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earnest aikidoka
02-10-2009, 08:33 PM
hi all

i read a bk on aikido that talked about how to find your centre, so how do u go bout doing so and how do u no whether u have succeeded in finding your centre?

Janet Rosen
02-11-2009, 01:29 PM
Just keep training.

Stefan Stenudd
03-25-2009, 12:31 PM
I've probably answered this or similar questions before, so pardon me if I get repetitive.

The best center training I know is bokken suburi. Straight cuts - raising the sword from chudan kamae to jodan kamae, and back down again in the cut. That really develops one's center.

So do belly breathing exercises and mokuso.

I have written about it here:
http://www.stenudd.com/aikido/tanden.htm

gregstec
03-25-2009, 01:28 PM
Very simple - go to the roof of a tall building and jump off - as you are free falling, remove all tension from your body and totally relax - the spot that hits the ground first will be your Center :D

lbb
03-25-2009, 04:39 PM
The best center training I know is bokken suburi. Straight cuts - raising the sword from chudan kamae to jodan kamae, and back down again in the cut. That really develops one's center.

I think it depends some on your experience (not necessarily with aikido, but with body movement). If you're not used to movement where awareness of center is developed/reinforced, I think bokken suburi or similar exercises will mostly teach you where your center isn't, or will exacerbate the feeling of not being centered. That's not necessarily a bad thing, it's just that I don't think anybody should do bokken suburi expecting it to be a short, direct path to finding/developing your center. There is no such path IMO.

Stefan Stenudd
03-26-2009, 09:53 AM
I don't think anybody should do bokken suburi expecting it to be a short, direct path to finding/developing your center. There is no such path IMO.
There is no short path to anything in aikido.

Basia Halliop
03-26-2009, 02:26 PM
quote:
"Very simple - go to the roof of a tall building and jump off - as you are free falling, remove all tension from your body and totally relax - the spot that hits the ground first will be your Center"

Cute :). Although unfortunately (fortunately?) it's not true. What part of your body hits first will pretty much definitely NOT be your centre.

Basia Halliop
03-26-2009, 02:32 PM
Although I find the idea of 'finding your centre' to be really weird. What on earth does that mean? Your centre is your centre - it's not like it gets lost. I guess they mean something less literal, though, like being aware of your position and posture and specifically the position of your centre with respect to uke or to your limbs or to the ground (how high or low, how you are moving it...) or whatever..?. OK, I suppose I can make some kind of sense of that idea if I think it through... makes me very glad to have a teacher who basically speaks what I think of as plain english, though :).

Stefan Stenudd
03-26-2009, 08:41 PM
Basia, there is more to it. Trust me ;)
If all you get is plain English, then maybe that's not all.

gregstec
03-27-2009, 11:55 AM
Cute :). Although unfortunately (fortunately?) it's not true. What part of your body hits first will pretty much definitely NOT be your centre.

Well, if you really relax totally, it will be close :)

phitruong
03-27-2009, 04:19 PM
Well, if you really relax totally, it will be close :)

i believed that if your body bounced then it's not dead center so you have to try again until your body no longer bounced of the ground. don't forget that clothing will create air drag which affects your ability to find the true center; therefore, you need to remove all clothing items before jumping which should tell you that folks who wore hakama have never been able to find their center. :D