PDA

View Full Version : tsuki kotegaeshi/ura how fast


Please visit our sponsor:
 

AikiWeb Sponsored Links - Place your Aikido link here for only $10!


tim evans
07-21-2009, 12:38 AM
How fast do I bring uke around I really like the technique but I,m skittish on how much velocity to put on him to bring him around .any tips THANKS

ChrisHein
07-21-2009, 02:07 AM
As with most Aikido techniques, uke decides that. If he comes fast, you throw fast, if he comes slow, you go slow.

jss
07-21-2009, 03:22 AM
Don't bring uke around, take his balance to the rear and to the side. There will be no need to worry about the speed: uke will fall down or come around at his own speed.

dalen7
07-21-2009, 01:14 PM
How fast do I bring uke around I really like the technique but I,m skittish on how much velocity to put on him to bring him around .any tips THANKS

my favorite technique... [besides Nikkyo & Sankyo]...
You will find that you can get a good Rokkyo on him this way to.
[Maybe Im dreaming, but seemed to work for me.] :)

Peace

dAlen

RED
07-21-2009, 03:19 PM
This is a 5th kyu technique at our dojo.
This is how I typically do it, take it with as much worth as you like:
When the uke enters I step off line to the side of the uke that's leading. (the side that's shooting the punch.) While i'm stepping off line i'm pushing my hand that's closest to the uke out to feel for his punching hand. I use my forearm to blend and deflect his punch. (not grab of block, tsuki is done with the assumption that the attacker has a knife or spear.) Once i'm done blending i should end up in a very particular position. I should end up with my hips facing in the exact same direction in which the uke is facing, our hips should almost be parallel but there should be an arm's length distance to give you room in case of a reversal.

Once I have the punching arm deflected I then grab the arm with my deflecting hand and force the arm down to my knee(the knee furthest from the uke. I cut so low because I'm doing the technique trying to get the uke on the ground, so my first cut might as well be low because that's where I want him to go anyways.)
I then hold the uke's arm to my knee with the opposite hand I blocked with.(When you switch hands I like to move the first from the wrist up the arm to the uke's arm a littlt while the other hand takes over the control of the wrist. I use my hand to pull the uke's shoulders into my center so I can control his rotation. )
At this point you can either do the kotegaeshi omote or ura.

If you are going to go ura: move the hand that's on the uke's forearm quickly back to the wrist as you step low around the backside of the uke, tenkan, then tenkan again as you apply kotegaeshi.
For omote: after you have placed the uke in your center quickly move your hand from his forearm and back to his wrist. Apply the kotegaeshi in your center at your belt knot as you tenkan away from the uke.

This technique is fun to break fall off of ^_^

RED
07-21-2009, 04:32 PM
Honestly if you keep him in your center you while you go around him, you have absolute control on how fast you bring him around. You can go whipping fast or demo slow and have the form be perfect if you just keep him in front of you, in my opinion of course.

tim evans
07-21-2009, 08:29 PM
I tried the going low as I lead him around it doesn,t put as much strain on the arm as keeping it on your hip does or atleast thats what my uke said so back to slow .:)

tim evans
07-22-2009, 11:30 PM
Anybody know of any good videos on this technique the bring them around low works but now I feel like I,m leaning over to far this is driving me crazy.:crazy: :crazy:

Suru
07-22-2009, 11:57 PM
I have succeeded with many of the forms mentioned here, but if you're in a normal class situation, respond to the punch/thrust how Sensei does. As far as the speed and timing, I have fun figuring those out through repeated technique. It's sort of like trial and error, trial and less error...trial and insignificant error.

Drew

RED
07-24-2009, 02:12 PM
I have succeeded with many of the forms mentioned here, but if you're in a normal class situation, respond to the punch/thrust how Sensei does. As far as the speed and timing, I have fun figuring those out through repeated technique. It's sort of like trial and error, trial and less error...trial and insignificant error.

Drew

I agree. Frankly I never really fully absorb the complexities of technique until I've done it literally over 100 times. Trial and error- it becomes personal that way and thus an instinctual reaction in my experience. People explaining or showing what I should do rarely works with me. I need to just feel it out over and over and over again.