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gdandscompserv
06-14-2009, 11:26 PM
My father-in-law introduced me to 'mountain man' muzzleloading, weapons building, and buckskinning skills soon after I married his beautiful daughter. I learned to build tomahawks and knives. I also learned how to load, shoot and care for muzzle loader rifles and pistols. As I was watching people train in kyudo at the Okinawa Budokan the other day it made me realize that I had been practicing a ‘martial art' all these years without really recognizing it as such. Seeing them practice kyudo reminded me much of the way I was taught to shoot and care for muzzle loader rifles. All these years I have been training in an American ‘koryu' and I didn't even know it. I had to return to Okinawa again for it to dawn on me.:cool:

Kevin Leavitt
06-15-2009, 06:36 AM
some might also call them "life skills". I am betting both samurai and mountain men did what they did and much of what they did was so ubiquitous to their daily living that they never gave most things they did a second thought.

I think it is not until the skills become novel or obsolete that we start looking at them as separate and distinct skills and start looking at piece of what they did as "special" "art" or "craft" for sure.

I know in the infantry we learn lots of things that get passed down from generations to generation...we call it "field craft". There are some basic principles and things that we have carried forward and look at the "old" as timeless. Such things as Sun Tzu, Rogers Rangers Standing Orders, and now we are back to basic jiu jitsu as well as a foundational skill!

Then you fast forward to things like "silly string" which 10 years ago would have seem like not such a serious tool to have in your tool box, but today, it is more valuable than a sword in combat.

I think it is hard to recognize sometimes what we do as being special or unique when it is a integral part of what we do and who we are.

Yeah, I'd say that what you do is "martial" in the context of how you are looking at it.

I tend to be more specific with the term though and would apply the term "life skill" or "field craft". Unless that is, it was related to a direct martial application.

btw, tomahawks are back in voque with the Military. I carry one in "combat" and practice using it as they are very useful tools/weapons!

http://www.americantomahawk.com/products/vtac.htm

David Orange
06-15-2009, 08:42 AM
Then you fast forward to things like "silly string" which 10 years ago would have seem like not such a serious tool to have in your tool box, but today, it is more valuable than a sword in combat.


Silly string? Is that a code word for some kind of fragmentation device?

Hope to see you at Dan's seminar.

David

HL1978
06-15-2009, 11:38 AM
Silly string? Is that a code word for some kind of fragmentation device?

Hope to see you at Dan's seminar.

David

I believe they use it to find tripwires.

dps
06-15-2009, 12:03 PM
I believe they use it to find tripwires.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16079446/

David

ChrisHein
06-15-2009, 12:17 PM
Lucky man to have a father in law who would take the time to teach you his ways. Sounds like fun stuff.

Kevin Leavitt
06-15-2009, 01:28 PM
Silly string? Is that a code word for some kind of fragmentation device?

Hope to see you at Dan's seminar.

David

sorry I won't be there. Wish I could! yeah as Hunter pointed out, it is used to find trip wires.

All the money we have on R and D and some soldier figures out that silly string works best to find trip wires!

Kevin Leavitt
06-15-2009, 01:31 PM
So 100 years from now will there be a koryu style that trains on the use of Silly String? :)

David Orange
06-15-2009, 02:54 PM
So 100 years from now will there be a koryu style that trains on the use of Silly String? :)

Will it be added to Rogers' Rangers' Standing Orders?

Sorry you won't be at Dan's clinic.

Best to you.

David