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Maarten De Queecker
09-29-2009, 06:26 PM
I much appreciate your ten pence. He is a great example of trying to be overconfident at first, and then coming close to, or at, peace-of-mind. I would actually give you a couple British Pound Sterlings for your post. I only have one on me at the moment, a gift from an English friend. I know I'm swaying off my own topic, but I like it how the English say, "went to university," instead of the American, "went to college." I hope the world comes together sometime, but I also hope that we keep much of our ethnic and national culture. This is the spice of life.

Drew

Completely off-topic, but is there a difference between the BrE University and AmE college? I thought Americans had universities too, and colleges were a level below university.

Voitokas
09-29-2009, 07:13 PM
In the U.S., colleges grant 4-year undergraduate degrees and sometimes Master's degrees, professional colleges like medical or pharmacy schools will grant specialised degrees, and universities grant undergraduate degrees, Master's degrees, and Doctorates, and may have associated special graduate schools in medicine, etc. attached. There are outliers in naming, like Dartmouth College, which is a university, but for the most part this holds true.

Hebrew Hammer
09-29-2009, 10:40 PM
Completely off-topic, but is there a difference between the BrE University and AmE college? I thought Americans had universities too, and colleges were a level below university.

Colleges and Universities are often used interchangeably in the US. We go off to 'college' to attend a state 'university'. We do have lots of smaller local colleges called "community colleges" or 'junior colleges' that offer two year Associates degrees.

Another example: Boston College and Boston University are separate 4 year universities.

ninjaqutie
09-29-2009, 11:59 PM
It seems that most colleges are smaller then universites. I went to college for my undergraduate degree at a small, private college (they do associate, bachelor and master degrees) and I went to a small, private though slightly bigger student body-wise university for grad school (they also did bachelor and master programs).

I would say that most people use them interchangeably, but it does seem that universitys are bigger student-wise, have smaler schools within (such as business shcool, med school, etc), offer phd degrees and can also be more focused on research instead of learning. What does wikipedia say? :o

It should be noted, like previously mentioned that college's aren't necessarily worse then universities. In fact, several colleges are more picky and offer a better education then a university could. It just really depends on the place.

dps
09-30-2009, 12:58 AM
Locally we have Youngstown State University. It is a state funded university. Within the academic structure they have:

Williamson College of Business Administration
College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
College of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
and more. http://www.ysu.edu/sitemap/index.php/departmentsCollegesSchools/
All on the same campus.

I wonder is this a typical structure for American Universities?
Do British Universities have a similar structure?

David

Mark Freeman
09-30-2009, 04:12 AM
I wonder is this a typical structure for American Universities?
Do British Universities have a similar structure?

Of course, my guess is that the US stucture is based on the GB system:)

regards,

Mark

Voitokas
09-30-2009, 04:51 AM
It is typical for a University to have internal colleges, since the US system was based on the British system. Normally U.S. universities have a College of Arts and Sciences, a College of Fine Arts, a College of Agriculture (if a land-grant university, etc.) - and how separate these are depends on the school. I would say, personally, that there is a better undergraduate education to be had at a private college than at a university in the U.S. - but as ninjacutie said, most people use them interchangeably.

Rob Watson
09-30-2009, 08:26 PM
In the U.S., colleges grant 4-year undergraduate degrees and sometimes Master's degrees, professional colleges like medical or pharmacy schools will grant specialised degrees, and universities grant undergraduate degrees, Master's degrees, and Doctorates, and may have associated special graduate schools in medicine, etc. attached. There are outliers in naming, like Dartmouth College, which is a university, but for the most part this holds true.

San Francisco State University does grant masters degrees in many subjects and a PhD only in education. Kind of a mixed bag. I suspect the distinction mentioned above is not quite true in many cases.

I think it is true that most community colleges do only offer 2 years associate degrees as well as vocational apprecticeships but no bachleors or higher degrees.

There are plenty of colleges that offer higher degrees. Kind of jumbled.

Funny thing in california there is the CSU (california state university system) and the UC (university of california system) that are both state run institutions but one certainly does not want to mix UCSF with USF nor SFSU because someone might get hurt.

Arguably if there is an modelling after the british system then william and mary college (the US first institution of higher learning) would bear the closest relationship. It certainly offers graduate degrees and has associated institutes and schools (as in institue of marine biology) as oppsed to a constellation of colleges like the university system. Still kind of murky.

You know us americans like to go our seperate ways so each state is different and even counties within a given state can have wildly different rules, regs and laws. Pretty jumbled situation.

Michael Douglas
10-01-2009, 04:16 AM
In England the two words are used interchangeably ... UNLESS we are trying to be specific.
Recently a load of scummy poly's changed name to unis ... but we REAL uni grads sneer on them.
They are both 'college' though.

Basia Halliop
10-01-2009, 11:27 AM
Yeah, I always used to find that confusing in american TV and stuff. Where I come from, there are universities, and there are colleges, and they are two completely separate and different things. If you are going to college, you get certain kinds of diplomas (e.g., you could train to be a police officer, a tradesperson, a haridresser, you could do a program in hospitality or culinary arts). If you're going to university, it means you're taking courses towards a Bachelor or Masters or PhD in something (usually a bachelor as that's where most people stop).

So here you wouldn't say 'I'm going off to college' or "I'm a college student", unless you're going to college.

I think an "Associate's degree" must be a US thing too? I had never heard of one until I heard an American mention it. I doubt many people would know what it meant if you told them you had one.

Kevin Leavitt
10-01-2009, 11:53 AM
It is the College OF William and Mary and they still maintain ties with Britian based on their heritage. The Queen has visited it several times.

http://web.wm.edu/hermajesty/history.php

My wife is a graduate!

David Maidment
10-01-2009, 02:35 PM
Around here, 'college' is where you get your A-Levels and 'university' is where you get your bachelors/masters degree (plus anything post-grad).