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Rob Watson
08-28-2009, 07:20 PM
Budo
Budo Renshu
Takemusu Aiki lectures
Douka
The films of the founder?

What would be considered the canon of aikido? Are they available in english?

When asked 'what is aikido' would not the canon be the first answer?

Walker
08-29-2009, 12:48 AM
When asked 'what is aikido' would not the canon be the first answer?

Tohei is way ahead of you. After you write "What is Aikido" then you write "This is Aikido".

Rob Watson
08-29-2009, 02:06 AM
What Tohei says is more indicative than what Ueshiba says?

CitoMaramba
08-29-2009, 05:11 AM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31tp%2BbXv0QL._SL500_AA218_.jpghttp://www.trussel.com/aikido/books/tohei7.jpg

dps
08-29-2009, 06:24 AM
Budo
Budo Renshu
Takemusu Aiki lectures
Douka
The films of the founder?

What would be considered the canon of aikido? Are they available in english?

When asked 'what is aikido' would not the canon be the first answer?

Canon as in the works of the author then yes, but you also have the canons of the disciples of O'Sensei; Tohei, Tomiki, Shioda,etc.

David

Mark Uttech
08-29-2009, 06:33 AM
Onegaishimasu. "Budo" by Morihei Ueshiba O Sensei is a good place to start.

In gassho,

Mark

CitoMaramba
08-29-2009, 09:23 AM
Mas Oyama could recognise a good marketing strategy:
http://www.budovideos.com/images/covers/5381.jpghttp://www.budovideos.com/images/covers/5400.jpg

Don_Modesto
08-29-2009, 11:30 AM
What would be considered the canon of aikido? Are they available in english?

When asked 'what is aikido' would not the canon be the first answer?IRIMI NAGE? KOTE GAESHI? IKKYO?...

Flintstone
08-29-2009, 12:23 PM
Canon? What canon?

Keith Larman
08-29-2009, 01:41 PM
A Takashima cannon, of course... ;)

Keith Larman
08-29-2009, 01:44 PM
And on a totally serious note... I'd suggest there ain't one for Aikido in a general sense today. However, most organizations have their own internal publications which I would guess are more or less the "official" canons of each style and approach.

That said I'd also say reading Dr. Goldsbury's wonderful articles on history they would be a very good reference for that aspect. And I'm almost done with Ellis Amdur's latest book -- Hidden in Plain Sight. Wonderful insights and history there as well.

Lyle Bogin
08-29-2009, 07:53 PM
I'd just go to aikido journal and read everything available there. Many of the books on aikido that are worth reading are out of print. I noticed Saito's "Traditional Aikido" is slowly coming back into print!!! A great opportunity for those of us having trouble finding the cash for original, quality copies.

I would say any of the work by Osensei or his direct students qualifies.

David Orange
08-30-2009, 12:19 AM
I don't remember who it was but somebody asked me if I'd ever heard of Mifune, of judo. He said, "They called him the Cannon of Judo, I guess because he could hit you so hard."

CitoMaramba
08-30-2009, 09:19 AM
I don't remember who it was but somebody asked me if I'd ever heard of Mifune, of judo. He said, "They called him the Cannon of Judo, I guess because he could hit you so hard."
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51lficXz78L._SS500_.jpg

Rob Watson
08-30-2009, 01:56 PM
I like the open ended questions the best because they tend to apply the posters bias a bit less ...

http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16732

The above link essentially makes my point.

Want to learn general relativity? Study mathematics and physics. I can give a list of spceifc texts that tend to be considered the 'canon'. Many of these works start by building a foundation based on materials centuries old - even calculus is approaching 400 years in age. With these texts one can reasonably learn in only a few years the secrets of general relativity. Of course, the help of 'one who has gone before' can speed things along and offer a few 'flavors' as well. Even with mastery of the subject a lifetime of discovery awaits and one can even add to the canon if remarkable works are wrought. Some even argue this study gives one a glimpse onto the inner works of the divine. If ones teacher makes certain statements about the subject one can, and if well formed, can refute these assertions based on the materials in the canon. This kind of 'checks and balances' is critical to keep everyone firmly on point and true to the art.

What of aikido? Ponder with me if you will the state of the art 100, even 400, years hence. Given the current state of affairs in which there is already considerable divergence of opinion on the veracity of the 'purity' and capacity of the current mode(s) of transmission in the art shall we be satisfied that all is well and simply carry one or perhaps something else?

Shall we have to wait ~400 years like the poor christians before a collection of writings are put forth as the 'canon'? Given the cohesiveness of the collection of folks claiming the be christians perhaps this can serve as an example of the merits of the approach or perhaps the danger of waiting 400 years. Lets us not forget that there is another collection of writings similarly aged that did not get into the canon but were in 'vogue' at various stages before and even after being rejected for inclusion into the canon. Some works are discovered even in recent times that give one pause due to their veracity.

Whether one is proactive (let's do something about it) or retrospective (let's see what happens) the longer we wait the more obvious it will become just how wrong (or right) we were in our choices. I firmly believe it is much more wise to put in place a means of efficient transmission than it is to count on those that follow to figure it out for themselves. O'sensei gave us a mission to build heaven on earth through aikido - it is our honor bound duty to carry out this mission. The question still stands - how is this best accomplished?