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David Orange
08-10-2009, 01:01 PM
This is to announce the publication of “The Art of Ju-jutsu,” the most comprehensive volume on yoseikan budo ever produced in the English language.

http://www.amazon.com/Art-Ju-jutsu-Edgar-Kruyning/dp/1409282694/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1249922211&sr=1-1

Subtitled “the legacy of Minoru Mochizuki’s yoseikan sogo budo, a dynamic synthesis of modern and traditional martial arts,” this book gives the most detailed and authoritative review available of the unique art created by Minoru Mochizuki, one of the earliest uchi deshi of aikido founder Morihei Ueshiba, in his home dojo in Shizuoka City, Japan. It also gives extensive detail on the modern yoseikan budo of Hiroo Mochizuki, current international head of yoseikan budo, allowing the reader to find the commonalities and striking differences between the approaches of a father and son devoted to budo. Earning the following ranks since his beginning in budo at age 13 (turning forty this month), Edgar Kruyning is well-qualified, both physically and intellectually, to present the essence of Japanese martial arts:

6th dan Judo
6th dan Yoseikan-Aikido
6th dan Ju Jutsu
5th dan Yoseikan-Budo
5th dan Iaido
5th dan Aikibudo
5th dan Kobudo
2nd dan Karate

“The Art of Ju-jutsu” reflects Minoru Mochizuki’s teaching that aikido is a form of ju-jutsu, which he considered a unique expression of Japanese culture to be preserved, developed and given to the world. “The Art of Ju-jutsu” is the best English resource available on the arts of yoseikan.

Published by lulu.com, available on Amazon and elsewhere, “The Art of Ju-jutsu” will be a valued addition to any serious martial artist’s library. Densely illustrated with hundreds of high-quality photographs, the text provides rare insight into this important martial arts tradition. Preface by Patrick McCarthy.

Joshua Sloan
08-10-2009, 01:38 PM
Good find! And thanks for letting everybody know. Good published information of the Yoseikan style can be rather difficult to come by in English.

And now, the hard part: practicing patience while waiting for my copy to come in the mail!

Thanks again!
Josh

lezard39
08-14-2009, 12:44 PM
Thanks Mr.Orange, I was waiting for this one!

Here is the link of an other Yoseikan book (writtten in Japenese) made by Harajiri Hideki.

http://www.amazon.co.jp/gp/product/4585054014/ref=cm_cr_rev_prod_title

Stormcrow34
08-14-2009, 10:57 PM
Thanks for the link Mr. Orange.

I ordered it immediately and have been impatiently waiting for it's delivery. :D

I'm curious, did you help contribute with the production of this book?

ChrisHein
08-14-2009, 11:56 PM
I'm quickly becoming and Aikido and Jujutsu collector, this will make for some interesting reading I'm sure. Thanks!

Flintstone
08-15-2009, 05:29 PM
Many thanks for the find. Ordered both!! Can't wait to have them delivered, although I already own Dynamic Budo 1 & 2 in which Kruyning Sensei based his new volume!!

David Orange
08-17-2009, 02:19 PM
Thanks for the link Mr. Orange.

I ordered it immediately and have been impatiently waiting for it's delivery. :D

I'm curious, did you help contribute with the production of this book?

Michael,

Thanks for ordering the book. Edgar is a great teacher of yoseikan budo and he was a close student of Minoru Mochizuki. He has full understanding of the complete system Minoru Mochizuki created and he has full support of Hiroo Mochizuki in the modern form of the art. He is physically and intellectually complete in these arts and this book details a lot about the unique sutemi waza (sacrifice throws) of yoseikan.

I helped Edgar with the English translation from the Dutch. They had already translated it, but I helped polish it up and I also wrote a preface, following Patrick McCarthy's comments. I can say that this is very close to the book I helped Minoru Mochiuzki write in the early 90s but which was never released. This is a worthy volume for anyone interested in Minoru Mochizuki's art.

Thanks for your enthusiasm and I hope you can get a lot from the book.

David

David Orange
08-17-2009, 02:23 PM
Many thanks for the find. Ordered both!! Can't wait to have them delivered, although I already own Dynamic Budo 1 & 2 in which Kruyning Sensei based his new volume!!

Edgar sent me copies of Dynamic Budo 1 & 2. Also great. And you are correct, much of The Art of Ju-Jutsu comes from those books.

Thanks to you all who ordered this book. I hope it will shine some light on the real value of the names of Mochizuki and Yoseikan.

David

Tijmen Ramakers
08-17-2009, 04:28 PM
And you are correct, much of The Art of Ju-Jutsu comes from those books.

Since I already have Dynamic Budo 1&2: You don't happen to know how many difference / new stuff there is in this new book compared to the DB volumes, do you?

David Orange
08-17-2009, 05:42 PM
Since I already have Dynamic Budo 1&2: You don't happen to know how many difference / new stuff there is in this new book compared to the DB volumes, do you?

Tijmen, I'd say it's worth the purchase. For one thing, I think The Art of Ju-Jutsu has a lot of photographs that aren't in the other books--a lot of rare photographs given to him by Minoru and Hiroo Mochizuki that you won't likely see elsewhere.

Best to you.

David

Stormcrow34
08-18-2009, 05:55 PM
Michael,

Thanks for ordering the book. Edgar is a great teacher of yoseikan budo and he was a close student of Minoru Mochizuki. He has full understanding of the complete system Minoru Mochizuki created and he has full support of Hiroo Mochizuki in the modern form of the art. He is physically and intellectually complete in these arts and this book details a lot about the unique sutemi waza (sacrifice throws) of yoseikan.

I helped Edgar with the English translation from the Dutch. They had already translated it, but I helped polish it up and I also wrote a preface, following Patrick McCarthy's comments. I can say that this is very close to the book I helped Minoru Mochiuzki write in the early 90s but which was never released. This is a worthy volume for anyone interested in Minoru Mochizuki's art.

Thanks for your enthusiasm and I hope you can get a lot from the book.

David

Thank you for your response Mr. Orange.

I just received the book today and I must say I am impressed with the amount of information enclosed. I'm far from qualified to comment on the accuracy and quality of the information because I'm only kyu ranked in Yoseikan Budo, but it does look very similar to my training program.

As far as the amount of information, I guess the same can be said for Yoseikan Budo. The Yoseikan syllabus is a bit overwhelming and vast in my limited view on the subject. It's definitely a life long study for amateurs like myself!

Please forward my thanks to Mr. Kruyning.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Mike C.

David Orange
08-18-2009, 09:42 PM
Thank you for your response Mr. Orange.

I just received the book today and I must say I am impressed with the amount of information enclosed. I'm far from qualified to comment on the accuracy and quality of the information because I'm only kyu ranked in Yoseikan Budo, but it does look very similar to my training program.

Who are you training with?

As far as the amount of information, I guess the same can be said for Yoseikan Budo. The Yoseikan syllabus is a bit overwhelming and vast in my limited view on the subject. It's definitely a life long study for amateurs like myself!

It's more than most people will ever be agle to get much of a handle on in a lifetime. Edgar has the most complete grasp of the yoseikan as taught by both father and son, of any non-Japanese I've ever known.

Please forward my thanks to Mr. Kruyning.

I hope you'll make the effort to go and train with him once you reach black belt.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Glad you got the book. Thanks for your efforts.

David

Stormcrow34
08-19-2009, 10:20 AM
Hello again Mr. Orange.

I train under Pack Sensei and Saiz Sensei in Central Florida in a very small school. I enjoy it very much and train as much as possible. On off days from the dojo (which has been too often lately) I train every evening after work, practicing kata, and going through tai sabaki, suburi, etc. on my own. Although the curriculum is expansive, it all fits together very nicely. It reminds me of a pyramid in many ways. I am always deeply impressed how the blocks I've seen so far, fit perfectly on top of one another. It seems a lot of care and thougth went into building this pyramid.

I wish I could have trained at The Yoseikan, but I am quite happy and feel lucky to have the teachers I do.

Thanks again.

Mike C.

David Orange
08-19-2009, 10:45 AM
I train under Pack Sensei and Saiz Sensei in Central Florida in a very small school. I enjoy it very much and train as much as possible.

Great. That's the way to make a lot of progress. I hope you'll find Edgar's book to be a helpful reference. Best to you.

David

Michael Hackett
08-20-2009, 10:22 AM
I got to spend five minutes last evening after class thumbing through a friend's copy. If you are a Yoseikan practitioner, you need two copies; one for your library and one to go in your dojo bag for quick reference. Beautiful piece of work and I'm ordering my copy this morning - and no, I'm not a Yoseikan guy.

David Orange
08-20-2009, 11:00 AM
I got to spend five minutes last evening after class thumbing through a friend's copy. If you are a Yoseikan practitioner, you need two copies; one for your library and one to go in your dojo bag for quick reference. Beautiful piece of work and I'm ordering my copy this morning - and no, I'm not a Yoseikan guy.

Mochizuki Sensei would have been proud of this book. Edgar did a great job with it.

David

Stormcrow34
08-22-2009, 09:22 AM
Man this book is great! It has some of my favorite kata: Jutsuri, Hyori and Tai Sabaki no kata. But I didn't find Ken Tai Ichi. Did I miss it? Or was it excluded?

David Orange
08-22-2009, 09:48 PM
Man this book is great! It has some of my favorite kata: Jutsuri, Hyori and Tai Sabaki no kata. But I didn't find Ken Tai Ichi. Did I miss it? Or was it excluded?

I just looked at the table of contents and it's excluded. I hadn't even noticed that. I think it's because he includes so much katori shinto ryu and also trained with Sugino Sensei in that. I hadn't noticed. It's certainlyone of the major important katas that Minoru Sensei developed. And now that you mention it, Sensei's final kata, Sutemi Waza No Kata is also excluded. That's a very interesting kata, as well.

Still, all said and done, The Art of Jujutsu is very close to the book Mochizuki Minoru Sensei wanted to produce while I was in the dojo. It is the most complete work now in English and I doubt we'll see anything else with this much detail in English for quite a while.

Best to all.

David

Michael Hackett
08-24-2009, 01:18 AM
Mr. Orange,

Is Sutemi Waza no Kata different than Tai Sabaki no Kata? Some folks in my dojo are Yoseikan people who practice that art on Saturdays and they do a long kata with, I think, nine sutemi called Tai Sabaki no Kata. Assuming that they are two different things, could you give a brief description of what each is? I DID order the book, I swear, but it hasn't arrived yet. Thanks in advance.

Flintstone
08-24-2009, 04:11 AM
Mr. Orange,

Is Sutemi Waza no Kata different than Tai Sabaki no Kata? Some folks in my dojo are Yoseikan people who practice that art on Saturdays and they do a long kata with, I think, nine sutemi called Tai Sabaki no Kata. Assuming that they are two different things, could you give a brief description of what each is? I DID order the book, I swear, but it hasn't arrived yet. Thanks in advance.
While Taisabaki no Kata includes some sutemi, it's by no means an all-sutemi Kata, like the Sutemi Waza no Kata.

David Orange
08-24-2009, 11:27 AM
Is Sutemi Waza no Kata different than Tai Sabaki no Kata?

Michael, those are two different kata. Tai Sabaki no Kata shows inside and outside versions of the fundamental tai sabaki: nagashi, hiraki, irimi, irimi senkai and o irimi senkai (which has only an outside version). There are a couple of sutemi waza in tai sabaki no kata, but Sutemi Waza no Kata is ten (10 [I think]) sutemi waza only. I believe that kata is shown in the two-tape video set that was produced in the mid-90s. Not sure. It's a great kata.

Hope that's helpful.

David

Flintstone
08-24-2009, 11:34 AM
I believe that kata is shown in the two-tape video set that was produced in the mid-90s. Not sure. It's a great kata.
Yes, both of them are shown in those tapes. Great katas, btw!

Michael Hackett
08-24-2009, 12:18 PM
Thank you both! I've done the Tai Sabaki no Kata a couple of times with my friends and never recognized that all the tai sabaki movements were included in the kata, rather focusing on receiving the throws (a couple of which can be pretty darned scary ukemi). Thinking back while considering Mr. Orange's description triggered my memory of the movement. Can't wait to get the book....maybe today.

Stormcrow34
08-24-2009, 12:57 PM
I too have noticed that sutemi ukemi can be harsh. At least in the learning stages (as in my case) it seems like in alot of the full sutemi, the uke has to be good enough to take the impact for the tori as well.

I had a chance to dig deeper into this fantastic book this weekend. It's interesting to see how much time Mr. Kruyning spent on the self development aspect of budo. Very interesting indeed. It's great to see that after physical peak there is still much to offer from budo.

David Orange
08-24-2009, 10:20 PM
I too have noticed that sutemi ukemi can be harsh. At least in the learning stages (as in my case) it seems like in alot of the full sutemi, the uke has to be good enough to take the impact for the tori as well.

The sutemi waza are seriously dangerous. You have to be good to take the throw, but you also have to keep mistakes in mind and unexpected things because a sutemi waza is full commitment. You really have to be able to take whatever comes.

I had a chance to dig deeper into this fantastic book this weekend. It's interesting to see how much time Mr. Kruyning spent on the self development aspect of budo. Very interesting indeed. It's great to see that after physical peak there is still much to offer from budo.

Edgar's just 40. He's got a way to go before he peaks, I believe.

If you really want an idea of what can be done in later years, though, you should also invest in a copy of Transparent Power, by Tatsuo Kimura, and read the life story of Yukiyoshi Sagawa. He was a student of Sokaku Takeda from age 11 until Takeda's death in 1943, many years. He trained with Takeda in far more depth than Morihei Ueshiba and he had a different opinion of what aiki is. That's a great book as well.

Best to you.

David

David Orange
08-24-2009, 10:28 PM
Thank you both! I've done the Tai Sabaki no Kata a couple of times with my friends and never recognized that all the tai sabaki movements were included in the kata, rather focusing on receiving the throws (a couple of which can be pretty darned scary ukemi). Thinking back while considering Mr. Orange's description triggered my memory of the movement. Can't wait to get the book....maybe today.

There was a great feeling in doing the katas created by Minoru Mochizuki. I loved doing tai sabaki no kata, jutsuri no kata, hyori no kata, and ken tai itchi no kata. Each one had a distinct personality and a round, smooth flow. Excellent kata. Careful with those sutemi!

David

Stormcrow34
08-25-2009, 07:42 AM
The sutemi waza are seriously dangerous. You have to be good to take the throw, but you also have to keep mistakes in mind and unexpected things because a sutemi waza is full commitment. You really have to be able to take whatever comes.

Edgar's just 40. He's got a way to go before he peaks, I believe.

If you really want an idea of what can be done in later years, though, you should also invest in a copy of Transparent Power, by Tatsuo Kimura, and read the life story of Yukiyoshi Sagawa. He was a student of Sokaku Takeda from age 11 until Takeda's death in 1943, many years. He trained with Takeda in far more depth than Morihei Ueshiba and he had a different opinion of what aiki is. That's a great book as well.

Best to you.

David

Thanks for the advice on sutemi ukemi.

I wasn't implying that Mr. Kruyning is an old goat, I was implying that I was an old goat, and that the idea was nice that in budo there is a place for everyone. That's basically the gist of what I meant to say about that.

I've read some about Sagawa in Mr. Pranins book; "Daito-ryu Aikijujutsu: Conversations with Daito-ryu Masters". But I will add that one to my list right behind; "Hidden in Plain Sight", by Ellis Amdur. I just cracked that one open yesterday evening and I was up way too late reading last night...

Happy Landings!

Flintstone
08-25-2009, 07:49 AM
Actually, I feel more confortable doing ukemi from sutemi waza than some others, like shihokoshinage... Wonder if it's just me, but tori gains full control of uke during a sutemi, so ukemi basically consists on let go. Or maybe I'm completely wrong here, but at least it's how I feel when ukemi-ing for sutemi!!

Only 0.02€ worth...

Michael Hackett
08-25-2009, 05:18 PM
Just received my copy this afternoon and it's worth every penny! I plan to buy a few more copies as gifts. My only complaint is that it should be a hardcover book as it will be an important addition to my library.

As for the sutemi ukemi, they are both scary and dangerous as Uke. For me, the key is tucking my head and trying to relax every fiber of my body. Resisting, from my very limited experience, is both futile and dangerous as it can be. For someone not accustomed to taking falls, some of these sutemi would be crippling if not fatal.

I recommend the book without reservation.

darin
08-26-2009, 10:24 AM
Thanks David. I just ordered my copy. It will probably take a few weeks to arrive in Australia.

Flintstone
09-14-2009, 11:07 AM
Just got my copy today! Wow, it's a great compilation!! Worth all the waiting, for sure!

David Orange
09-15-2009, 07:43 PM
Thanks David. I just ordered my copy. It will probably take a few weeks to arrive in Australia.

Get that yet?

David

David Orange
09-15-2009, 07:44 PM
Just got my copy today! Wow, it's a great compilation!! Worth all the waiting, for sure!

Edgar does a great job, all around. That's why Mochizuki Sensei liked him so much.

David

David Orange
10-16-2009, 09:42 PM
Edgar does a great job, all around. That's why Mochizuki Sensei liked him so much.


Edgar did ask me to extend his appreciation to all who have expressed interest in The Art of Jujutsu and especially in Minoru Mochizuki Sensei's old Shizuoka way. He thanks everyone for the kind comments and especially, of course, for purchasing the book.

Best wishes to all.

In budo.

David