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Erik
08-09-2000, 03:02 PM
I'm curious what you all are reading? I guess I'm really asking because I can't find anything interesting in the book store.

aikido4life
08-09-2000, 03:07 PM
I just finished "Complete Aikido". The first half of the book mostly told the life story of Suenaka Sensei, and he has led a most interesting life. I really enjoyed it.

Gary

Nick
08-09-2000, 03:09 PM
aikido4life-

are you a wadokai student? I got that as soon as I could, not only as a good book but also to help with my training. If so, what dojo do u train at?

As for me, I'm digging into "Moving Toward Stillness" by Dave Lowry and "Gaijin" by Clavell.

-Nick

aikido4life
08-09-2000, 03:15 PM
-Nick-

No, I'm not. If I wasn't so happy where I am I would really consider it though. I gained so much respect for Suenaka Sensei.

Gary

akiy
08-09-2000, 04:00 PM
I just got back from Summer Camp so I'm not reading anything actively. I did just finish two John Irving books ("A Widow for One Year" and "The Cider House Rules") and "Memoir of a Geisha."

As for budo books, I just picked up a book called "Effortless Combat Throws" which was recommended to me by a friend. Looks pretty interesting.

-- Jun

DJM
08-09-2000, 06:35 PM
This week I'm mostly reading Aikido and the Harmony of Nature, by Saotome..
Top book, but very deep..
Excellent reading :)

Peace,
David

Nick
08-09-2000, 07:18 PM
Gary-

I agree... I originally only got it as a training manual but I got very involved in it- finished it in like 2 days, because it's summer and I got nothin better to do :).

So far, unless this book has a horrible end, I'd recommend anything by Lowry, assuming his other books are as good.

-Nick

shadow
08-09-2000, 07:37 PM
not reading any aikido concerned books, don't have any. Anyone know of any books dedicated to beginners.....say 5th and 4th kyu?

Nick
08-09-2000, 07:48 PM
heh- to have a beginner's manual to Aikido would be an Aikido concerned book wouldn't it?

Unless of course u mean beginner of any style- in which case I recommend Living the Martial Way by Forrest Morgan... doesn't address any one budo, but is still an excellent read. Kodo by Kensho Furuya is also highly recommended.

Cheers,

-Nick

Erik
08-09-2000, 08:19 PM
shadow wrote:
not reading any aikido concerned books, don't have any. Anyone know of any books dedicated to beginners.....say 5th and 4th kyu?

I'm open to any books as my immediate reading future is a book on web design (the most interesting) and 2 books on asp (groan!).

I don't know of too many books specifically designed for that kyu level. If I remember correctly a book titled "The Aikido Student Handbook" may fit the bill.

The first Aikido book I read was Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere by Westbrook and Ratti. I've also enjoyed Aikido by Kisshomaru Ueshiba and "The Principles of Aikido" by Mitsugi Saotome.

A couple of other books that I've also enjoyed that maybe don't hit the main stream as much are "It's a Lot Like Dancing: An Aikido Journal" which is essentially a collection of short stories involving Terry Dobson and his book "Giving in to Get Your Way". I got to know Terry (through a friend) a very teeny tiny bit and he was to say the least, "an interesting fellow".

Tony Peters
08-09-2000, 08:36 PM
Well I just finished "East of the mountains" By Gutterson (the guy who wrote "Snow falling on Cedars") and started Hemingway's "Moveable feast" Oh, Bodo related "Sword of no sword" by John Stevens, Gordon & Drager's "the Japanese sword" "Bunken Iai" by Mitani & Mitani (wish I had a japanese to english OCR translation for this) Oh and indirectly related to Budo, "Combat Conditioning" by Matt Furey. This is by far the best "exercise " book I have ever seen or owned. All body weight exercises (read Calisthetics) that have drasticly improved my Martial arts practice. I've also been up to my Ears in Photography books but that's work related.

Pete
08-10-2000, 03:10 AM
I have read Dynamic Aikido by Gozo Shioda, which helped me a lot with my basics (I am in a Yoshinkan Dojo!!), and whilst on Holiday I read Angry White Pyjamas by Robert Twigger. A Very good read in an autobiographical way!!!

A friend (also an Aikidoka) wants to know if anyone can recommend a book that covers the more spiritual side of the art!!

Any ideas??

nomad
08-10-2000, 09:14 AM
Pete wrote:
I have read Dynamic Aikido by Gozo Shioda, which helped me a lot with my basics (I am in a Yoshinkan Dojo!!), and whilst on Holiday I read Angry White Pyjamas by Robert Twigger. A Very good read in an autobiographical way!!!

A friend (also an Aikidoka) wants to know if anyone can recommend a book that covers the more spiritual side of the art!!

Any ideas?? 1 of: The Spiritual Foundations of Aikido [Paperback]
By: William Gleason

nomad
08-10-2000, 09:15 AM
1 of: The Spiritual Foundations of Aikido [Paperback]
By: William Gleason
sorry about that im still getting used to using this :-)

Nick
08-10-2000, 10:35 AM
So far, I've also enjoyed The Spirit of Aikido by Kisshoumaru Ueshiba, former Doshu, though I'm only about 20 pages into it.

-Nick

Erik
08-10-2000, 10:42 AM
Pete wrote:I have read Dynamic Aikido by Gozo Shioda, which helped me a lot with my basics (I am in a Yoshinkan Dojo!!), and whilst on Holiday I read Angry White Pyjamas by Robert Twigger. A Very good read in an autobiographical way!!!

A friend (also an Aikidoka) wants to know if anyone can recommend a book that covers the more spiritual side of the art!!

Any ideas??

The Magic of Conflict by Tom Crum.

Tony Peters
08-10-2000, 03:09 PM
Pete wrote:


A friend (also an Aikidoka) wants to know if anyone can recommend a book that covers the more spiritual side of the art!!

Any ideas??

Gleason's book is good, also Satome's "Aikido and the Haromony of nature" You should also check out Wendy Palmer's "Intuitive Body : Aikido As a Clairsentient Practice" For a Left Coast vieaw of Aikido its suprisingly good.

DJM
08-10-2000, 04:40 PM
Nick wrote:
So far, unless this book has a horrible end, I'd recommend anything by Lowry, assuming his other books are as good.
-Nick

Nick,
Moving Toward Stillness remains one of the best Budo-related books I've ever read, as is Sword and Brush also by Mr Lowry. I'm biased, admittedly, as reading Moving Toward Stillness, at the right time for me, brought me back to Aikido...
As for Persimmon Wind, also by Mr Lowry, an excellent book, but a shame about the editing/spelling..
Don't suppose any UK Aikidoka have a copy of Autumn Lightning they'd consider lending out?
Tried a number of places for copies - out of print now.. :(

Peace,
David

adriangan
08-11-2000, 06:41 AM
shadow wrote:
not reading any aikido concerned books, don't have any. Anyone know of any books dedicated to beginners.....say 5th and 4th kyu?

I'm currently reading "Aikido and the Dynimc Sphere" by Oscar Ratti and Adele Westbrook and I'd recommend it to beginners, it has a good balance between techniques and principles. I also got a lot out of Saotome Sensei's "The Principles of Aikido" when I started my training.

Pete wrote:

A friend (also an Aikidoka) wants to know if anyone can recommend a book that covers the more spiritual side of the art!!

Any ideas??


I'd recommend John Stevens' "The Secrets of Aikido", very deep.


-Adrian

BC
08-11-2000, 09:21 AM
I'm just about to (finally) start reading Shogun. Like Jun, I just got back from Summer Camp and I feel more like reading something lighter like historical fiction right now. For a spiritual book on the martial arts, I would recommend "The Zen Way to the Martial Arts" by Taisen Deshimaru.

By the way, has anyone read "Beyond the Known" by Tri Thong Dang, and if so would you recommend it?

[Edited by BC on August 11, 2000 at 08:27am]

Nick
08-11-2000, 09:45 AM
Can't recommend that one book (never read it) but go for it on Shogun- that book rules, and is actually based off of a real story...

-Nick

Horselord
08-11-2000, 11:01 AM
A good book dealing with the spiritual side of Aikido is "The Essence Of Aikido, Spiritual Teachings of Morihei Ueshiba". It is compiled by John Stevens. Some of the subjects covered in the book are, Songs of the Path, Moreihei's Calligraphic Legacy, and Misogi. A great read. Check it out!

Paul

Nick
08-11-2000, 06:54 PM
DJM wrote:


Don't suppose any UK Aikidoka have a copy of Autumn Lightning they'd consider lending out?
Tried a number of places for copies - out of print now.. :(

Peace,
David

I got my copy from Amazon.com- dunno if they'd deliver to the UK.

I have yet to read it, gotta finish all the other books I got for my birthday.

Kanpai and good luck,

-Nick

Ronald
08-12-2000, 10:27 AM
I would recommend "Toward the Known" by Tri Thong Dang. It is an easily read book in parable form, about a young fellow who starts out as a rude, ignorant fool and through a series of lessons and life experiences, guided by his teacher, becomes a complete martial artist.

Also, take a shot at "The Art of Living" by Epictetus. It is a first century greek work -- Sharon Lebell's translation is very plain english, and reading it, you will find a good example of a western philosophy which is very close to what you may identify as "eastern philosophy".

Cheers,
Ron

Nick
08-13-2000, 07:28 AM
hmm... I just started "The Life we are given" By George Leonard- judging by the first few chapters, I think it's quite good.

I also started Autumn Lightning, since I have too much extra time when I only read two chapters a day of "Moving Towards Stillness."

-Nick

Pete
08-14-2000, 03:04 AM
I have just started reading Shogun by James Clavell!! (Bought this Saturday!!)

Seems pretty good so far, one of those can't put down types of book!!

Have to point out hough that there is no indication at all on either the cover notes or author notes that this is based on a 'true story' as someone mentioned!!

Still, that doesn't in any way detract from the read though!!

Chuck Clark
08-14-2000, 10:04 AM
Hi Pete,

Clavell took several historical characters, added many more from his own imagination and took bits and parts of historical events plus huge amounts of fiction and put them all into the story called "Shogun."

It is a good story, but not based on a "real" series of events that were even remotely similar.

The tv mini-series is well worth renting from the video store and spending a weekend just for the beautiful scenery and the masterful acting of Toshiro Mifune.

Regards,

Pete
08-14-2000, 10:09 AM
Is that the one with Richard Chamberlain as Anjin-san?

Chuck Clark
08-14-2000, 01:35 PM
Yes.

Kind of soppy in places, but still beautiful scenery, etc. and like I said, then there's Toshiro Mifune!

Nick
08-14-2000, 06:36 PM
OT for this post, but:

If you want a good show of Mifune's kenjutsu and acting, check out the "Samurai" series deatiling the life of Shimmen Takezo (better known as Miyamoto Musashi). They're excellent...

-Nick

Suru
08-14-2000, 09:09 PM
I've found there to be many parallels between aikido and Buddhism. Although Shinto is the primary religion of Japan, the Buddhists' views on meditation and the search for enlightenment does not seem much different from aikido philosophy. Therefore I recommend two books--The Compass of Zen, and Awakening the Sleeping Buddha. I am learning that we all have the potential to become buddhas, one of which--in my opinion--was O'Sensei.
--Drew

Pete
08-18-2000, 03:07 AM
I am now about a third of the way through James Clavell's Shogun!!

Very very good so far!!

Nick
09-02-2000, 06:58 PM
Yeah- heh it's a really good history lesson if you change to names to the proper ones (Nakamura=Hideyoshi, Toranaga=tokugawa, Blackthorne=will adams etc).

I've just started Gai-jin, the 'sequel' in sorts. Only about 20 pages in, but it seems good so far :).

-Nick