if anybody on here is being asked for insurance money,in clubs,training camps ect....you got MUG written on your forehead.

john.burn
02-16-2011, 06:22 AM
Most martial art clubs in the UK are in leisure centers.
If so you don't need insurance,you are already covered by law!(I.E the leisure centre).
Plus what you are paying for"which is a fraction of what is being asked" is third party only insurance.
Which means you would have to sue the person who injured you.
Not the club.

So it's more fraud than insurance.
It's the easiest way for instructors to fleece their students.
Especially as most students give up in the first three months.
OOHH no refund!

So if anybody on here is being asked for insurance money,in clubs,training camps ect....you got MUG written on your forehead.

Don't really agree with most of what you said here, certainly for me, I pay my students insurance for them (in the BAB, it is now 1.50 no matter who you are, hardly a lot of money) - they only pay to join the association and only then if they stay beyond 4 weeks - before that they don't even pay to train for the first 2 weeks.

markyboy64
02-16-2011, 09:37 AM
Don't really agree with most of what you said here, certainly for me, I pay my students insurance for them (in the BAB, it is now 1.50 no matter who you are, hardly a lot of money) - they only pay to join the association and only then if they stay beyond 4 weeks - before that they don't even pay to train for the first 2 weeks.

No! but you are agreeing to some of it!!

Most people are being ripped OFF!.

1.50 is not the same as 60.
So where is the 58.50 gone?Answer- somebodies back pocket!!

Aikido has become the wing chun,and tkd,of japanese arts.
Weak but expensive.

George S. Ledyard
02-16-2011, 10:46 AM
I'm wondering how much other Brit folks pay for insurance, federation membership etc. I've been advised to join the British Tomiki Aikido Federation, but it's 20 annual membership fee and 40 pounds insurance. 60 a year for a humble 5th kue who is unlikely to enter a competition for a while seems a Hell of a lot of money. The Mrs is likely to do some complaining! I'd be really grateful for any comments and advice concerning this. Thank you. Martin

PS When I did karate (admittedly about 20 year ago) it was all in for a tenner.

My insurance for the dojo is about $9.00 / head. Sounds like they are simply passing on the cost. Totally reasonable as far as I can see. 20 / year is surely not unreasonable as a membership fee either. That's 1.67 / month... that the price of a good espresso drink. That's still got to be one of the cheapest activities around...

Alex Megann
02-16-2011, 10:48 AM
No! but you are agreeing to some of it!!

Most people are being ripped OFF!.

1.50 is not the same as 60.
So where is the 58.50 gone?Answer- somebodies back pocket!!

Aikido has become the wing chun,and tkd,of japanese arts.
Weak but expensive.

I think the conclusion of the discussion here is that the large sum referred to by the original poster is specific to that particular organisation, and not to "most people". Your last statement therefore doesn't apply to most organisations, who pay the 1.50 to the BAB. If the OP objects to the fee demanded by the BTAF, I suggest he tries to find a club affiliated to the BAA.

To my knowledge the BAB insurance covers accident and injury. There is a page on the BAB site with plenty of information on their insurance policies:

http://www.bab.org.uk/insurance/insurance.asp .

Alex

George S. Ledyard
02-16-2011, 10:49 AM
Most martial art clubs in the UK are in leisure centers.
If so you don't need insurance,you are already covered by law!(I.E the leisure centre).
Plus what you are paying for"which is a fraction of what is being asked" is third party only insurance.
Which means you would have to sue the person who injured you.
Not the club.

So it's more fraud than insurance.
It's the easiest way for instructors to fleece their students.
Especially as most students give up in the first three months.
OOHH no refund!

So if anybody on here is being asked for insurance money,in clubs,training camps ect....you got MUG written on your forehead.

If that's what you think is going on with your instructors... I would advise quitting. I wouldn't want to have any student training with me who had that attitude.

john.burn
02-16-2011, 10:59 AM
No! but you are agreeing to some of it!!

Most people are being ripped OFF!.

1.50 is not the same as 60.
So where is the 58.50 gone?Answer- somebodies back pocket!!

Aikido has become the wing chun,and tkd,of japanese arts.
Weak but expensive.

So one guy posts that the British Tomiki Aikido Federation (who i've never heard of) is charging 40 insurance (not 60 - there was 20 for membership fee) so by that very statement most people are being ripped off? In the BAB you are not allowed to add anything onto the cost of insurance, it's 1.50. The clubs / association can opt to charge a membership fee which is obviously fine, don't like it, don't join but I hardly think you can summarise from one person that most people are getting ripped off. Most (but not all) aikido associations in the UK get their insurance from the BAB. So that means over 10,000 people in the UK pay 1.50 per year...

markyboy64
02-17-2011, 05:25 AM
If that's what you think is going on with your instructors... I would advise quitting. I wouldn't want to have any student training with me who had that attitude.

Ofcourse you wouldn't want your students with "that" attitude.
Your techniques wouldn't work against them.
They would be teaching you!!

Putting on white pyjamas two or three times a week,teaching a hobby martial art, to hobbyists,in bare feet does not make one a martial artist!.

Teaching or training techniques means you havn't learned a thing or are teaching for money,and padding out the art.

I stand corrected,it was forty pounds worth of fraud and not sixty!!

BTW...I would advise quitting,afterall you,ve never hurt anybody!

john.burn
02-17-2011, 06:44 AM
Ofcourse you wouldn't want your students with "that" attitude.
Your techniques wouldn't work against them.
They would be teaching you!!

Putting on white pyjamas two or three times a week,teaching a hobby martial art, to hobbyists,in bare feet does not make one a martial artist!.

Teaching or training techniques means you havn't learned a thing or are teaching for money,and padding out the art.

I stand corrected,it was forty pounds worth of fraud and not sixty!!

BTW...I would advise quitting,afterall you,ve never hurt anybody!

Joy, just what this place needs, yet another troll.

Please enlighten us all oh great one. After all, you are your own teacher apparently. What is it you learn so much about from your great self?

So please tell us what your background is...

Mark Freeman
02-17-2011, 09:18 AM
Joy, just what this place needs, yet another troll.

Please enlighten us all oh great one. After all, you are your own teacher apparently. What is it you learn so much about from your great self?

So please tell us what your background is...

Hi John,

then don't go feeding him:crazy: they thrive on direct questions, they only wither and die through being completely ignored.

If he was offered to practice for free, it would not change the contempt that he holds aikido practice in. I'm wondering about someone that comes to join Aikiweb who clearly has no interest in adding anything of any value?

regards

Mark

john.burn
02-17-2011, 12:22 PM
I know... it just gets tedious with these people, sometimes it's fun to bait... lol

George S. Ledyard
02-17-2011, 12:34 PM
No! but you are agreeing to some of it!!

Most people are being ripped OFF!.

1.50 is not the same as 60.
So where is the 58.50 gone?Answer- somebodies back pocket!!

Aikido has become the wing chun,and tkd,of japanese arts.
Weak but expensive.

Maybe things are different in the UK from the States but Aikido here is far and away the cheapest martial art to do where you can find dedicated dojos. There are, of course, many martial arts taught at community centers. They are uniformly priced but the quality of instruction can be quite uneven, you have to know what you are looking for.

But when it comes to actual dojos where you would typically find the most experienced teachers, Aikido costs are FAR below the typical costs of the other martial arts. The national AVERAGE for martial arts instruction in the US is about $140 / month. There are twenty dojos in the immediate Seattle area of which I am on the high end of monthly dues at $120 / month. So, the most expensive Aikido school in our entire area is well under the national average for martial arts instruction.

Mark Freeman
02-17-2011, 12:57 PM
I'm wondering how much other Brit folks pay for insurance, federation membership etc. I've been advised to join the British Tomiki Aikido Federation, but it's 20 annual membership fee and 40 pounds insurance. 60 a year for a humble 5th kue who is unlikely to enter a competition for a while seems a Hell of a lot of money. The Mrs is likely to do some complaining! I'd be really grateful for any comments and advice concerning this. Thank you. Martin

PS When I did karate (admittedly about 20 year ago) it was all in for a tenner.

Hi Martin,

Not sure if you drink or smoke at all, if you do then you will realise that pro rata a years that membership would cost you a few pence over 1 per week, that is equivalent to less than 1/2 pint of the cheapest beer or 4 or 5 cigarettes!

The federation I belong to charges fully waged folk 38 / year. I charge monthly fees of 40 ($60) for 2x2hr sessions / week. The insurance for students is included in those fees.

It's not expensive, the real cost is time and mental and physical commitment:)

regards

Mark

danj
02-17-2011, 04:43 PM
In Australia insurance comprises offer many different products and you get what you pay. Some products are professional indemnity for the instructor, public liability for the equipment/space you use, directors insurance for the club office bearers and medical and accident insurance for members. Lots of layers to the onion of protection and expensive if you want them all. Premiums get cheaper the more people you have in the policy, the more you can document risk management processes and legal status of you organisation.

Keith Burnikell
02-26-2011, 11:22 AM
Mark,
I've trained with Mr. Ledyard. If you get a chance to do so, you'd be 'enlightened'. ;)

Ofcourse you wouldn't want your students with "that" attitude.
Your techniques wouldn't work against them.
They would be teaching you!!

Putting on white pyjamas two or three times a week,teaching a hobby martial art, to hobbyists,in bare feet does not make one a martial artist!.

Teaching or training techniques means you havn't learned a thing or are teaching for money,and padding out the art.

I stand corrected,it was forty pounds worth of fraud and not sixty!!

BTW...I would advise quitting,afterall you,ve never hurt anybody!

markyboy64
02-27-2011, 01:58 PM
Hi John,

then don't go feeding him:crazy: they thrive on direct questions, they only wither and die through being completely ignored.

If he was offered to practice for free, it would not change the contempt that he holds aikido practice in. I'm wondering about someone that comes to join Aikiweb who clearly has no interest in adding anything of any value?

regards

Mark

Mark! you only live a short distance from me!
I would like to invite you down to Plympton ,Plymouth.

We can train in a friendly exchange of knowledge!

Bring some beer tokens too!;)

Mark Freeman
02-28-2011, 04:09 AM
Mark! you only live a short distance from me!
I would like to invite you down to Plympton ,Plymouth.

We can train in a friendly exchange of knowledge!

Bring some beer tokens too!;)

Hi Mark,

you are from Plympton, you might just beat me up and steal my beer tokens!:D

I could do that as long as we agree it is a friendly exchange of knowledge. Do you have a practice space? what is your practice anyway?

regards,

Mark

markyboy64
02-28-2011, 07:31 AM
Hi Mark,

you are from Plympton, you might just beat me up and steal my beer tokens!:D

I could do that as long as we agree it is a friendly exchange of knowledge. Do you have a practice space? what is your practice anyway?

regards,

Mark

Hi,

I teach what bagua and taiji were ment to be...a down right 100 % dirty fighting system,without learning forms,katas,or walking the circle which just hides the body mechanics.

We do natural abstract drills that teach very powerful body mechanics.Without thinking you learn "techniques" subcontiously.

Mark,training is friendly!

You may bring friends if you wish(they can look after your beer tokens;)).However if you can't do nikyo on me(two at a time if you bring friends) you're buying!;)

Regards mark.

Mark Freeman
02-28-2011, 07:51 AM
Hi,

I teach what bagua and taiji were ment to be...a down right 100 % dirty fighting system,without learning forms,katas,or walking the circle which just hides the body mechanics.

We do natural abstract drills that teach very powerful body mechanics.Without thinking you learn "techniques" subcontiously.

Mark,training is friendly!

You may bring friends if you wish(they can look after your beer tokens;)).However if you can't do nikyo on me(two at a time if you bring friends) you're buying!;)

Regards mark.

Hi Mark,

I'll PM you for details of when you practice, as I would like to come and see and feel what you do.

I'll come alone initially as I don't feel I need anything more than me in a friendly learning environment.

And if I can apply nikkyo? I assume you will be happy to cough up:)

regards,

Mark

markyboy64
02-28-2011, 08:42 AM
Hi Mark,

I'll PM you for details of when you practice, as I would like to come and see and feel what you do.

I'll come alone initially as I don't feel I need anything more than me in a friendly learning environment.

And if I can apply nikkyo? I assume you will be happy to cough up:)

regards,

Mark

Mark! I will stand on one leg while you apply it,and give you half a chance to hold on to the beer tokens..I love free beer!;).

Yes, pm me and we will work something out.
I train everyday so what ever suits you is fine with me!

mark.

RoisinPitman
03-06-2011, 10:27 AM
No! but you are agreeing to some of it!!

Most people are being ripped OFF!.

1.50 is not the same as 60.
So where is the 58.50 gone?Answer- somebodies back pocket!!

Aikido has become the wing chun,and tkd,of japanese arts.
Weak but expensive.

That's quite a sweeping statement that you make and suggests that some people are dishonestly pocketing money for which you have no proof. I am not so naive as to believe that it doesn't go on somewhere in the martial arts community but make a blanket assumption is not helpful to anyone.

Re Insurance. Everyone and every organisation is different, one size does not fit all. My school, based in Jersey, is an independent organisation. We have on average approximately 30 students across three arts (aikido, iai-do and t'ai chi). As an independent group we have insurance cover for all students for an annual fee of approximately 320 (this includes administration fees from the insurance company). Our Instructors pay their own PI insurance of 60 per year and our students pay the equivalent of 2.50 per month. None of my students or the Instructors pay a membership fee, only a monthly training fee.

My point is this - any club or organisation can get the same Club Insurance as my group (approx 320 per annum). Depending on the number of students in that group/organisation will determine what is charged to each indicvidual for their personal insurance contribution.

The B.A.A. has been mentioned (1.40 approx.) an organisation I used to belong to in the dim and distant past when the Kaishinkai (traditional arm of it) used to be affiliated to it, is a very large organisation and do not have to charge much for each student. If a group has independent insurance for a group of 10 people then obviously that contribution will climb steeply or the club would have to charge very high mat fees instead. I won't insult anyone further by doing the maths.

Tom123
03-09-2011, 05:49 PM
Most martial art clubs in the UK are in leisure centers.
If so you don't need insurance,you are already covered by law!(I.E the leisure centre).
Plus what you are paying for"which is a fraction of what is being asked" is third party only insurance.
Which means you would have to sue the person who injured you.
Not the club.

So it's more fraud than insurance.
It's the easiest way for instructors to fleece their students.
Especially as most students give up in the first three months.
OOHH no refund!

So if anybody on here is being asked for insurance money,in clubs,training camps ect....you got MUG written on your forehead.

Hi

I'm the original poster - sorry - have been unable to come on here for a while. Well, the cost of insurance remains controversial, but I can tell you categorically that my sensei does not take a penny from the mat fees (he is a member of my extended family) and we do not get charged for gradings. His reward is seeing students improve.

Mark, the fact that you cite yourself as your 'primary teacher' and your backyard as your dojo, does...er.... set alarm bells ringing.

Martin

markyboy64
03-10-2011, 04:30 AM
Hi

I'm the original poster - sorry - have been unable to come on here for a while. Well, the cost of insurance remains controversial, but I can tell you categorically that my sensei does not take a penny from the mat fees (he is a member of my extended family) and we do not get charged for gradings. His reward is seeing students improve.

Mark, the fact that you cite yourself as your 'primary teacher' and your backyard as your dojo, does...er.... set alarm bells ringing.

Martin

Martin, I have been practicing martial arts for over thirty years,I can tell you if you are not" teaching yourself",you have not learned a thing.

The internal arts are based primarily on physical balance and body unity for whole body power.With gravity.

There are no techniques per se in the internal arts except natural motion,not learned techniques!

The begining of every taiji form starts with lift hands,which is just a version of the fright reaction(fajing)dropping energy.Plyometrics in pragmatic English.
Bagua does the same as taiji,just a series of smooth,fluid fright reactions,whilst training dynamic balance.

The balance needed in both arts(incuding aikido or sports)is the most important thing,as without great balance your power will be less,and get frittered away.

NOBODY!! can teach you dynamic balance,you have to" train" it,at home or in your BACKYARD,everyday so you can move and strike,kick,throw,with alot of power.Catch and surpass your teachers in a short space of time,weeks,months,not years!

The internal arts are abstract,which means adapt,make your own techniques up.
The more opened minded you are the faster you will teach yourself.

Your alarm bells should really be ringing now!

Regards Mark.

aikidoprincipal
05-12-2011, 10:18 AM
Hi Martin,
If the club or association is part of the BAB then only 4-15 goes towards your insurance and subscription to the BAB. (that is the current fees 2011). If the Aikido is what you want then you are paying just over a pound per week, not a bad price for the insurance cover you get.

john.burn
05-12-2011, 10:46 AM
Hi Martin,
If the club or association is part of the BAB then only 4-15 goes towards your insurance and subscription to the BAB. (that is the current fees 2011). If the Aikido is what you want then you are paying just over a pound per week, not a bad price for the insurance cover you get.

Hi Paul,

It's actually just 1.65...Whatever your own association charges you is them making money - the BAB charges your association 1.65 for normal student level insurance. They may recently have changed to a per student subscription too though, seems to ring a bell but the insurance is definitely only 1.65

aikidoprincipal
05-12-2011, 11:41 AM
Hi Paul,

It's actually just 1.65...Whatever your own association charges you is them making money - the BAB charges your association 1.65 for normal student level insurance. They may recently have changed to a per student subscription too though, seems to ring a bell but the insurance is definitely only 1.65

Yes indeed, but the subscription is 2-50 so any club in the BAB has to pay that with the insurance premium of 1-65

sakumeikan
05-12-2011, 06:22 PM
Hi Martin,

The cost of Aikido insurance in the UK via the BAB is 1.40, clubs and associations usually then ask for a membership that goes to them directly and is nothing to do with the BAB. Not everyone is a member of the BAB mind you but I guess the numbers involved do indeed keep the costs down.

Charging 40 for insurance sounds like a hell of a lot to me!

As it would appear you're learning Shodokan (Tomiki) then the BAA are members of the BAB, they should be cheaper and might well have a dojo in your area.
Dear John.
Recent changes to the B.A.B Personal Indemnity Insurance for Instructors means that in the case of level 3 Instructors the cost of this premium is now over 50.00.If the Instructor has two venues the cost is doubled.This is due to the fact that the dojo is the insured not the person.So although the B.A.B membership might be 1.40 the overall costs are 1.B.A.B membership fee.2.Instructors/dojo fees.
3. The fee to your groups parent body.4. Any teaching certification your group may have i.e Shidoin Fee , Fukushidoin fee.
So when you add it all together it comes to a few bob.Enough to get me a wee dram and a stick of rock in Blackpool [and a kiss me quick hat-very fetching].Hope you are well, Cheers, Joe